planes,instructors & students?

aviator03

New Member
I'm a little confused. I was told that I will be flying 6 to 7 days a week, 6 to 7 hours a day. And I was also told that it will be one instructor to every two students. How is that possible?

If you fly every day for 6 to 7 hours a day they would have to have a lot of planes and instructors at each location. and the add says they have 60 planes and 21 locations. That gives each location 3 planes?

Please tell me how this works???
Do they only take a couple students a month?

If so, what kind of waiting list is there??

Thanks
 

Hollywood

New Member
i'm getting ready to start the program in a few weeks. i'm not real sure how the scheduling goes but i'm pretty sure there aren't any waiting lists. they just have certain dates during the month when classes start. you just pick a date and go. if that date is full, pick another one. provided you've interviewed and been accepted. hope that helps a little. other people on this thread know a lot more.
 

JDMcFly

New Member
Please note I am answering your question on what I believe, I have not attended ATP so my opinion is as good as yours.
______________________

I'm a little confused. I was told that I will be flying 6 to 7 days a week, 6 to 7 hours a day. And I was also told that it will be one instructor to every two students. How is that possible?

From talking to people, 6 to 7 hours sounds right during the cross country phase- but not really during the non-XC phases.


If you fly every day for 6 to 7 hours a day they would have to have a lot of planes and instructors at each location. and the add says they have 60 planes and 21 locations. That gives each location 3 planes?


I believe the aircraft are moved around a lot, especially because of the cross country phase. During that phase you are flying all over the country for long lengths of time. A/C moving around allows the fleet to be where it needs to be when it needs to be. ATP is very organized from what I've heard so everything is taken care of.


Please tell me how this works???
Do they only take a couple students a month?

If so, what kind of waiting list is there??


There probably isn't much a list if you apply early enough, you have to register a month before you start afterall. I don't know how many students they take a month.

That's all I can say, hope it's correct, I'm sure if it isn't some of the ATP students can correct me


I'm very interested in ATP as well, hopefully attending later this year.

[i
 

CapnJim

Well-Known Member
JD, you have it almost exactly right.
The DFW location typically has 4 Seminoles and a 172. Sometimes more, sometimes less.
You DO NOT fly 6 to 7 hours a week, 6 to 7 days a week. If that were the case then you would be done in about 25 days, less sim time and ground school.
During the x-country phase, which comes soon after your Multi add-on, Instrument rating, and insurance ride (you go up with another instructor who makes sure you aren't a bumblig idiot-- for insurance purposes), then you WILL be flying about 6-8 hours a day for anywhere from 4 days to a week and a half. It's fun. Lots of fun.
There's no waiting list, although the add-on students (those just getting thier ATP, or Multi add-on, etc.) do have priority over the planes simply because they are on a much tighter time frame, typically 5-7 days to your 90. Trust me, you will welcome a day off or when offered.
You will have one instructor for your Multi and Instrument rides, but after that It's Monkey's Choice. You may go to Jacksonville for your CFI transition, or maybe to Atlanta. For your Single engine training you may go anywhere. For all of the above you may stay at home base and not go anywhere. I recommend a spirit of adventure and flexibility.
 

Hollywood

New Member
soooo, if you do your multi and instrument training in one location and they send you somewhere else for the cfi transition and single training, do you have to drive to those locations or can you get dropped off in one of the aircraft. i have a sense of adventure but my car doesn't if you know what i mean. i don't want to do half of my training in one location and then have them tell me to drive half way across the country to finish. i doubt my car would make it.
 

CapnJim

Well-Known Member
No driving. You'll get to fly yourself there

Dispatch keeps track of how much cross-country time you have left, and plans it out for training trips. Transportation and lodging are taken care of while you are there. If you are lucky you'll get a hotel with a pool, maid service, and a bar close by. More than likely, you'll be in the company apartments, which vary in quality but all have three things in common: random leftover food from other transient students, nice (although dusty) furniture, and the expired-sectional-collage wallpaper.
 

pscraig

Well-Known Member
On the XC phase, 6-7 hours a day is correct. Before that, usually half days every day with a day off here and there depending on how you are doing. Some training flights are with you and your partner, one flying out and the other flying back.

It also depends on you and your level of preparation. If you need all the ground lessons in the lesson plans, prepare for long days. If you really dig into the books and know the material before showing up for the day, you will benefit in the form of more time off.
 
Top