Mesa-Gateway Incident

z987k

Well-Known Member
#63
The MT prop does not require it, you’re right.
A friend just had a nasty prop strike at takeoff power due to gear failure. MT prop. The engine was in compliance with the Lyc AD(runout and cam gear dowl), but he elected to do a overhaul anyways. They basically just pulled it apart and put it back together, everything was in spec.
That's the 3rd piston engine MT prop strike I've seen where it should really just be put a new prop on and go. And the AD compliance seems more than adequate. I'm sold.
 
#65
Or a leasing agent. But yeah, between the prop and the registration, I don't think that was a Methods bird. Glad. They're a good lot, by and large.
Judging by the destinations it's recently flown to and how infrequently it flies, I'd be shocked if it was medevac.

According to AZCentral.com,

“The larger of the two planes, a Pilatus PC-12/45, a single-engine turboprop passenger and cargo aircraft, is registered to Daylight Nightlight EZ Flight LLC, a Scottsdale-based company.”

Always amusing reading the names of LLC shell companies.
The fun thing about shell companies is that most companies fail to use a different address than their main company address when they set them up, so all you have to do is reverse address search the registered to address and it'll show you who the real owner is. In this case, it appears to be a high end custom home builder.
 
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milleR

Well-Known Member
#66
The fun thing about shell companies is that most companies fail to use a different address than their main company address when they set them up, so all you have to do is reverse address search the registered to address and it'll show you who the real owner is. In this case, it appears to be a high end custom home builder.
It's almost like they've never heard of a registered agent
 

CFI A&P

Exploring the world one toilet at a time.
#67
Someday when I have the expendable capital to get my own airplane, it's going to be registered to "THIS IS MY SHELL CORP LLC"
Someone out there is running a citation under “These pretzels are making me thirsty, LLC”

This is JC field reporter CFI live from the scene, and it doesn’t look good.





Sent from my Startac using Tapatalk.
 
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#69
Late to the thread, but for those wondering how it unfolded, I had a friend on the ground who saw it.

As he told me, Pilatus was told to give way to the Skyhawk. Two were on the ground, PC12 saw the first, was supposed to go behind the second. Crunch.

ATP hasn’t sent us any urgent after action reports yet, and they usually will after ATP-caused incidents. Between that and having controlled a few fast taxiing Air Method PC12s in my ATC days... sounds believable.
 

NovemberEcho

Dergs favorite member
#70
Late to the thread, but for those wondering how it unfolded, I had a friend on the ground who saw it.

As he told me, Pilatus was told to give way to the Skyhawk. Two were on the ground, PC12 saw the first, was supposed to go behind the second. Crunch.

ATP hasn’t sent us any urgent after action reports yet, and they usually will after ATP-caused incidents. Between that and having controlled a few fast taxiing Air Method PC12s in my ATC days... sounds believable.
I almost had this situation in the air with an RJ and T6. Gave him traffic to follow at his 1 o clock, he reported in sight so I told to follow, cleared and shipped. Apparently he saw the T6 at his 4 o clock and went to follow that one and cut right in front of the T6 that had been at his 1 o clock. Any time I have like types on final now I’ll give Traffic on both and make sure they got the right one.
 

BobDDuck

Island Bus Driver
#71
I almost had this situation in the air with an RJ and T6. Gave him traffic to follow at his 1 o clock, he reported in sight so I told to follow, cleared and shipped. Apparently he saw the T6 at his 4 o clock and went to follow that one and cut right in front of the T6 that had been at his 1 o clock. Any time I have like types on final now I’ll give Traffic on both and make sure they got the right one.
We have guidance now that during a TCAS RA we should avoid looking outside for the traffic as we may see the wrong target and ignore the resolution presented on the PFD. Not really sure how I feel about that.
 

NovemberEcho

Dergs favorite member
#72
We have guidance now that during a TCAS RA we should avoid looking outside for the traffic as we may see the wrong target and ignore the resolution presented on the PFD. Not really sure how I feel about that.
My experience is anecdotal but TCAS causes more near collisions than saves people from them. Once they bumped the buffer to 600’ instead of 500’ RA’s happen on legslly seperated level aircraft and it just LOVES to have you climb into the guy 1000’ above you
 
#73
I almost had this situation in the air with an RJ and T6. Gave him traffic to follow at his 1 o clock, he reported in sight so I told to follow, cleared and shipped. Apparently he saw the T6 at his 4 o clock and went to follow that one and cut right in front of the T6 that had been at his 1 o clock. Any time I have like types on final now I’ll give Traffic on both and make sure they got the right one.
Geez. Saw this exact same situation unfold today in a Class D, albeit with slower types.

My hair always raised calling traffic when there were similar types nearby each other. I probably learned my lesson the same way you did.
 
#74
My experience is anecdotal but TCAS causes more near collisions than saves people from them. Once they bumped the buffer to 600’ instead of 500’ RA’s happen on legslly seperated level aircraft and it just LOVES to have you climb into the guy 1000’ above you
The 7.1 and on software deals with multiple threats better, however, in general pilot training is lacking, and the response to a climb or descend RA is max rate, not the green band. Not flying in the green band is likely to cause what you’re seeing, as the TCAS systems continuously monitor traffic and will adjust to prevent this if possible. Alternatively, if impossible the RA may spread to multiple aircraft. Fun stuff. Guy in the bottom of a holding stack gets an RA, and the 6 planes on top all end up climbing too!


Always fly the RA, it’s frequently not the plane that you see who is the threat.
 
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