PPL Oral

AA

New Member
What is the ppl oral like? What is asked, what goes on, what do you need? ANY help would be great guys!
 

FL270

New Member
Pick up ASA's Private Pilot Oral Exam Guide. It gives you a pretty good walk-through of a typical oral including answers to all the questions and references for where to look up the answers yourself.

FL270
 

hammer

New Member
And the examiner is not allowed to ask any questions that aren't in the ASA guide. If he does or asks you to elaborate beyond the answer you've memorized, just say "I don't have to answer that."
 

HuzzLord

Well-Known Member
Just took my private oral yesterday, although it was a long oral time wise about half of it was the examiner telling me flying stories and us talking about different aviation issues. As far as the actual oral questioning my examiner mainly concentrated on the cross-country flight plan with quite a few questions about weight and balance as well as stability. Most of the questions where more situational rather then just straight facts. I ended up not using any other resources other then the sectional and my flight plan. However from what other instructors have told me it really depends on the examiner as each one as there own subject areas that they like to focus on.

Good luck on yours,

Chris
 

FL270

New Member
Hammer, I never said, nor meant to imply, that it was the be-all, end-all study source. It is, however, a good place to start.

FL270
 

rhs

New Member
Be sure to check out the Checkride Central forum here!

My advice: don't elaborate. Answer each question as directly as possible. If the examiner wants to keep talking, let him. It just eats up your time and tires himr out.
 

hammer

New Member
[ QUOTE ]
Hammer, I never said, nor meant to imply, that it was the be-all, end-all study source. It is, however, a good place to start.

[/ QUOTE ]

I know ... I was just giving you a hard time. Hence the smiley face at the end of my post. As opposed to the angry one.
 

mastermags

Well-Known Member *giggity*
[ QUOTE ]
PTS

[/ QUOTE ]

Exactly... go down the examiner's checklist and know all of that stuff on the list, cross checking with the oral exam guide... it does depend on the examiner, but, definately know your particular airplane's systems. And you will probably explain your cross country in detail.
 

Sprint100

Well-Known Member
[ QUOTE ]
And the examiner is not allowed to ask any questions that aren't in the ASA guide. If he does or asks you to elaborate beyond the answer you've memorized, just say "I don't have to answer that."

[/ QUOTE ]

Know your ASA guide though, because you could look like a total arse if you say that for the wrong question LOL.
 

hammer

New Member
In all seriousness, the ASA guide provide some good stuff. I used them for all aspects of my training and they give excellent answers and overviews to the questions you may be asked however are useless for any questions that have theory behind the explanation. Those things you need to read up on and learn on your own.
 

Jonnyb9040

New Member
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And the examiner is not allowed to ask any questions that aren't in the ASA guide.

[/ QUOTE ]
I didn't know that. I have been asked a question that wasn't in the book.
 

stalled

New Member
they can ask you, but they can't fail you if you don't know the answer. i would just try your best answering the question, the examiners i've been with wanted to make sure i was thinking.
 

E_Dawg

Moderator
The ASA book is not 'the test'. The PTS is.

The ASA book only helps you prepare for possible questions on the oral, it does not limit or give any indication of what will actually be asked. It's still a great book and if you know it, you probably know 99% of the questions - but you should also run through the actual PTS at least once.
 
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