missed oral exam questions

SJFLYER

Well-Known Member
I would like to start a thread for missed questions or good to know questions during oral exams for any rating.


During my instrument oral I missed:
How many types of airmets are there, and what are they?

3 types:

AIRMET Sierra (IFR):
Ceilings less than 1000 feet and/or visibility less than 3 miles affecting over 50% of the area at one time.
Extensive mountain obscuration

AIRMET Tango (Turbulence):
Moderate turbulence
Sustained surface winds of 30 knots or more at the surface

AIRMET Zulu (Icing):
Moderate icing
Freezing levels
 

Razor

New Member
Back when I took my private checkride I remember having trouble sufficiently explaining maneuvering speed. I knew the stock definition, but had no idea it even changed with gross weight as that hadn't really been emphasized during my ground training.

Carolyn
 

flyitup

Well-Known Member
Good topic Orlando.

I recall missing the question "what power setting should you use on a forward slip to a landing"? The answer according to the DE is power to idle. While I agree with this in most situations, it is not necessarily "always" correct. For example, during a crosswind landing you would have the aircraft in the same configuration, and if you were low you most certainly would not have you power at idle.

Also make sure your familiar with the aircraft log books, and when the various inspections are due. What I did for this was to print out a sheet that I prepared on Word listing the inspection on the left and the due date on the right. This really impressed the examiner...

And on a final note when you prepare your 8710 form, download the PDF formatted page (Doug has provided a link on the JC homepage) and fill it in on your computer. The final product is a very neat and organized form which equals brownie points for the applicant. My examiner also said she was excited that I would be using a 172 for my checkride instead of a 152. I said, "Oh, great, if that's the case I'll bring a 747 for my instrument rating"!
 

reaperman

Well-Known Member
I didn't really miss any, but here are a couple of good ones on inspections.

Flight school/ rental aircraft:
Is a 100 hour inspection required for the check ride? No.
If the Mode C transponder has had it's altitude reporting function tested, is a Pitot/Static system test required? No.
 

davetheflyer

New Member
</font><blockquote><font class="small">In reply to:</font><hr />
For example, during a crosswind landing you would have the aircraft in the same configuration, and if you were low you most certainly would not have you power at idle.



[/ QUOTE ]

That example indicates a sideslip, while the question referred to a forward slip.

A forward slip is used to lose altitude for landing without gaining airspeed. Therefore, if you have the throttle at other than idle power, the airplane is resisting your efforts to lose altitude and you needlessly complicate your life. Basically, the object of a forward slip is to get down, and power would conflict with that goal.
 

flyitup

Well-Known Member
Dave, put like that it does make a little more since... If I remember correctly my instructor and I only did the forward slip to a landing once during my training. He is a big fan of just using full flaps and pulling the airspeed back to 60kts. (172)

I haven't dabbled too much with the forward slips, but it does seem like they produce a greater decent rate then I can get out of the flaps...

Which way did you teach as an instructor?
 

davetheflyer

New Member
Both. In Cherokees, you can perform a slip with the flaps extended. Cessnas are placarded against performing slips with flaps extended.

The slip is a good maneuver to know in a Cessna in case you ever lose electrical power (since most have electric flaps).

Additionally, in gusty conditions, sometimes I like to slip rather than use flaps because the higher approach speed and lower drag will enhance your stability and control.
 

Buzo

Well-Known Member
Cessna's are not placarded against doing slips with flaps. It says to avoid them. The POH says to avoid steep slips with greater than 20 degrees. There is nothing wrong with doing slips with full flaps.
 

ScorpionStinger

Well-Known Member
no place card on the 152 .... Maybe in the 172 but i haven't seen a place card that said avoid slips on a 152... i don't even talk about slips in the 152 POH ..
 

aloft

New Member
"Place card"? You setting the dinner table?


Placards are the little signs required to be in and on the airplane for things like maximum demonstrated crosswind component, maneuvering speed, oil capacity, etc. A list of them can be found in your airplane's POH.
 

jholloway_1

New Member
The only time I've done slips is with full flaps in a 152. My instructor has never said anything about using flaps and slips at the same time. You sure do lose some altitude!
 

davetheflyer

New Member
</font><blockquote><font class="small">In reply to:</font><hr />
Cessna's are not placarded against doing slips with flaps. It says to avoid them.

[/ QUOTE ]

I don't think that all Cessnas have the placard, but I have flown some that do.

In general, it's a good thing to keep in mind. From what I've been told, the extended flaps supposedly can block the flow of air over the rudder in a slip and make it hard to recover.

I'd go by the POH for your specific airplane.
 

Buzo

Well-Known Member
Dave,

What cessna's are you referring to that had the placard. I beleive you are talking about 172's. The full flap slip does give a buffet that scares people. That is why the say to avoid them, not prohibited.
 

davetheflyer

New Member
It's been so long since I've flown a Cessna that I can't remember what model, but I am reasonably certain that I've seen the placard in both 172s and 150s. I never heard the official reason behind it, the rudder thing was passed along by one of my CFIs.
 

Acadia

Well-Known Member
For those interested there is a pretty good article on forward slips in the current (January 2003) issue of Flight Training. As mentioned earlier forward slips to landing are a PTS item so everyone should have some experience and knowledge of them pertaining to the aircraft you are flying.
 

marcusprice

New Member
Heres one.

On my instrument orla the DPE asked what is the minumum visibility that you are allowed to take off in under part 91?

I answered there's no minumum visibility requirement for takeoff under part 91 but he replied by asking me, what's the visibility on the back of that plate? When I answered 1/2 mile he said "and that doesn't apply to you?". If it's on the plate it's mandatory even if you're operating uder part 91.

Another one was what are you going to do if you start to encounter ice buildup in a 172 or another small plane. I answered climb or descend to warmer air but he wanted just land ASAP.
 

bluelake

Well-Known Member
on my IRA oral, I was asked what I would do if I was cleared (only) to a fix and lots comm. I thought I knew where he was going with this and had some answers re: ETE, holds, etc... the fact is he explained that really that type of situation is a trap to accept a clearence short of an airport... would like to learn more about that. Another CFII said that folks get clearances short of the destination airports all of the time and its common, so I dont know.... ????
 

flyitup

Well-Known Member
</font><blockquote><font class="small">In reply to:</font><hr />
For those interested there is a pretty good article on forward slips in the current (January 2003) issue of Flight Training.

[/ QUOTE ]

Good deal... I'll be sure to check it out!
 
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