NTSB Issues Investigative Update on Piper In-Flight Breakup - Terrifying.......

MidlifeFlyer

Well-Known Member
#5
This is unfortunate :(

It's also consistent with the view of some flight school operators that they won't do spin training in their old 152s, 172s and PA28s. It's not the spins that concerns them, but the stresses of learning recoveries on older aircraft.
 

Soku39

Well-Known Member
#6
This is unfortunate :(

It's also consistent with the view of some flight school operators that they won't do spin training in their old 152s, 172s and PA28s. It's not the spins that concerns them, but the stresses of learning recoveries on older aircraft.
Was this an older aircraft though? It certainly makes me hesitant.
 

MidlifeFlyer

Well-Known Member
#7
Was this an older aircraft though? It certainly makes me hesitant.
Not that old as these things go. It was a 2007 Arrow. But age isn't just about years. This was a trainer. According to the report, it had almost 7,700 airframe hours and over 33,000 "cycles," which the NTSB defines as 1 takeoff and 1 landing. Whether that was a major factor I don't know. The latest report talks about investigating this and getting mixed results.
 

Roger Roger

Paid to sleep, fly for fun
#8
Not that old as these things go. It was a 2007 Arrow. But age isn't just about years. This was a trainer. According to the report, it had almost 7,700 airframe hours and over 33,000 "cycles," which the NTSB defines as 1 takeoff and 1 landing. Whether that was a major factor I don't know. The latest report talks about investigating this and getting mixed results.
With as many aircraft as are out there with this wing design, and how rare breakups have been, I stand by my statement that there must have been some sort of factor beyond normal use. Whether the NTSB will be able to determine that or not will be interesting to see.
 
#9
In Canada we had to learn, and be tested on spins.
You don't see the same wing failures like this arrow.

I stand by @Roger Roger, in that thousands of spins and recoveries (well inside the designed load limit) is not a casual factor here.
 
#10
With as many aircraft as are out there with this wing design, and how rare breakups have been, I stand by my statement that there must have been some sort of factor beyond normal use. Whether the NTSB will be able to determine that or not will be interesting to see.
If I were a betting man, I'd say that the factor beyond normal use is the operator in this case, and how their program is ran...
 

Boris Badenov

He comes to save the day in a broken truck.
#17
Nah, Boris is the hard-up, chain smoking reporter for the local rag waiting in dark alleys for his sources to spill a lead.
OK, Fine. YOU REALLY EXPECT ME TO BELIEVE THAT? COME ON, GIMME A BREAK WHYDONTCHA? YOU KNOW THE MAYOR WILL NEVER SIGN OFF ON THAT WITHOUT HIS DONORS! I THOUGHT YOU WERE ONE OF THE GOOD GUYS, ROGER...I GUESS YOU'RE JUST ANOTHER COP ON THE TAKE. THE PEOPLE HAVE A RIGHT TO KNOW!

Hey wait a minute, I'm pretty sure I know how this ends for my character. HE SET ME UP!
 

jynxyjoe

The Kickin' Chicken!
#18
OK, Fine. YOU REALLY EXPECT ME TO BELIEVE THAT? COME ON, GIMME A BREAK WHYDONTCHA? YOU KNOW THE MAYOR WILL NEVER SIGN OFF ON THAT WITHOUT HIS DONORS! I THOUGHT YOU WERE ONE OF THE GOOD GUYS, ROGER...I GUESS YOU'RE JUST ANOTHER COP ON THE TAKE. THE PEOPLE HAVE A RIGHT TO KNOW!

Hey wait a minute, I'm pretty sure I know how this ends for my character. HE SET ME UP!
*Makes monkey noises, realizing he can't speak english. Signs something hastily at Boris and then Roger.*
 
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