Multi Time?

aviator

New Member
Well It's extremely hard at first when you have no expierence. After a couple hundred hours of dual you can usually move into the twins. That is if you are teaching at a school that does that kind of training. Multi students don't grow on trees and definently look for expierenced instructors.....
 

Alchemy

Partner, Ally, Friend
It all depends on where you work. My flight school has four instructors, and all but one are MEII's, so most people just do the multi with the same person they did all their other ratings with. The school has two twin trainers, and is the only school at the airport to offer multi engine training. The MEII's probably average 2 multi students per year a piece, which equates to about 30-35 hours multi time I suppose. I'm probably being optimistic.

My cfi, who has about 1500 hrs is at about 200 hrs multi time after 2 years of instructing, and he went to ATP for everything but his private. You probably get at least 150 hours multi at ATP, so he averages around 25/yr I guess.
 

EatSleepFly

Well-Known Member
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Just curious how hard it is to come up with multi time after you are an instructor?


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Heh, good question. I've been asking myself that all along. Instructing at an FBO with no multi whatsoever, I'll probably have to go try to fly night freight or something (fine by me, airlines aren't my thing anyways)- where I can start in a Caravan, and move up. I've got 70 multi, which isn't bad, but not nearly enough to be competitive. Oh well, I'll get it somehow...I'm not going to buy one more second of flight time though.
 

MikeD

Administrator
Staff member
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Just curious how hard it is to come up with multi time after you are an instructor?


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Heh, good question. I've been asking myself that all along. Instructing at an FBO with no multi whatsoever, I'll probably have to go try to fly night freight or something (fine by me, airlines aren't my thing anyways)- where I can start in a Caravan, and move up. I've got 70 multi, which isn't bad, but not nearly enough to be competitive. Oh well, I'll get it somehow...I'm not going to buy one more second of flight time though.


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It works. It's the route I took. After traffic pilot flying, went cargo in PA-32-300/32R-300s and C-207s. Moved up to C-208, then to PA-31. Was in line for Metro III Captain when the end came.
 

braidkid

New Member
Getting all your single engine ratings is the easy part. It's the multi time that presents your first great challenge being a pro pilot in my opinion. I have no idea how I'm going to get multi time. I plan on going to ATP this Christmas to get my multi-comm/CFII/MEI and do their 35 hour PIC program all for $7k. I figure after that I'll have a little over 35 hours multi. There aren't any multi instructing opportunities where I am so my plan is to buy a little multi time to keep current and God willing get on with a freight company in a few years (ie Airnet, ameriflight, flight express, GTA air, etc....) in order to build quality multi time.
 

carlos

Well-Known Member
If you haven't already completed your certificates and ratings, you might consider dong them in a multi. You could get your ASEL private, then immediately get your AMEL private. After that, get your instrument rating in the multi, and then your commercial AMEL. Then, get the ASEL commercial add-on. If you're Part 61, you could build 100+ hours of multi just during your training.

It's more expensive, for sure, but just the marginal difference between the single and the multi rental rates--that is, you are trading single hours for multi hours. This is basically what you do with ATP, Ari Ben, and MAPD, but you could structure a similar program at your local FBO. When you're finished with your training, you'll be a lot more attractive as an MEI with all those multi hours.
 

pilot602

If specified, this will replace the title that
The problem with doing it "backwards" (getting your AMEL private, IA and Comm in the twin) is that when you finally get your comm you're fairly unmarketable - at that level.

You can't fly jumpers, powerline patrols etc. because most of your first jobs, like the ones I've mentioned, (aside from CFI) are all single engine work.

So, like it was said, you then need to go back and get your CASEL add-on. Now, I suppose if you're renting it doesn't make much difference but for me we own the twin so to go rent an aircraft is kind of silly. So I'm working on my initial CFI/II in the twin and once I have those I'll go back and add the CASEL/CFI-ASEL ratings.

There's nothing wrong with doing everything in the multi first, but just don't expect to get much work at the entry level until you get the single-engine privileges.
 

pilot602

If specified, this will replace the title that
Cessna 300, or 304 - or I suppose you could even get a 302.*












150+150=300, etc.
 
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