NetJets orders more airplanes.....again

ZapBrannigan

Old School
I don't work for a fractional, but I am corporate and I can say that our passengers treat us very well. They are extremely low maintenance. Company culture is such that when it comes to safety decisions, the pilots word is law. So there is never any pressure to operate when it is unsafe to do so. (We have an SOP to back us up if it ever happens)
 

JDE

Well-Known Member
I don't work for a fractional, but I am corporate and I can say that our passengers treat us very well. They are extremely low maintenance. Company culture is such that when it comes to safety decisions, the pilots word is law. So there is never any pressure to operate when it is unsafe to do so. (We have an SOP to back us up if it ever happens)
:yeahthat:


If you get at a good company, it's a great job, but there are always bad jobs out there, you just have to be selective.
 

hilltop101

New Member
Many of these airplanes are not really new orders. They will be replacing the aging fleet of Gulfstreams that Netjets currently has. Many fractional jet owners buy into a new aircraft and expect to be on new aircraft therefore it is important to keep the overall age of the fleet low since the owners fly on the whole fleet and not just the aircraft they own.
 

Nick

Well-Known Member
How do you guys get treated by the owners? I just flew a trip with a former corporate G4 guy...his stories made me shudder. Is is that bad?
Not to sound argumentative but I am going to switch some words around and create a new sentence that would be a CEO asking a less important businessman who can't get a corporate jet to travel on:

"How do you guys get treated by the airlines? I just flew a trip with another CEO who used to airline around the country...his stories made me shudder. Is it that bad?"

* * *​

Of course there are enormous differences in cost when using NetJets vs. an airline. But there are some instances recently that I can think of where I am just baffled at how horrendous the treatment of passengers is sometimes. Just today I stood at the podium at one of the DC airports and two passengers came up to the gate agent; they were going to fly to the international hub in the northeast and go on to India in business class for a four-day business trip. They probably shelled out about $10,000 for airfare and they are now missing 25% of their time in Mumbai due to the northeast USA's constant groundstop nonsense.

The airlines are sending their high-end passengers to NetJets (the ones who can afford it that is).
 

SteveC

Really?
Staff member
How do you guys get treated by the owners? I just flew a trip with a former corporate G4 guy...his stories made me shudder. Is is that bad?
I don't fly for NetJets, but we have a small fractional program of our own, as well as flying managed aircraft for the owners, and some 135 charter. Speaking for my own experiences, the bad pax are very, very rare. Typically rather low maintenance individuals that are a pleasure to fly. We work hard to keep 'em happy, and they seem to appreciate the service.
 

surreal1221

Well-Known Member
Of course there are enormous differences in cost when using NetJets vs. an airline. But there are some instances recently that I can think of where I am just baffled at how horrendous the treatment of passengers is sometimes. Just today I stood at the podium at one of the DC airports and two passengers came up to the gate agent; they were going to fly to the international hub in the northeast and go on to India in business class for a four-day business trip. They probably shelled out about $10,000 for airfare and they are now missing 25% of their time in Mumbai due to the northeast USA's constant groundstop nonsense.

The airlines are sending their high-end passengers to NetJets (the ones who can afford it that is).
Just real quickly.

The airlines are not sending their high-end passengers to NetJets because of the constant NE charlie fox that you speak of (constant ground stop nonsense). At least not 100%, perhaps 50%.

50% of the blame also needs to fall onto the shoulders of our inept Federal Aviation Administration that has failed to improve the infrastruture that ALL USERS are utilizing (not just in the NE either).

What the airlines are doing though, are going after the lowest common denominator customer (cheap Joe Six Pack), as opposed to the ones they really want to keep and maintain - the business traveler. It's a shame, and they (the management team, not the pilots who work for them) are the ones to blame.
 

B767Driver

New Member
Not to sound argumentative but I am going to switch some words around and create a new sentence that would be a CEO asking a less important businessman who can't get a corporate jet to travel on:

"How do you guys get treated by the airlines? I just flew a trip with another CEO who used to airline around the country...his stories made me shudder. Is it that bad?"

