PPl Training

turbojet28

Well-Known Member
Hello everyone,

I am planning on starting my PPL next week at the local FBO. I am currently reading Rod Machado's book. My instructor said that that book alone will be good for ground school part of training. I was thinking that I would also have to use one of the interactive courses (i.e. Jeppesen, King, Gleim, etc), but he says I don't. What is your opinion of that?Also he likes to do a lot of flying and just get to the ground stuff on rainy days. Is this a good idea, or should the ground stuff be done first? Also I plan on training in a 152 in which I can buy block time in (which will make it much cheaper in the end) and then getting checked out in a 172 after I get my license (since I will be flying a 172 with my family mainly). Do you think this is a good idea, or should I train in a 172 the whole time? It seems like I have done all the research I can in the past 2+ years and that I have gotten all the info i needed for flight training, but when you actually go in to start, it isn't as easy to make these decisions as I thought (already learning
). Just post your thoughts on the "curriculum" I have just outlined. I want to learn as much as I can and be a safe, knowledgeable, proffessional acting pilot and would greatly appreciate your input. Thanks a lot and have a great weekend!
 

DE727UPS

Well-Known Member
I'd say your plan is good if you're a book guy. I recently had a couple of private students who didn't do well with the book study and did better with the CD rom's. Personally, I did fine with just books. The 152 is a great trainer, I own one, and you'll find it and easy transition to the 172.
 

JHines

New Member
I think it is helpful in addition to whatever study materials you have to get a "cram" book which just has the questions from old written tests to study. Although theoretically a student's ground training or book study should give him all the needed knowledge for the test, there's no real substitute for studying the old questions. Gleim makes good, inexpensive cram books (with the red covers).
 

gay_pilot18

New Member
To answer one of your other questions. Ground school is nice and all but actually learning to fly in the plane is much better.

My PPL instructor was of the same mind we typically only do "ground school" when the weather is really bad. All other times we flew.

At my flight school we use the Cessna/King CD ROM kits the jokes are very "cheesy" but the information/instruction contained within is very informative.

But in addition to the CD ROMS there is course guide book for all those who prefer reading to learning to fly ona computer.
 

Pilot Hopeful

Well-Known Member
Wow! Your instructor is lucky to have an ambitious student like you who has already taken the initiative to begin flight training.

Now, reading a book cannot teach you how to fly, but it can provide a solid understanding of the flight environment, your aircraft, and how to perform maneuvers. Then, the flight instructor takes what you have read and actively applies it to flying the plane. Prior preparation and desire to learn the less-than-exciting fundamentals will reap huge dividends once you begin the actual flight training.

Although I have not read Rod Machado’s book, I do believe, as your instructor indicated, that some pilots use this as a primary reference. Thus, as other posts have indicated, you likely will not need additional to supplement your reading.

One post wisely suggests finding the Gleim book for preparing for your written test. This book relies on information you have seen in your primary text and presents many of the questions you will encounter on the written test. If you have any question when studying for the written, you can read explanations beside the particular question or find a more thorough explanation on the entire subject in your primary reference source.

Your concern about ground school is a valid one. When your instructor mentioned saving ground school for rainy days, most likely he was referring to lengthy sessions for discussing involved subjects, such as airspace, communications, and cross-country planning. He should probably include a long session about aircraft systems early in your training, however, to ensure you a thorough knowledge of the plane before proceeding well into the curriculum.

Also, you will likely have short, informal “ground school” before every flight where your instructor briefs you on maneuvers to be performed as well as new experiences (airspace, communications, weather, etc.) you may encounter on that particular flight. (Introducing these items in flight is a sure route to student frustration and wasted money.)

Asking questions when you do not understand a topic in your reading or something from the flight is acceptable at any point throughout your training. And you can confirm your training progress by referencing the private pilot practical test standards (available for purchase or free download from the FAA website).

You should have no trouble doing your private pilot training in a 152 and then transitioning to the 172 after your checkride. This step will only take 3-5 flight hours (maybe less), and your instructor will cover many of the topics and maneuvers you visited in training for the private pilot checkride, such as aircraft systems, takeoff and landing, slow flight, stalls, and steep turns.

Enjoy!
 

DeltaASA16

Well-Known Member
Hey! A new pilot just starting out! Congrats!

I learned got my training entirely on the C152. They are great trainers. I am currently in the phase of switching from the C152 to C172 while begining my instrument course. After a few lessons in the C172, learning the fuel system, the GPS(optional) and the avionics, you'll be set. I highly recommend the C152 for your PPL as long as you aren't any heavier than 200 lbs.

