multi-engine control

say_speed

New Member
Ok, has anybody here done a single engine take-off from brake release on a multi engine? I do not personaly know any light twin that has enough rudder authority to even keep the a/c on the runway... Any one knows an a/c that can do that?
 

NJA_Capt

Well-Known Member
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has anybody here done a single engine take-off from brake release on a multi engine? I do not personaly know any light twin that has enough rudder authority to even keep the a/c on the runway... Any one knows an a/c that can do that?

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FAR23 certificated aircraft are not required to able to take off single engine. FAR25 certificated aircraft only show they can continue with a failure above V1, not to acceleration to V1. To attempt one would qualify for 91.13.

A few years ago a fresh jet pilot couldn't get one of his engines started. He decided to takeoff with the good engine and light the other engine once he got the bad engine windmilling. Needless to say he and his passengers went off the other end of the runway. As a side note, most jet engines require 200+kts in order to "air" start.
 

C650CPT

Well-Known Member
ONLY in a SIM. It was not part of the POI, but we were ahead of syllabus and I snuck one in while the IP wasn't watching, boredom breeds contempt. I would NEVER attemp one in real life.
 

ERAU_Intern

New Member
DANGEROUS, and STOOPID!! That jet pilot who tried it must have never heard a word about safety in his life. Seriously, if you are curious about it, break out microsoft flight simulator and let-er-rip!
 

FL270

New Member
Like C-650, I did one in the simulator once, in the DC-9. Took off from a 12000' runway at slats/flaps 5 with one shut down, airplane rolled 12000', went off the end, and bounced another 3000' through the grass before we hit Vr. Instructor had us do it as an exercise to practice directional control for V1 cuts.

Under no circumstances would I ever attempt such a thing in any twin engine airplane.

The Falcon 50/900 three-engine airplanes are approved for two-engine ferry; I believe you shift the inop engine to the center position and go. Have never flown one, though, so that is hearsay.

FL270
 

say_speed

New Member
you braught a good point there, but I don't think that the falcon is approved for t/o with the center engine shut down...
Now I have heard that on the dc10, under certain wind conditions, crews used to shut the center one down in cruise and saved some fuel... Anybody knows if this is correct? I believe the air force did that a lot...
Maybe the falcons 3 engines have the same capability as well.
But I am glad to hear that not even a dc9 could do that (t/o on 1 engine), and I guess the crj could, at least in the sim...
 

viper548

Well-Known Member
The Air Force trying to save fuel? Can't be true. I've flown on an empty C-5 from Spain to Mass, and the next day flew a different empty one from Mass back to Spain. This happens all the time and the C-5 burns 20-25K PPH.
 

FalconCapt

New Member
The Falcon 50 & 900 can be ferried with an engine inop.

There are no 3 or 4 engine planes that shut down an engine in flight to save fuel. That is a myth. In the Falcon 900EX if we shut down an engine in flight we burn just as much fuel getting to our destination as we would with 3 engines, but it takes us longer to get there.
 

FalconCapt

New Member
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A few years ago a fresh jet pilot couldn't get one of his engines started. He decided to takeoff with the good engine and light the other engine once he got the bad engine windmilling. Needless to say he and his passengers went off the other end of the runway. As a side note, most jet engines require 200+kts in order to "air" start.

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This is an Urban Legend...
 

NJA_Capt

Well-Known Member
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This is an Urban Legend...

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Nope, all true. The NTSB write up was published AIN a year or two ago.
 
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