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No, your emotional support hedgehog can't fly American Airlines with you anymore

#23
Trained real service animals are a different thing. But never for emotional support, even though there are trained emotional support dogs. If you need that you're not in a mental state to be on public transit, specifically air transit where we can't just let you off if you cause a major disturbance.
#zachfacts
 

Murdoughnut

Well sized member
#25
For the record, many times when a dog bites a child it's because the child does something stupid to the dog. If only parents trained their children better:

1 - never pet a dog that's not yours unless you specifically ask the owner if it's OK
2 - despite what most stupid people do the vast majority of dog's don't like being pet on the head, especially by strangers - scratch the rear ;)
3 - lots of dogs are raised in adults only homes and are never around kids - so when your weird ass kid comes up screaming and slapping it on the head without the owners permission the dog is confused, scared, and gets defensive

You know how many times I've seen dumb kids keep getting closer and closer to a dog that's GROWLING at them?
This is a common response I hear from people. As someone whose son was bit by a dog, I scoff at the idea that any animal that would bite a child who might reach out to pet them (or who happens to get between them and their food) should be permitted in public spaces - let alone on an aircraft.

If your dog isn't comfortable around kids or other people, leave it at home, or better yet, put it down.
 

ATN_Pilot

Socialist Pig Member
#26
This is a common response I hear from people. As someone whose son was bit by a dog, I scoff at the idea that any animal that would bite a child who might reach out to pet them (or who happens to get between them and their food) should be permitted in public spaces - let alone on an aircraft.

If your dog isn't comfortable around kids or other people, leave it at home, or better yet, put it down.
How ‘bout you put your kid down instead?
 

GoDawgsGo

Well-Known Member
#33
This is a common response I hear from people. As someone whose son was bit by a dog, I scoff at the idea that any animal that would bite a child who might reach out to pet them (or who happens to get between them and their food) should be permitted in public spaces - let alone on an aircraft.

If your dog isn't comfortable around kids or other people, leave it at home, or better yet, put it down.
Good luck finding where I said anything about letting untrained dogs in airports or on planes. In fact, I said the exact opposite.
 

BigZ

Well-Known Member
#35
He deserved it. Suggesting someone kill their dog is absolutely despicable.
It's not. We had to put our dog down because she would go zero to biting in split second with no growling or any warning.
We loved her, she loved us, having to put her to sleep broke my heart and I now have a no pet policy.
However, if you're honest with yourself, you will eventually run out of excuses as for why you think the dog bit someone.
Dog may very well be a member of your family - great, keep that dog at home if you can create an environment where it won't bite anyone. Your pet isn't anyone else's concern, don't be dragging it around the airports or any other public areas.
 

ATN_Pilot

Socialist Pig Member
#36
No your point was and has been dogs have more value.
No, I’ve always said that dogs are better than people. That’s a different question than the value of a life, of which I have always said that all life is equally valuable. Suggesting that someone murder their dog is no different than suggesting someone murder their child.
 

jynxyjoe

The Kickin' Chicken!
#37
No, I’ve always said that dogs are better than people. That’s a different question than the value of a life, of which I have always said that all life is equally valuable. Suggesting that someone murder their dog is no different than suggesting someone murder their child.
Ah. Gotcha.
 

A Life Aloft

Live Free or Die
#39
I don't understand why they allow emotional support animals to begin with. If it's not a service animal it doesn't belong in the cabin.
If I have a medical condition, I cannot and would not expect the airline to take rediculous measures and inconvenience all of the other passengers for me. It is one of the crappier parts of American culture that we all think the world revolves around us individually.
Say I had a detached retina and could not subject my eyes to pressure changes. Can I demand the flight be flown with a sea level cabin? Or should I just not fly with my medical condition?
Then both of you should take a few minutes to do a little research and educate yourself on why dogs are so invaluable for those who suffer with PTSD and traumatic brain injuries for example. They deserve to lead as normal a life as possible, and that includes the ability to travel.

https://www.rover.com/blog/ptsd-service-therapy-dogs/

http://www.canines4hope.com/post-traumatic-stress-disorder-dogs-ptsd-dog-training-florida.htm

https://www.mercurynews.com/2018/03/27/for-military-veterans-are-ptsd-service-dogs-good-therapy/

WEST LAFAYETTE, Ind. (WISH) - Purdue University is at work to find the scientific ways service dogs help veterans who suffer from Post Traumatic Stress Disorder. The university recently completed a pilot study looking into the issue.

Up until this point there has been limited research on the how and why service dogs are believed to help PTSD symptoms.

"It's not a cure. I think some people come into this thinking that the dog is magic and that PTSD will be gone once they have the dog but our data shows that it's certainly not a cure but that it will substantially reduce symptoms for individuals," said Assistant Professor of Human-Animal Interaction Maggie O’Haire.

The study was led by O’Haire. She said prior to the study there was a lot of anecdotal info and great stories but no science behind it.

Purdue partnered with K9s For Warriors, which a service-dog provider based out of Florida.

The study focused on scientific evidence and the effects the dogs have on the veterans and their spouses.

What they found is that those who have a service dog had significantly lower symptoms of PTSD, lower depression, better quality of life, and were able to get out of their house and interact more often.

"Some of these things the dogs will do is wake the person up from a nightmare because we know that nightmares and experiencing that trauma again can be very stressful. So the dog will actually wake up the individual from a nightmare or calm them down once they have woken up," said O’Haire.

The results were a result of standardized surveys taken by the 141 veterans studied. Half of them had service dogs and the other half did not.

"When they're out in public they will lean against the person so the person can feel more centered. They might stand in between the veteran and another human being so the veteran feels safer or watch their back when they're in public so they don't have the fear that someone is going to come up behind them and get them."

She added that when the veterans were doing their treatment as usual, there really were not any changes in their PTSD. It was only after only after they got the dog that the symptoms were reduced.

The study took about two years to complete and is now published in the Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology.

Next, Purdue researchers hope to do a larger scale study that will be funded through the National Institute of Health. They will focus on physiological changes by studying cortisol levels, sleep, and activity in both the animals and veterans. The findings could lead to future changes in policy.

"The Veteran's Administration won't fund these dogs because there's no science behind it so I think that some individuals hope that there will be policy change to support these as a valid, medical need for the individuals who need them," she said.


http://www.wishtv.com/news/local-ne...eterans-with-ptsd-new-study-says-1/1109246216
 
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