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No, your emotional support hedgehog can't fly American Airlines with you anymore

Oxman

Well-Known Member
#1
Good. What people have been claiming has got out of control.

http://www.nydailynews.com/life-sty...gehog-fly-american-airlines-article-1.3991502

American Airlines is putting its fins, feathers and phalanges down with its passengers' emotional support pets.

Fliers can no longer claim they need their ferrets, goats, hedgehogs and spiders to ride shotgun with them, according to a statement released by the airline on Monday. That's thanks to the mounting number of incidents and creatures — like a peacock — that people say they can't be without; a total that increased by 40% from 2016 to 2017, the carrier said.

Starting on all flights after July 1 of this year, an emotional support animal "must meet a set of enhanced requirements," in order to fly.
"Emotional support and service animals must be trained to behave properly in public; they must be tethered by leash and/or harness and under your control at all times," the statement reads. "Animals won't be permitted in the cabin if they display any form of disruptive behavior that can't be successfully corrected or controlled, including but not limited to: growling, biting or attempting to bite, jumping on or lunging at people."

If an animal does any of the above at any point during the flight, it will then be considered just a "pet" and will be treated like one — fees included.
But even if a passenger somehow manages to get her tree frog to sit on command, AA compiled a list of animals that serve safety or health risks and "can't be permitted as service or emotional support animals."

The full list includes amphibians, ferrets, goats, hedgehogs, insects, reptiles, rodents, snakes, spiders, sugar gliders, farm poultry, waterfowl, game birds and birds of prey (sorry, vultures), anything with tusks, horns or hooves — except, of course, properly trained mini horses(!), — and anything "unclean" or that "has an odor."
 

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GoDawgsGo

Well-Known Member
#8
I agree. If you need an animal to be with you to fly, you're not emotionally stable enough to ride public transportation.
Overall I'd agree with that sentiment, but maybe not so black and white. I don't disagree with your logic, but I'm coming at it more from an animal training perspective. Service animals are professionally trained and can cost a lot of money. Right now any schmuck can register their lizard online as an emotional support animal and they can print a certificate saying so. Call it service or emotional support, either way it should be on the passenger to prove the dog has been professionally trained and can handle being around thousands of strangers in a busy airport and on a plane.
 

GoDawgsGo

Well-Known Member
#10
Nope, don't read any stories in my morning ops report about children biting dogs in the airport or on aircraft.
For the record, many times when a dog bites a child it's because the child does something stupid to the dog. If only parents trained their children better:

1 - never pet a dog that's not yours unless you specifically ask the owner if it's OK
2 - despite what most stupid people do the vast majority of dog's don't like being pet on the head, especially by strangers - scratch the rear ;)
3 - lots of dogs are raised in adults only homes and are never around kids - so when your weird ass kid comes up screaming and slapping it on the head without the owners permission the dog is confused, scared, and gets defensive

You know how many times I've seen dumb kids keep getting closer and closer to a dog that's GROWLING at them?
 

ATN_Pilot

Socialist Pig Member
#11
In other words, the number of dog bites is actually incredible low. Imagine, if you will, how many people would be punched in the f’n face if random people constantly walked up and started rubbing other people on their heads without permission. The incredibly low number of dog bites is a testament to how much dogs are better than people.
 

z987k

Well-Known Member
#12
Overall I'd agree with that sentiment, but maybe not so black and white. I don't disagree with your logic, but I'm coming at it more from an animal training perspective. Service animals are professionally trained and can cost a lot of money. Right now any schmuck can register their lizard online as an emotional support animal and they can print a certificate saying so. Call it service or emotional support, either way it should be on the passenger to prove the dog has been professionally trained and can handle being around thousands of strangers in a busy airport and on a plane.
Trained real service animals are a different thing. But never for emotional support, even though there are trained emotional support dogs. If you need that you're not in a mental state to be on public transit, specifically air transit where we can't just let you off if you cause a major disturbance.
 

ATN_Pilot

Socialist Pig Member
#13
Trained real service animals are a different thing. But never for emotional support, even though there are trained emotional support dogs. If you need that you're not in a mental state to be on public transit, specifically air transit where we can't just let you off if you cause a major disturbance.
:rolleyes:
 

z987k

Well-Known Member
#14
If I have a medical condition, I cannot and would not expect the airline to take rediculous measures and inconvenience all of the other passengers for me. It is one of the crappier parts of American culture that we all think the world revolves around us individually.
Say I had a detached retina and could not subject my eyes to pressure changes. Can I demand the flight be flown with a sea level cabin? Or should I just not fly with my medical condition?
 

ATN_Pilot

Socialist Pig Member
#15
If I have a medical condition, I cannot and would not expect the airline to take rediculous measures and inconvenience all of the other passengers for me. It is one of the crappier parts of American culture that we all think the world revolves around us individually.
Say I had a detached retina and could not subject my eyes to pressure changes. Can I demand the flight be flown with a sea level cabin? Or should I just not fly with my medical condition?
Analogies aren’t your thing, huh? Flying at a sea level cabin would require operating the aircraft at an inefficient altitude, costing the airline a boatload of money. Allowing a disabled passenger (yes, anxiety is a mental disability) a reasonable accommodation is not in any way comparable.

In the housing industry, this isn’t even a question. The law is clear: reasonable accommodation is mandatory. Refusing to allow an emotional support animal will cost you tens of thousands in fines and legal fees. Everyone else should abide by the same rules.
 

z987k

Well-Known Member
#16
Analogies aren’t your thing, huh? Flying at a sea level cabin would require operating the aircraft at an inefficient altitude, costing the airline a boatload of money. Allowing a disabled passenger (yes, anxiety is a mental disability) a reasonable accommodation is not in any way comparable.

In the housing industry, this isn’t even a question. The law is clear: reasonable accommodation is mandatory. Refusing to allow an emotional support animal will cost you tens of thousands in fines and legal fees. Everyone else should abide by the same rules.
You can make a greater argument that the animal is a greater risk to safety than flying at 15 for cruise. Especially since we know most of these animals are barely trained pets.