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No, your emotional support hedgehog can't fly American Airlines with you anymore

ATN_Pilot

Socialist Pig Member
#41
I get it - you’re on the spectrum so it makes human relationships difficult. No hard feelings
I’d say someone who goes around advocating for the murder of living things is likely a sociopath. So if I’m on the spectrum (I’m not, but okay), then I’d say I’m still the one in better shape.
 

jynxyjoe

The Kickin' Chicken!
#44
I get it - you’re on the spectrum so it makes human relationships difficult. No hard feelings
While he may go full sith at times (he has mentioned now he likes the prequels which- God how?) We are all on the spectrum and I would ask you; is that how we talk to each other? Common maaaaaaaan. (Monday night football ref)
 

jynxyjoe

The Kickin' Chicken!
#49
Hey now, don’t tar me with that! :) I like only the third one. The first one was only tolerable, and the second one should be buried deep in the ground, never to be seen again. Like nuclear waste.
As hyperbole only, saying you liked Uday more than Saddam or Huessay still means you're a fundamentally bad person. They're all murdering rapist, of my childhood. Okay hyperbole is going into histrionics so ill stop.
I would say that’s why you should never call.
Anti cop now too hu?

*Work the body work the body*
 

Murdoughnut

Well sized member
#51
My mistake, thought you did.

Look, I'm not anti-animal at all, but I think an obvious fault of we liberals is that we tend to believe that all creatures (human or animal) are capable of being rehabilitated to deny their physiological wiring. It's the reason so many pitbulls snap all of a sudden, much to the complete shock of owners who, despite what many want to believe, weren't abusive or negligent in their care for the animal in all cases. The knee jerk reaction is always that it's bad owners, but having raised human twins, and having had at least a dozen cats and four or five dogs in my life has taught me that some behaviors are just hard wired in DNA, and you can only contain or control them to an extent.

A wise man who taught one of my new parent classes once told us that if a dog ever snaps or growls at your kid, you should put them down without a second thought. This was a guy who lived in a rural area, and had several dogs of his own. Wish I would have listened to his advice with my own dog and spared a dog on death row without such issues.
 

ATN_Pilot

Socialist Pig Member
#53
My mistake, thought you did.

Look, I'm not anti-animal at all, but I think an obvious fault of we liberals is that we tend to believe that all creatures (human or animal) are capable of being rehabilitated to deny their physiological wiring. It's the reason so many pitbulls snap all of a sudden, much to the complete shock of owners who, despite what many want to believe, weren't abusive or negligent in their care for the animal in all cases. The knee jerk reaction is always that it's bad owners, but having raised human twins, and having had at least a dozen cats and four or five dogs in my life has taught me that some behaviors are just hard wired in DNA, and you can only contain or control them to an extent.

A wise man who taught one of my new parent classes once told us that if a dog ever snaps or growls at your kid, you should put them down without a second thought. This was a guy who lived in a rural area, and had several dogs of his own. Wish I would have listened to his advice with my own dog and spared a dog on death row without such issues.
Pure ignorance and traces of sociopathy. We’re done here.
 

Cptnchia

Dissatisfied Customer
#54
A wise man who taught one of my new parent classes once told us that if a dog ever snaps or growls at your kid, you should put them down without a second thought. This was a guy who lived in a rural area, and had several dogs of his own. Wish I would have listened to his advice with my own dog and spared a dog on death row without such issues.
Yeah, I gotta lean Todd’s way in this. Having raised both kids, dogs, and trained service dogs just because a dog growls at a kid isn’t reason to put it down. You just need to use some of that preprogrammed DNA stuff you mentioned. Teach the dog it’s place in the pack hierarchy.

Correct the dog like any alpha would. Watch how a dog corrects another. I’ve held down dogs and bit them, and I’ve used training collars. By the time my kids were mobile and capable of approaching the dogs when they were eating, the kids could take any food bowl away from any dog without issues because they were higher in the pack. The kids were also taught how to properly respond and correct the dog to reinforce the hierarchy.