* * *​

).
Oh yes, as an airline pilot I do my best, as often as I can, to belittle and intimidate my passengers. After all, they're just simple people and deserve to be reminded of their proper place, right?

Don't you understand that one issue is in regards to basic human nature and the other is about a taxed operational system?

Sheesh.
 

NJA_Capt

Well-Known Member
Many of these airplanes are not really new orders. They will be replacing the aging fleet of Gulfstreams that NetJets currently has.
Partially true. But if you look at the original Citation Excel order of 50 orders/50 options, the Excel fleet is now over 110 and growing.

How do you guys get treated by the owners? I just flew a trip with a former corporate G4 guy...his stories made me shudder. Is is that bad?
NetJets owners are the cream of the crop. They are dignified and treat us very well. They frequently ask if they can get us coffee during the flight.

Owners that fail to treat employees or aircraft in a professional manner are invited to leave the program.
 

ZapBrannigan

Old School
Keep in mind folks that NetJets is not a regional airline equivalent. It is a brass-ring job - on par with a major airline job.

Just as you would not expect a CFI or recent flight-school graduate to be hired by a major airline, so too would one not expect to be hired by Netjets fresh out of school or as a CFI.

Build your time the same way you would if your career goals were United, Delta, or Southwest. If the time comes that you look yourself in the mirror and are able to say:

"I don't CARE how big my airplane is."
"I don't CARE whether I fly overseas or just back and forth to Teterboro"
"I want honest pay for honest work."
"I want a good lifestyle with plenty of time off."
"I want benefits that meet or exceed those at the airlines."

Then make that step towards a NetJets interview understanding that working for NJA should not be considered a stepping stone, but rather a career destination.

-Zap (who does not work for NJA but is extremely impressed by their business model)
 

cime_sp

Well-Known Member
Keep in mind folks that NetJets is not a regional airline equivalent. It is a brass-ring job - on par with a major airline job.

Just as you would not expect a CFI or recent flight-school graduate to be hired by a major airline, so too would one not expect to be hired by Netjets fresh out of school or as a CFI.

Build your time the same way you would if your career goals were United, Delta, or Southwest. If the time comes that you look yourself in the mirror and are able to say:

"I don't CARE how big my airplane is."
"I don't CARE whether I fly overseas or just back and forth to Teterboro"
"I want honest pay for honest work."
"I want a good lifestyle with plenty of time off."
"I want benefits that meet or exceed those at the airlines."

Then make that step towards a NetJets interview understanding that working for NJA should not be considered a stepping stone, but rather a career destination.

-Zap (who does not work for NJA but is extremely impressed by their business model)
Hey NetJets.....Call Me!!! Mine is the resume in the middle of the pile that looks just like any of the other 10,000 you have on file. Thanks...
 

Patrick

Well-Known Member
Keep in mind folks that NetJets is not a regional airline equivalent. It is a brass-ring job - on par with a major airline job.

Just as you would not expect a CFI or recent flight-school graduate to be hired by a major airline, so too would one not expect to be hired by Netjets fresh out of school or as a CFI.

Build your time the same way you would if your career goals were United, Delta, or Southwest. If the time comes that you look yourself in the mirror and are able to say:

"I don't CARE how big my airplane is."
"I don't CARE whether I fly overseas or just back and forth to Teterboro"
"I want honest pay for honest work."
"I want a good lifestyle with plenty of time off."
"I want benefits that meet or exceed those at the airlines."

Then make that step towards a NetJets interview understanding that working for NJA should not be considered a stepping stone, but rather a career destination.

-Zap (who does not work for NJA but is extremely impressed by their business model)
Completely agree with this statement, and I would be very happy making a long term career at NJA once I'm able.
 

Boris Badenov

He comes to save the day in a broken truck.
Airlines going bankrupt left and right, pax shoehorned in like sardines, flip flops and soccer shorts the order of the day amongst the Great Unwashed. Meanwhile the flying limos of the ultrarich are flying off the shelves. But don't worry, the middle class isn't being destroyed...
 
Top