Moxy and 60 A220s

Cherokee_Cruiser

Well-Known Member
"Why should we hire you at (brand that claims it's any different)?"
"Because I will perform pilot services for currency."
"What attracts you about working at (brand that claims it's any different)?"
"The opportunity to perform pilot services for greater amounts of currency with additional time off for the same increments of currency."
"What do you dislike about your current employer?"
"The difference between the amount of pilot services I perform here and the currency and days off I would receive at this prospective employer."
"Do you have any questions?"
"When can I start performing pilot services for currency?"

etc.

tl;dr: cash rules err'thing around me

"Sorry, our airplanes Bernoulli principle works a little differently, you see our planes fly better when the pilots have volunteered to build a house and save a few kittens."

I had a FO recently tell me he interviewed at [large airline] and wasn't hired. 2008 recession passes and 5 yrs later they call back for a second interview when he applied. HR lady asked what have you done since? He was honest and said after the furloughs, he was the plug on the list and barely hanging onto his job. That his wife got a residency in a place in which they moved to and bought a house to start a family. Until the residency is over he has a 2 leg commute to reserve and has never missed work even with that. And in the little time he's at home, he's watching the newborn while the wife does the odd hours at residency.

Her response: "So you've done nothing..."

At that that point he said to please take me off your interview / applicant list and don't call me again. What he should have said is go eff yourself with a pineapple.





When one is single, you have all the time in the world and can easily volunteer a bunch with stuff that interests you. Then get married, and some of that free time goes down. Then have a kid and that free time goes down again. Then have a second kid, and that free time really goes way down. Throw a commute in there, and now your 10 days off/month are spent just trying to make sure your 2 kids know that they actually have a father.......

Yeah I'm sure there are people who can pull all that off and still volunteer. Still, I know *many* more who don't give two craps about the volunteer work they do, they are only doing it just to check a box on an application and fill in their achievement/work boxes on airlineapps. Whatever floats your boat, more power to ya. But for someone to marginalize your personal life when you're just hanging on trying to deal best with your life situation at that particular time, is a low move. They can take that job and shove it. Problem is, no pilot really gets that opportunity to be that total and brutal honest, as a guy above said. It's a game and you gotta play it to win it (unfortunately).
 

BigZ

Well-Known Member
At a certain legacy HQ the people have to volunteer however many times a year.
The way it works is you pick whatever aligns with your skills/desires/beliefs best from the company's suggested list, get a paid half a day off, company arranges transportation between the office and the event, you go do a good deed and bam - done. 1/X volunteering event crossed off of the list .
HR live in the same world and volunteer under the same rules, which is probably why there will never be any understanding there.
 

BigZ

Well-Known Member
This isn't volunteering, this is corporate virtue signaling
Doing something for nothing, because you as an individual are passionate about the cause, is volunteering.
Laying it as it is to try and help explain the perception differences.
Some projects they organized were very neat and would be hard to pull off without the corporate behemoth backing, but yeah.
 

bimmerphile

SuperCritical™ Member
Laying it as it is to try and help explain the perception differences.
Some projects they organized were very neat and would be hard to pull off without the corporate behemoth backing, but yeah.
Any time your employer requires you to volunteer, you are paid, and the company organizes the entire event, the company is just donating their resources to some cause. You are just being used for PR instead of your normal labor.
It's like buying a Subaru and having them donate $150 of the purchase price to one of four charities they picked. They got to say the corporation gives a lot to charity, and the customer gets to drive off the lot patting themselves on the back for being such a great human with a fresh bumper sticker on their recently depreciated Fujiwagon.
 

BigZ

Well-Known Member
Any time your employer requires you to volunteer, you are paid, and the company organizes the entire event, the company is just donating their resources to some cause. You are just being used for PR instead of your normal labor.
It's like buying a Subaru and having them donate $150 of the purchase price to one of four charities they picked. They got to say the corporation gives a lot to charity, and the customer gets to drive off the lot patting themselves on the back for being such a great human with a fresh bumper sticker on their recently depreciated Fujiwagon.
Would you like me to write them an angry letter about it?
To reiterate - that's how it is at a certain airline's corporate office. HR happens to be working out of that office too.
 

bimmerphile

SuperCritical™ Member
Would you like me to write them an angry letter about it?
To reiterate - that's how it is at a certain airline's corporate office. HR happens to be working out of that office too.
No...
It seems like it's become commonplace throughout corporate America. It's a practice I find questionable, but can't deny that some good actually comes of it.
 

Autothrust Blue

"...I know bait when I see it..."
Any time your employer requires you to volunteer, you are paid, and the company organizes the entire event, the company is just donating their resources to some cause. You are just being used for PR instead of your normal labor.
It's like buying a Subaru and having them donate $150 of the purchase price to one of four charities they picked. They got to say the corporation gives a lot to charity, and the customer gets to drive off the lot patting themselves on the back for being such a great human with a fresh bumper sticker on their recently depreciated Fujiwagon.
But you’re still doing better than buying a Tesla so...

Her response: "So you've done nothing..."
Which one of the Big 3 was this?
 

Autothrust Blue

"...I know bait when I see it..."
“HOW WILL WE TELL THAT YOU CAN GET ALONG ON THE FLIGHT DECK IF YOU DONT HAVE A CVS RECEIPT WORTH OF VOLUNTEER WORK!?!??”
Short list of ways to piss me off up front:
  • not being able to fly the airplane
  • being an unpleasant human being
  • not being able to fly the airplane
  • body odor or loud chewing
  • not being able to fly the airplane
 

Roger Roger

Paid to sleep, fly for fun
Short list of ways to piss me off up front:
  • not being able to fly the airplane
  • being an unpleasant human being
  • not being able to fly the airplane
  • body odor or loud chewing
  • not being able to fly the airplane
It’s funny, in an effort to protect employees former employers are so limited in what they can say that prospective employers are prying into people’s personal lives to differentiate them. Which is IMHO far worse than the alternative.
 
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Autothrust Blue

"...I know bait when I see it..."
If only you could be that honest.
If it makes you feel any better, I more or less told my Spirit interview panel that I was interested in making more money and having more time off, to finish my master's degree, own a house, play video games and ride my bikes. There were appreciative and understanding nods and even a smirk from the chief pilot on the panel.

And it seems to have worked, too.
 

nibake

Powder hound
If it makes you feel any better, I more or less told my Spirit interview panel that I was interested in making more money and having more time off, to finish my master's degree, own a house, play video games and ride my bikes. There were appreciative and understanding nods and even a smirk from the chief pilot on the panel.

And it seems to have worked, too.
This may not work as well if I'm interviewing somewhere I will have fewer days off and make less money. :rolleyes:
 
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