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Pipeline Patrol

Avalon781ML

Well-Known Member
American Patrols may be looking for one pilot to fill a gap left by a former employee. They advertise on climbto350.com. Pay is 9.50 during training and 18 thereafter.... log about 40 hours a week.... based in Midland TX.

500 PIC is the only requirement that I know of..... but if you have TT that exceeds 500 it might be worth tossing in a resume. Very low level flying..... this is definitely a blue collar flying job.... but it is fun and money can be made...

Send any questions and/or resumes to americanpatrols@yahoo.com.

Any other questions just holla at me.

B
 

Avalon781ML

Well-Known Member
Just wanted to let y'all know..... Am Patrols is looking for one pilot.... details above.... ok job... nothing special about the job.... except adrenaline rushes are a daily experience...
Caveat emptor: To anyone who applies.... hope you like freakin' hot days and bouncing around.

B
 

todd405

Well-Known Member
I noticed the ad on climbto350 this evening. Sounds like a person could make some decent money out there. Do you know what is involved in the training process that takes 2-4 weeks?
 

SkyDogSilver

Well-Known Member
From what I remember when I went and spoke with them back in the day you earn the 8/hr while you ride along for how even long it takes for you to learn the routes/areas of patrol. So it all depends on how quickly you learn the patrol routes. Then when you feel ready and they feel confident to cut you loose out there alone you step up to the 18/hr and ask you to sign a 1 year contract.
It's all VFR only flying so don't go thinking you'll get any IFR actual time for your logbook. You might actually plan on some recurency training when you finish your year contract unless you keep current on your own time at a nearby field.
Like previously posted, you better have a solid stomach. It reaches into the 100s in the summer out in Midland and you are flying 500 feet or less to read numbers on the tops of the pump rigs. The area out there is flat. Sand and dry desert as far as the eye can see. So your banging your head on the roof, both windows open, sweating profusely, breathing the air that constantly smells like sulfur, digging oil field maps out from the rear seat, operating a handheld radio that connects you to the correct oil company, using your cell phone, and dodging cell towers while looking for wet spots on the ground to report.
It ain't a cushy job, but there is apparently potential to earn some good money. Not sure if the owner still does it, but he picks up the various contracts from the Department of Agriculture to do cloud seeding from time to time during certain months. So if you are in good with him and he likes your work, there is the potential that he might throw some additional work your way.
It's a good opportunity for a low time pilot that is willing to sign a one year contract. There are very few, if any, flying jobs for such a low timer that will pay this good and offer this much of a stable paycheck.
 

Avalon781ML

Well-Known Member
From what I remember when I went and spoke with them back in the day you earn the 8/hr while you ride along for how even long it takes for you to learn the routes/areas of patrol. So it all depends on how quickly you learn the patrol routes. Then when you feel ready and they feel confident to cut you loose out there alone you step up to the 18/hr and ask you to sign a 1 year contract.
It's all VFR only flying so don't go thinking you'll get any IFR actual time for your logbook. You might actually plan on some recurency training when you finish your year contract unless you keep current on your own time at a nearby field.
Like previously posted, you better have a solid stomach. It reaches into the 100s in the summer out in Midland and you are flying 500 feet or less to read numbers on the tops of the pump rigs. The area out there is flat. Sand and dry desert as far as the eye can see. So your banging your head on the roof, both windows open, sweating profusely, breathing the air that constantly smells like sulfur, digging oil field maps out from the rear seat, operating a handheld radio that connects you to the correct oil company, using your cell phone, and dodging cell towers while looking for wet spots on the ground to report.
It ain't a cushy job, but there is apparently potential to earn some good money. Not sure if the owner still does it, but he picks up the various contracts from the Department of Agriculture to do cloud seeding from time to time during certain months. So if you are in good with him and he likes your work, there is the potential that he might throw some additional work your way.
It's a good opportunity for a low time pilot that is willing to sign a one year contract. There are very few, if any, flying jobs for such a low timer that will pay this good and offer this much of a stable paycheck.
This is pretty dang acurate.... WX mod is gone... 1 year contract is true but it can be broken if you are willing to pay $600... training pay is 10/hr. Flying as much as we do will make you want to act like an old man.... early to bed and early to rise...
 

RICHARD5

Well-Known Member
I applied to them last year. Real nice folks, folks I wouldn't mind working with. But they were marginally helpful for housing, cost of living, ect. Internet search revealed QOL would be acceptable. A follow-up phone call revealed they have a maximum pilot weight of 200 lbs.

However, a friend of mine was told a different story after he applied: "We're oilmen first, pilots second. How much experience do you have working the oilfields?" Basically, you spot something, you're expected to fix it or to help out in that.
 

Avalon781ML

Well-Known Member
I applied to them last year. Real nice folks, folks I wouldn't mind working with. But they were marginally helpful for housing, cost of living, ect. Internet search revealed QOL would be acceptable. A follow-up phone call revealed they have a maximum pilot weight of 200 lbs.

However, a friend of mine was told a different story after he applied: "We're oilmen first, pilots second. How much experience do you have working the oilfields?" Basically, you spot something, you're expected to fix it or to help out in that.

Uhhh..... your friend is quite mistaken.... they just want the pilot to be familiar with the terminology associated with the oilfields. The guys on the ground who fix the leaks that you find are not the absolute brightest and best... so you need to be able to relate to them in terms that they know and understand.... ie oilfield terminology... spanish also helps quite a bit but definitely not a requirement. Also.... one of the owners who flies is in my opinion in excess in of 300 lbs.... so this weight requirement is bogus.

Any other questions?
 

tlove482

Well-Known Member
You won't be 300 lbs for long flying pipeline patrol in Texas. I drink a gallon of water a day flying. You don't need a bathroom break cause you sweat the water out.
 

RICHARD5

Well-Known Member
Well, the kind lady told me directly they have a max wt limit of 200 lbs.

As far as my friend, I trust him explictly. What was said to him I don't know because I wasn't there although I can assure you he wouldn't make it up. It kind of rubs me that you would say my friend was wrong. Perhaps a different choice of words would have been better. My friends are all professionals in their chosen fields, no losers here.
 

Avalon781ML

Well-Known Member
You won't be 300 lbs for long flying pipeline patrol in Texas. I drink a gallon of water a day flying. You don't need a bathroom break cause you sweat the water out.
Well..... he has been doing this for about 8 years... and has only gained weight according to him.... maybe its just a bad diet.... IDK... you do sweat a whole heap.... schedule is five on two off... your weekend could be any two days of the week however.... not strictly sat sun... those are usually reserved for the more senior pilots.
 

Avalon781ML

Well-Known Member
Well, the kind lady told me directly they have a max wt limit of 200 lbs.

As far as my friend, I trust him explictly. What was said to him I don't know because I wasn't there although I can assure you he wouldn't make it up. It kind of rubs me that you would say my friend was wrong. Perhaps a different choice of words would have been better. My friends are all professionals in their chosen fields, no losers here.
Well.... I don't know what to say then.... I weigh more than 200.... I am sorry that it rubs you the wrong way but I speak the truth.... I did not say anyone is a loser, failure, or anything of the kind.... but I absolutely will not mince words. I wish y'all the best in whatever you are doing..... we are all professionals in our chosen fields.
 
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