PPL checkride comin' up (if I don't implode)

DrBenny

New Member
PPL checkride comin\' up (if I don\'t implode)

I am incredibly exhausted. I studied for four hours last night trying to memorize every emergency I might get on the ride. I was getting confused with all of the emergencies, and had a bit of a traffic jam when reading about the setup for ditching with and without engine power.

Anyway, we had another review session for the checkride and SODA ride. Tomorrow, CFI's 172 will be going for the 100 hr inspection. I never thought I'd say this but, THANK GOD--I need a rest from flying for one day!

Basically I did well, but I was so tired that I did a couple of really, really stupid things. For instance, I did a good steep turn to the left and got high praise from CFI. But then I did one to the right. It was just as smooth, and within about 40 feet. But I rolled out--right on the money--on the wrong heading! This had nothing to do with flying. BRAIN FART!

Then--and please do help me with this if you can--I had a problem with the setup for my diversion. After tracking the beginning of a cross-country rather well, we started going into some maneuvers (including the aforementioned steep turns). Afterwards, CFI said, "OK, divert to Easton." Well, I looked at the DG, saw that I was on 090, stated that I was "going East," then proceeded to look on the chart for my current position to the WEST of my last known position. Hello? East? West? Left? Right? Is this my ass or my head? BRAIN FART #2!

After the obligatory, "What the heck do you think you're doing?" CFI had to point out my position! See, but then I completed a pretty good by-the-books diversion which after a couple of small corrections (are they allowed if I announce them?) brought us right to Easton at exactly the ETA. That was good, because I had practiced several "paper" diversions, just to become easy with them.

So, I basically flew most of the maneuvers very well, but flush-the-toilet failed a couple of things! What can I do?

So, if you don't want to give me a bunch of comments, I'll limit my pleas for help to the following two:

1) What tricks do you have for that portion of the checkride where, after you've practiced maneuvers out in the boonies, you have to locate where you are? How about in 4-6 miles of haze? [Note: I have to be able to do this completely by pilotage--no radio or GPS nav allowed.]

2)Are a couple of corrections to my diversion allowed after I've turned on my initial course heading?

BTW, my next lesson is a formal mock checkride, complete with new cross-country.
 

Mavmb

Well-Known Member
Re: PPL checkride comin\' up (if I don\'t implode)

Well the biggest trick is to have the sectional, E6B, and plotter out and ready on your kneeboard as soon as you have to do the diversion. Use some VORs to get oriented, take radials from two VORs to help locate your current position. I'm sure the examiner will let you use VORs to help find your location. Good luck.
 

MikeD

Administrator
Staff member
Re: PPL checkride comin\' up (if I don\'t implode)

[ QUOTE ]
Well the biggest trick is to have the sectional, E6B, and plotter out and ready on your kneeboard as soon as you have to do the diversion. Use some VORs to get oriented, take radials from two VORs to help locate your current position. I'm sure the examiner will let you use VORs to help find your location. Good luck.

[/ QUOTE ]

Screw VORs, too much a crutch. Drop down to 500 AGL and use some good' ole visual and clock to map to ground navigation, along with some DR.

It'll make you good. Heck, that's why you're using a map anyways. Then when on course a little ways, tune in the VOR to prove to the prick you're right.
 

EatSleepFly

Well-Known Member
Re: PPL checkride comin\' up (if I don\'t implode)

1.) Know where you're at at all times while practicing maneuvers. Situational Awareness is the key.

2.) Do whatever it takes to get yourself to the airport selected for the diversion. Remember, diverting is an excercise in improv.- he (or she) is not going to expect you to narrow a heading down to a degree, complete with corrections for deviation, variation, and wind. Just pick a rough heading and use pilotage, dead reakoning, and whatever other resources you have available to get you there. I teach my students to use their pencil and grab a rough heading from a VOR rose...screwing around with plotters is pointless because all the info. you need is the second hand on your watch, the chart, and your pencil. Not to mention sitting there with a plotter and electronic E6B results in waaay too much head-down time.


Good luck!
 

MikeD

Administrator
Staff member
Re: PPL checkride comin\' up (if I don\'t implode)

[ QUOTE ]
2. Not to mention sitting there with a plotter and electronic E6B results in waaay too much head-down time.


Good luck!


[/ QUOTE ]


Agree; would suck to have a midair or hit a bird with your head down.

And when you compute your initial rough heading, only worry about that heading long enough to pick up a landmark you recognize yourself, or recognize from the map. Then don't worry about nats-ass headings from there, just fly pilotage from there.
 

