pronunciations & yoke handling

cointyro

New Member
So, another few stupid questions. Figured it was about time.

It is "guy-ro" or "gee-ro" or "gi-ro"? As in the directional gyro, etc.

It is "La Gwardia" or La "Guard"-ia?

To establish a 20 degree left bank in, say, a 172, when starting from wings level, after you rotate the yoke leftward (leave the rudder and pulling back aside for a moment), you wait for the AI to indicate a 20 degree bank... then do you neutralize the yoke (rotate it level again) or hold it at the same (left side down) angle?

it occurred to me that the way to hold the 20 degree bank in MSFS with a joystick might be different than in real life... in MSFS it seems I can either neutralize the joystick OR hold it at the same angle... either way I stay fairly close to a 20 degree bank until I give rightward (of center) input.

I'm only using MSFS to get accustomed to maneuver speed entries, "stages" to think of in flight (know where to look for instruments, flap stages upon approach, etc.). Also am trying to get my brain to internalize the "rotate downward" on the trim wheel to trim out back pressure... it still is not immediately intuitive (I have to think about it momentarily).

Thanks for any suggestions!
 

I_Money

Moderator
Until you are working on your instrument trade in MSFS for some chair flying. You will be grateful in the long run.
 

Wolverine

New Member
It's going to depend on the plane. On most light GAs like the 172, if you roll into a medium bank turn (20-30 degrees) it will maintain that bank with neutral ailerons. If you roll into a shallow bank (0-15 degrees), the plane will want roll back level and you'll have to maintain the ailerons in the direction of your turn. If you roll into a steep bank (35+ degrees) the plane will want to overbank and you'll need opposite aileron to maintain the bank.

In short:
Shallow bank - maintain ailerons in direction of turn
Medium bank - neutralize ailerons when in turn
Steep bank - oppostite ailerons to prevent overbanking
 

Brandon

New Member
The amount of aileron needed to maintain bank angle also depends on whether you are in a climbing, descending, or level turn
 

E_Dawg

Moderator
jye - ro

The one I could never figure out prior to actually flying was pitot = pee - toe

I remember asking on my first lesson if it was called a pit - tot haha.


I disagree with Iain (sorry Iain!)... I think if you maximize the screen in MSFS where you only have the few instruments on the bottom you can get a rough feel and understanding of controls before you actually train.

Plus you can play around with a few other things in FS that would be dangerous in real life.... such as flying in MVFR to see how hazzerdous it is if you don't know what's going on, along with the fun things like loops, etc
 

aloft

New Member
I'll split the difference between Ed and Iain; MSFS can be useful for pre-flying your cross-countries, but seriously, put it away until then. It'll just mess you up. I consider myself a mildly avid simmer, I had to fight the head-in-the-cockpit syndrome that many simmers do when they get in a real airplane. The controls feel nothing like the airplane, the views out the windscreen look nothing like they do in the airplane, so all you're doing is enabling negative transfer. Here's an example: in the pattern, a simmer will look for the correct heading on the DG; a non-simmer will look for a visual reference and point the nose in that direction. Which do you think is more appropriate? Which is safer?

When you get to your instrument training, by all means, fire up your sim of choice; maintaining positional awareness while IFR is largely a mental exercise, one that can indeed be "simulated" on the ground. It's also an inexpensive way to increase your familiarity/comfort level with your radio nav skills or try approaches other than the ones in your area.
 

cointyro

New Member
Thanks all for the feedback!

I know MSFS is an anathema for newbies. But in all honesty it is the closest thing I've got to get used to instrument layout and try to remember when to pull down / pull up on the trim wheel... I haven't progressed to flying patterns, just figuring out maneuver entries and trim / speed coordinations for simple climbs, descents, etc.

It may be a while until a $100-an-hour lesson spree becomes economical... until then poring over my Gleim, Jeppesen, Kershner, and MSFS will hopefully do... and I'll keep the questions coming!

Jye-ro, it is!
 

I_Money

Moderator
[ QUOTE ]
It may be a while until a $100-an-hour lesson spree becomes economical... until then poring over my Gleim, Jeppesen, Kershner, and MSFS will hopefully do

[/ QUOTE ]

You see MSFS could actually cost you more. You might be getting bad habits (like relying on the instruments) that you will have to break before you solo, and that could require a few more hours then if you did some chair flying and had a post of a 172's cockpit.
 

cointyro

New Member
Speaking of a poster of a 172 cockpit, I've got the one from Sporty's catalogue, but it is a Turbo 182 with no carb heat knob. Is that sufficient?

OK OK, I'll do more chair flying than MSFSing. The view of the Sporty's building never seems to change though no matter what airspeed, attitude, or climb/descent profile I'm in...
 

naunga

New Member
[ QUOTE ]
The one I could never figure out prior to actually flying was pitot = pee - toe

[/ QUOTE ]
That's an easy one. It's French.

The principal that the airspeed indicator works on was developed by Henri Pitot.

Check this out: How does a speedometer in an airplane work?

Personally I think it should be renamed to the Freedom Tube!


Cheers.

Naunga
 

davetheflyer

New Member
A "gee-ro" is a food. A "jiro" is an instrument.

New Yorkers call it "La-gwordia."

The yoke goes back toward neutral, otherwise the roll will continue to increase.
 
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