Navajo down in Cincinnati

Oxman

Well-Known Member
Video in link.


Better video..

Ashbrock said fire crews found the plane down in the backyard where it struck a remodeled extension of the house.
The plane was registered to a company in Brandon, MS.
There is no word on how many people were inside the plane.
Officials believe the plane was inbound to Lunken Airport, about 7 miles away, on a mission to take photographs of the area.


CINCINNATI-- A plane crashed into a backyard in Hamilton County Tuesday afternoon, killing the pilot.
Fire officials said the Piper Twin hit a remodeled extension of a house on Rollymeade Avenue in Madeira shortly after 3 p.m. It was on fire when emergency crews arrived.
Everyone in the home has been located, including two dogs. Authorities weren't certain if anyone besides the pilot was in the twin-engine Piper PA-31 Navajo, which seats up to six.
The plane was being used to take photos in the area and was en route to Cincinnati Municipal Lunken Airport.
Madeira is about 11 miles outside of Cincinnati.
The Federal Aviation Administration says federal investigators are responding and that the National Transportation Safety Board will be in charge.
 
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greg1016

Trustworthy Source
Using a Navajo for aerial photography? I wonder what type of photography calls for a twin?
We have a fleet of Navajos right now at my airport doing aerial survey. Even the companies that uses Cessnas that come in usually have a couple twins (usually Aztecs), I think it helps them recruit pilots since the crews would rotate in and out of the twins daily.
 

bimmerphile

SuperCritical™ Member
We have a fleet of Navajos right now at my airport doing aerial survey. Even the companies that uses Cessnas that come in usually have a couple twins (usually Aztecs), I think it helps them recruit pilots since the crews would rotate in and out of the twins daily.
It's definitely not a recruiting tool. Better payload, time to climb, speed and time on station (maybe, depending on the fuel system) than a single. They can operate at higher altitudes than singles can, without taking 70 minutes to climb in the summer.
 

bimmerphile

SuperCritical™ Member
The largest advantage to using twins is for high altitude ops and not having to worry as much for heat distortion due to exhaust or leaking fluids coming from the engine on a single getting on the lenses
hah, forgot about the second. Our T210s had holes cut in the side of the cowling with exhaust stack sticking off the turbo. Ironically, the oil line off the turbo was leaking and kept puking all over my lenses. Took quite a few attempts with contract mx to figure out where it was coming from
 

5Right_5Left

Well-Known Member
hah, forgot about the second. Our T210s had holes cut in the side of the cowling with exhaust stack sticking off the turbo. Ironically, the oil line off the turbo was leaking and kept puking all over my lenses. Took quite a few attempts with contract mx to figure out where it was coming from
Yea most of our singles had the Harley pipe exhausts that ran down the side past the hole which was great for that problem but they were hell on trying to hot start the planes after landing for fuel. Oil was definitely our biggest culprit for the the older 206's and 182's. I remember one trip where you could see distortion on the images within the first 30 mins of the day. Took a long time to figure that leak out.
 

bimmerphile

SuperCritical™ Member
Yea most of our singles had the Harley pipe exhausts that ran down the side past the hole which was great for that problem but they were hell on trying to hot start the planes after landing for fuel. Oil was definitely our biggest culprit for the the older 206's and 182's. I remember one trip where you could see distortion on the images within the first 30 mins of the day. Took a long time to figure that leak out.
Oh yeah the 206 was awful when hot. Never had huge problems with the 210. We had the stupid short stacks, it was maybe 8 inches long and dumped out well before the right door. Had to keep the CO monitor batteries topped off for that setup

Long story short, twins=grip it and rip it
singles=finicky pain in the butt that makes you refly your work because of QA issues
 

skyhawk340

Well-Known Member
My profile pic is flying this airplane taking off over ORL. I didn't know the pilot but I know the Marc Inc operation. I hope the FAA investigates and shuts them down. I can't imagine there is a sketchier operator running in the US.
 
The largest advantage to using twins is for high altitude ops and not having to worry as much for heat distortion due to exhaust or leaking fluids coming from the engine on a single getting on the lenses
Everything he said. Plus, I might add, in most of the places where you would be imagining, if you lost an engine, you'd be VSF without an extra one still spinning.

Some companies employ two-pilot, single-engine aircraft for imagining. That way the other pilot can fly you to the scene of the crash. ;)
 

STS-41B

Well-Known Member
It's definitely not a recruiting tool. Better payload, time to climb, speed and time on station (maybe, depending on the fuel system) than a single. They can operate at higher altitudes than singles can, without taking 70 minutes to climb in the summer.
actually it is PRIMARILY a recruiting tool.
 

Box hauler

Well-Known Member
Using a Navajo for aerial photography? I wonder what type of photography calls for a twin?
When I did it we used a Cessna 320. One reason was for speed because we would sometimes do 150 mile long lines and also altitude, did some projects at 22k in that bad boy.
 

STS-41B

Well-Known Member
aerial photography/mapping is/has been done from a 150 using an instamatic camera, to platforms on 172s and Aztecs, to Lidar sensors on Caravans and Navajos, to LearJets imaging from FL350.. to the space shuttle 3-D mapping the world (STS-59,68,99).

Don’t give me this “couldn't be photographing in a twin” BS.
#ignorant
 

bimmerphile

SuperCritical™ Member
actually it is PRIMARILY a recruiting tool.
aerial photography/mapping is/has been done from a 150 using an instamatic camera, to platforms on 172s and Aztecs, to Lidar sensors on Caravans and Navajos, to LearJets imaging from FL350.. to the space shuttle 3-D mapping the world (STS-59,68,99).

Don’t give me this “couldn't be photographing in a twin” BS.
#ignorant
most people hear "aerial photography" and think "guy in a cessna opening the window with an SLR"
stop being a jag off
 
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