For a computer aid to back up your ground training. I would highly recommend following the course of study your instructor sets for you.. What ever he will be testing from. However, you can't learn everything about flyin from one book so take advantage of the wealth of knowledge out there! I went out and purchased (well, my parents did) we purchased the Sportys DVD Private Pilot Course. It was an excelent source of information that I had already covered in the text.. kind of a second kick in the ass to remeber things!
And you pick up on some interesting facts and techniques!

Good Luck on your training and be sure to give us updates on how things are going!

DeltaASA16
 

kellwolf

Piece of Trash
I used the Jeppesen books, but then again I found them on E-bay used.
I've heard the Machado book is excellent. What I did was study the Jepp books for the theory, aerodynamics, etc and used the Gleim book for the written. If there was something in the Gleim I didn't quite grasp, I could always go back to the Jepp for detail. I did that for both my Private and my Instrument, and I will probably do the same for my Comm Multi.
 

davetheflyer

New Member
I have used the King computer courses and found them helpful in studying for the written. I have also used both King and Jeppesen videos. Personally I like Jepp for the graphics and the lack of John and Martha King
.

I would recommend doing the flight and ground training together. The ground school will make more sense if you see how the material is used in the airplane and vice versa. I would plan on taking the knowledge test by the time you get to the cross-country stage of your flight training. If you wait longer, it may delay your checkride. If you do it a lot earlier, the material won't be as fresh for your oral exam.

I would also recommend that you do your PPL entirely in the C150. Staying in one type of airplane will make your training easier. The 150 is not as big and fast as the 172, but for the private you need hours, not miles, and the only passenger you need to carry is your CFI. Check out in the 172 after you get your license.
 

Pilot Hopeful

Well-Known Member
[ QUOTE ]
I would recommend doing the flight and ground training together. The ground school will make more sense if you see how the material is used in the airplane and vice versa. I would plan on taking the knowledge test by the time you get to the cross-country stage of your flight training. If you wait longer, it may delay your checkride. If you do it a lot earlier, the material won't be as fresh for your oral exam.

I would also recommend that you do your PPL entirely in the C150. Staying in one type of airplane will make your training easier. The 150 is not as big and fast as the 172, but for the private you need hours, not miles, and the only passenger you need to carry is your CFI. Check out in the 172 after you get your license.

[/ QUOTE ]

Solid advice from davetheflyer. Well said.
 

MrSkyKingRon

New Member
Jepp books, King videos, Sporty's videos/DVD's, Gleim books, many more books, AOPA videos, AOPA online seminars, AOPA live seminars, Flying club meetings, ground school, aviation videos, got them all, use them all, love them all. Theres more I'm sure. For me, I soak up as many different learning tools as I can get and still want more. Open yourself up to any source of aviation knowledge as you can handle. But that's just me, give it some thought. The topic of which is better, King or Sporty's etc. has been beaten well here on JC. Do whatever suits you. Give it some thought.

It's true, "a good pilot is always learning"


P.S.- Yes, solid advice from DaveTheFlyer.
 

ScorpionStinger

Well-Known Member
I did the PPL in a C-152 and it is as everyone else has said a great trainer, and cheap to. ( as long as your withing weight limits, 152 is the way to go!! )

You remind me of me before i got started !!! you'll do just fine,

P.s. Which ever matterial you think you'll learn better from; Go with it !!! a Good CFI will be able to Adjust to your learning Capacity. That's what Part 61 training is about, part 141 you follow there training aids.


Good Luck with your training,

Remember this.. " Don't Get Discouraged" Remember why you decided to get your PPL.
 

turbojet28

Well-Known Member
Hey Everyone,
Thanks to all who replied for me with the great advice! I really appreciate it and I love reading these boards and learning as much as possible.

Well yesterday was the day! Took my first lesson! We practiced Climbs, decends, turns, steep turns, and did a couple engine outs. This all being my first lesson with gusts up to 22 mph in a 152! It was a lot of fun (but quite bumpy, but hey the bumps are the fun part).

Hopefully I will be giving updates to my progress and will have questions to ask all of you to help me learn more and become a better pilot. Once again, thank you so much for all the support and knowledge that you lend!


TurboJet28

ps. I am 16 for those of you who were wondering (will be 17 in April, 2004)
 

Derg

Cap, Roci
Staff member
That is pretty early for engine outs. But perhaps it could have been a demonstration that the airplane doesn't "fall out of the air" like Hollywood wants us to believe.
 
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