I think the issue with dogs who act out is their humans. They either think of the dog as human and attempt to treat it that way, or more importantly, don’t take the time to properly teach the dog.

Dogs are dogs. They think humans are dogs too. One big pack. Deal with them from that perspective and there are no issues.
 
#55
Then both of you should take a few minutes to do a little research and educate yourself on why dogs are so invaluable for those who suffer with PTSD and traumatic brain injuries for example. They deserve to lead as normal a life as possible, and that includes the ability to travel.

https://www.rover.com/blog/ptsd-service-therapy-dogs/

http://www.canines4hope.com/post-traumatic-stress-disorder-dogs-ptsd-dog-training-florida.htm

https://www.mercurynews.com/2018/03/27/for-military-veterans-are-ptsd-service-dogs-good-therapy/

WEST LAFAYETTE, Ind. (WISH) - Purdue University is at work to find the scientific ways service dogs help veterans who suffer from Post Traumatic Stress Disorder. The university recently completed a pilot study looking into the issue.

Up until this point there has been limited research on the how and why service dogs are believed to help PTSD symptoms.

"It's not a cure. I think some people come into this thinking that the dog is magic and that PTSD will be gone once they have the dog but our data shows that it's certainly not a cure but that it will substantially reduce symptoms for individuals," said Assistant Professor of Human-Animal Interaction Maggie O’Haire.

The study was led by O’Haire. She said prior to the study there was a lot of anecdotal info and great stories but no science behind it.

Purdue partnered with K9s For Warriors, which a service-dog provider based out of Florida.

The study focused on scientific evidence and the effects the dogs have on the veterans and their spouses.

What they found is that those who have a service dog had significantly lower symptoms of PTSD, lower depression, better quality of life, and were able to get out of their house and interact more often.

"Some of these things the dogs will do is wake the person up from a nightmare because we know that nightmares and experiencing that trauma again can be very stressful. So the dog will actually wake up the individual from a nightmare or calm them down once they have woken up," said O’Haire.

The results were a result of standardized surveys taken by the 141 veterans studied. Half of them had service dogs and the other half did not.

"When they're out in public they will lean against the person so the person can feel more centered. They might stand in between the veteran and another human being so the veteran feels safer or watch their back when they're in public so they don't have the fear that someone is going to come up behind them and get them."

She added that when the veterans were doing their treatment as usual, there really were not any changes in their PTSD. It was only after only after they got the dog that the symptoms were reduced.

The study took about two years to complete and is now published in the Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology.

Next, Purdue researchers hope to do a larger scale study that will be funded through the National Institute of Health. They will focus on physiological changes by studying cortisol levels, sleep, and activity in both the animals and veterans. The findings could lead to future changes in policy.

"The Veteran's Administration won't fund these dogs because there's no science behind it so I think that some individuals hope that there will be policy change to support these as a valid, medical need for the individuals who need them," she said.


http://www.wishtv.com/news/local-ne...eterans-with-ptsd-new-study-says-1/1109246216
Only somewhat related, but have you read the book “Craig and Fred?” Just finished it and it seemed right up your alley.
 
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#56
My mistake, thought you did.

Look, I'm not anti-animal at all, but I think an obvious fault of we liberals is that we tend to believe that all creatures (human or animal) are capable of being rehabilitated to deny their physiological wiring. It's the reason so many pitbulls snap all of a sudden, much to the complete shock of owners who, despite what many want to believe, weren't abusive or negligent in their care for the animal in all cases. The knee jerk reaction is always that it's bad owners, but having raised human twins, and having had at least a dozen cats and four or five dogs in my life has taught me that some behaviors are just hard wired in DNA, and you can only contain or control them to an extent.

A wise man who taught one of my new parent classes once told us that if a dog ever snaps or growls at your kid, you should put them down without a second thought. This was a guy who lived in a rural area, and had several dogs of his own. Wish I would have listened to his advice with my own dog and spared a dog on death row without such issues.
You are an odd duck.
 
