NRS Waypoints

4EngineETOPS

Well-Known Member
Many of the people I work with are under the impression that NRS (Navigation Reference System) waypoints are only available above FL390 under the NRR (Non-Restrictive Routing) program. NRS waypoints are the 5 character waypoints starting with K (i.e. KP06K) that are spaced out in a grid across the U.S. As far as I know, these waypoints are usable at any normal cruising altitude as part of a route string. The waypoints were initially introduced in the early 2000s as part of the NRR program, which specified that aircraft flying above FL390 could use these waypoints. However, as far as I know, they are currently just part of the overall waypoint structure (VORs, airway intersections, RNAV waypoints, etc) available for direct routes. I see a lot of 121 carriers filing these waypoints and they are even included in some FAA preferred routes. Given that using them can make for a more efficient route, I'm curious if anyone actually uses these waypoints on a regular basis and if the NRR program is actually obsolete. The FAA is really good at vaguely documenting programs and initiatives in various stages of use.
 

757Geek

Well-Known Member
I’m at a legacy and I file them all time at various altitudes above and below FL390. Don’t remember seeing too many during my regional days though.
 

flynryan692

Well-Known Member
Our little lawn darts aren't allowed above FL370 and I file them using NRS waypoints all the time. I find they are extremely useful when I am planning around thunderstorms.
 

belgiumania

Well-Known Member
At this point NRS waypoints are fair game. You're not going to have issues filing them just about anywhere.

AIM guidance does still say that you shouldn't file Lat/Longs over the CONUS below FL390. Maybe people are confusing the two?
 

Mainline_or_bust

Airplanes fly on PFM, Change my mind
Jeppesen enroute text will have some info on them but I know where you are and we didn’t use them there that I remember. Where I work now it’s common to use them west of the Mississippi only. It’s FL370 and above I believe, just file and watch for Reggie. Or maybe phone call avoidance because of where you are and don’t worry about it :biggrin:
 

McCrosky

Well-Known Member
Many of the people I work with are under the impression that NRS (Navigation Reference System) waypoints are only available above FL390 under the NRR (Non-Restrictive Routing) program. NRS waypoints are the 5 character waypoints starting with K (i.e. KP06K) that are spaced out in a grid across the U.S. As far as I know, these waypoints are usable at any normal cruising altitude as part of a route string. The waypoints were initially introduced in the early 2000s as part of the NRR program, which specified that aircraft flying above FL390 could use these waypoints. However, as far as I know, they are currently just part of the overall waypoint structure (VORs, airway intersections, RNAV waypoints, etc) available for direct routes. I see a lot of 121 carriers filing these waypoints and they are even included in some FAA preferred routes. Given that using them can make for a more efficient route, I'm curious if anyone actually uses these waypoints on a regular basis and if the NRR program is actually obsolete. The FAA is really good at vaguely documenting programs and initiatives in various stages of use.
Initially during the rollout they started at or above FL390. And first introduce in the northwest quadrant of the country. They were expanded and the floor lowered. I don’t know what the lowest is currently, but I want to say it’s around FL290 ish. Our flight planning system won’t allow planning them below certain altitudes.
 

4EngineETOPS

Well-Known Member
I think the main issue is that the FAA doesn't update their publications very well. Both the AIM and Jepps mention NRS waypoints only within the context of NRR at or above FL390. The answers above further solidify what I thought was right before (thanks to everyone for their responses). Would be nice if the FAA could go over the AIM/AIP and other sources of official information to remove outdated data. I shouldn't have to spend 45 minutes or more searching for an answer and then resort to posting on a forum to find out whether or not I can use a waypoint.
 
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