Mahesh

New Member
Re: PPL checkride comin\' up (if I don\'t implode)

I agree about situational awareness. When I had my PPL check ride, I got lucky and right after a soft field take off, I was asked to track a VOR. Then a few minutes later, I had to divert so it was pretty easy to know where I was. However, the last maneuvers I did were ground reference maneuvers so I was quite low and couldn't see much in the haze to head back to the airport. Luckily, I had made a mental note of generally where I was so I knew what to look for when I started climbing.

I had to do a soft-field landing on a 90+ degree day with a slight tailwind. It was challenging to say the least!

Anyway, don't worry about all the little brain farts. It happened to me too. I'd be doing great and then I'd do something really stupid. It will all come together when you are with the DE. Just relax.

Ohhh, I didn't see where you live but MAKE SURE you know of all the TFRs and restricted areas close to you, even if you won't be going near it. ALso, when I took my check ride, I had to keep 121.5 tuned in on one radio at all times. If you have to do that, make sure you do it!

Sorry, I think I deviated from your two questions but tis is important too!

Mahesh
 

DrBenny

New Member
Re: PPL checkride comin\' up (if I don\'t implode)

Screw VORs, too much a crutch. Drop down to 500 AGL and use some good' ole visual and clock to map to ground navigation, along with some DR.

It'll make you good. Heck, that's why you're using a map anyways. Then when on course a little ways, tune in the VOR to prove to the prick you're right.



[/ QUOTE ]

I think I need a bit of this attitude!

Anyway, the diversion itself isn't the problem. The problem is that after several steep turns, stalls, emergency landing, etc., I've lost track of where I am. It is sort of a phony situation, if you think about it, because on a normal cross country, you won't interrupt the flight with this stuff. Well--never mind--maybe you will if you're alone and want to practice. Sigh. . . .
 

DrBenny

New Member
Re: PPL checkride comin\' up (if I don\'t implode)

[ QUOTE ]
1.) Know where you're at at all times while practicing maneuvers. Situational Awareness is the key.



[/ QUOTE ]

I think that was the problem. I was so concentrated on "maneuver time" that I lost track of where I was.

[ QUOTE ]
2.) Do whatever it takes to get yourself to the airport selected for the diversion. Remember, diverting is an excercise in improv.- he (or she) is not going to expect you to narrow a heading down to a degree, complete with corrections for deviation, variation, and wind. Just pick a rough heading and use pilotage, dead reakoning, and whatever other resources you have available to get you there. I teach my students to use their pencil and grab a rough heading from a VOR rose...screwing around with plotters is pointless because all the info. you need is the second hand on your watch, the chart, and your pencil. Not to mention sitting there with a plotter and electronic E6B results in waaay too much head-down time.

[/ QUOTE ]

Again, the actual diversion is no problem for me. CFI has a system complete with 10 degree drift lines, and regularly-spaced 10-mile points; both of these allow a very accurate and quickly-determined heading and distance calculation without risking sticking a plotter into your eye (which is what I'd probably do, anyway).

No, the first part is the key. I just have to know where I am!

[ QUOTE ]
Good luck!

[/ QUOTE ]

Thanks!
 

DrBenny

New Member
Re: PPL checkride comin\' up (if I don\'t implode)

Thanks, Mahesh, for your comments. Yep, I'm familiar with all of the crazy airspace around here!
 

MikeD

Administrator
Staff member
Re: PPL checkride comin\' up (if I don\'t implode)

[ QUOTE ]


Screw VORs, too much a crutch. Drop down to 500 AGL and use some good' ole visual and clock to map to ground navigation, along with some DR.

It'll make you good. Heck, that's why you're using a map anyways. Then when on course a little ways, tune in the VOR to prove to the prick you're right.



[/ QUOTE ]

I think I need a bit of this attitude!

Anyway, the diversion itself isn't the problem. The problem is that after several steep turns, stalls, emergency landing, etc., I've lost track of where I am. It is sort of a phony situation, if you think about it, because on a normal cross country, you won't interrupt the flight with this stuff. Well--never mind--maybe you will if you're alone and want to practice. Sigh. . . .

[/ QUOTE ]

Benny,

Figure out your position prior to initiating your airwork; and pick a prominent ground reference and work around/near it. I don't care how many stalls/steep turns/EP approaches, etc you do, you won't be much more than @3-4 miles away ,at most, from your last known position. When complete, fly to the prominent landmark, re0locate that landmark on your map, and complete your diversion.

Make life easy for yourself up there.

Then show the prick you're right.
 
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