#57
Only somewhat related, but have you read the book “Craig and Fred?” Just finished it and it seemed right up your alley.
Never even heard of it before. Looked it up on Amazon and going to order it. "A Marine, A Stray Dog, and How They Rescued Each Other." And that is exactly what happens. We are in our 4th year of rescuing dogs from shelters, training them and giving them to Vets with PTSD and traumatic brain injuries. I have seen with my own eyes what these dogs can do, how they change the lives of Vets and how Vets can be healed by them. They have saved many, many lives and given Vets, real hope and a second chance to drastically improve the quality of their lives.

The VA was ordered by Congress to study the effect of dogs and Vets with traumatic brain injuries and PTSD. In typical VA fashion, they ignored Congress, dragged their asses, started a study on two different occasions and then dropped the study. It's become very political and a matter of money since the VA refuses to pay for these dogs. They started yet a third study with a very small sampling of Vets and who knows what year they will finish it. I don't even trust them to give truthful findings as they have a long history of kicking the can down the road and ignoring serious and real diseases that Vets have experienced from exposure to chemicals and more. Decades later, Vets are still fighting for their benefits. The recent Purdue study however, proves and reaffirms how valuable dogs are to Vets in need and they had a sampling of over 200 Vets who participated in the study. The National Institute of Health is in also the middle of it's own study which will conclude next year.

Thankfully, there are now dozens of organizations across the country who rescue dogs, train them and give them over to Vets at no cost. Every single person involved in this endeavor has had the same experiences in witnessing the healing that dogs can do and how the lives of Veterans are vastly improved/bettered by these dogs. The dogs are the bridge for a Vet. They provide security, comfort and unconditional love 24/7. They can also be trained to perform certain tasks such as waking a Vet who is having nightmares, calming the Vet if he gets agitated, helping them to be outdoors and to participate in social settings, someone to talk to/relate to who never judges them, giving the Vet another life to take care of and nurture, or even keeping a small safe space around a Vet when he is in a public setting. One symptom of PTSD is hyperarousal, which can include a constant feeling of being on guard. A dog will provide a sense of calm and safety that helps Veterans reengage with the world. Dogs can even be taught to remind Vets to take their medications.

Thanks for telling me about this book.
 
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#58
Yeah, I gotta lean Todd’s way in this. Having raised both kids, dogs, and trained service dogs just because a dog growls at a kid isn’t reason to put it down. You just need to use some of that preprogrammed DNA stuff you mentioned. Teach the dog it’s place in the pack hierarchy.

Correct the dog like any alpha would. Watch how a dog corrects another. I’ve held down dogs and bit them, and I’ve used training collars. By the time my kids were mobile and capable of approaching the dogs when they were eating, the kids could take any food bowl away from any dog without issues because they were higher in the pack. The kids were also taught how to properly respond and correct the dog to reinforce the hierarchy.

I think the issue with dogs who act out is their humans. They either think of the dog as human and attempt to treat it that way, or more importantly, don’t take the time to properly teach the dog.

Dogs are dogs. They think humans are dogs too. One big pack. Deal with them from that perspective and there are no issues.
Many people are terrible dog owners and haven't a clue how to train a dog, what the relationship is with a dog and humans, refuse to take the dog in for training because they are too lazy and uninvolved and worse.....they create a lot of behaviors that are not good for the dog and then wonder why their dog acts up, misbehaves or lashes out. Bad owners take no responsibility for anything, even their own lousy behavior and attitude. They also ignore bad behavior from the dog for years and then at some point decide it's all the dog's fault. It's so much easier for their crappy owners to just murder the dog or dump it at a shelter. Most of them don't even bother to seek out a no kill shelter with trainers on hand who can rehabilitate the dog and find it a proper home with people who are responsible and understand how to be good dog companions. Sadly, we've seen several examples of bad/clueless owners right on this forum over the years.
 
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