Mesa-Gateway Incident

CFI A&P

Exploring the world one toilet at a time.
#22
Wow, those composite props just disintegrate.
They are durable in the thrust plane, but very frail when they make contact with an object. In a previous life I worked at a propeller shop and one came in with tip damage, the story was the pilot's collar caught the tip of the blade when pulling the nose wheel chocks out. It took a couple inches off of the blade and required a new blade.
 

knot4u

Repeat Offender
#23
If I had enough money to fly around in my own PC-12 and that happened it would get a new or overhauled/exchange gearbox and prop. I'm sure there are a set of inspections that would need to be carried out after a prop strike detailed in the AMM as well. If I was a dirty 135 operator I'd find an as removed prop with an 8130-3, swap it out, cross my fingers and toes, and keep on trucking.
 

gotWXdagain

Highly Visible Member
#24
If I had enough money to fly around in my own PC-12 and that happened it would get a new or overhauled/exchange gearbox and prop. I'm sure there are a set of inspections that would need to be carried out after a prop strike detailed in the AMM as well. If I was a dirty 135 operator I'd find an as removed prop with an 8130-3, swap it out, cross my fingers and toes, and keep on trucking.
Honestly when those MT’s disintegrate off a PC-12, the engine won’t feel it.
 

knot4u

Repeat Offender
#25
Honestly when those MT’s disintegrate off a PC-12, the engine won’t feel it.
I won't argue because I have zero experience with any of this stuff. I'm just saying if I was flying it around IFR at night, above some weather, with loved ones in the back and I could afford to own the thing in the first place that's how I'd do it. I'm sure it'd be overkill, but the warm fuzzies knowing that I'd gone above and beyond would outweigh the buyers remorse. But maybe that attitude is just me getting old.
 
Last edited:

ppragman

Direct Yeska
#28
I won't argue because I have zero experience with any of this stuff. I'm just saying if I was flying it around IFR at night, above some weather, with loved ones in the back and I could afford to own the thing in the first place that's how I'd do it. I'm sure it'd be overkill, but the warm fuzzies knowing that I'd gone above and beyond would outweigh the buyers remorse. But maybe that attitude is just me getting old.
At my old shop we had a prop strike with an MT prop - a guy got stuck in the mud and tried to add full power to get out of the mud and got the prop.

That engine (and probably more importantly the reduction gear box) made it to TBO without any issues. I wouldn’t worry about it one bit.
 

knot4u

Repeat Offender
#30
At my old shop we had a prop strike with an MT prop - a guy got stuck in the mud and tried to add full power to get out of the mud and got the prop.

That engine (and probably more importantly the reduction gear box) made it to TBO without any issues. I wouldn’t worry about it one bit.
Fair enough.
 

ppragman

Direct Yeska
#32
It was actually pretty amazing the prop sheared off like a hot knife cut through butter right where it went into the mud. It was kind of incredible- if I can find it I’ll dig up a pic.

More problematic was rock fod damage about two years later due to massive fistfuls of reverse on gravel.
 

Roger Roger

Paid to sleep, fly for fun
#34
At my old shop we had a prop strike with an MT prop - a guy got stuck in the mud and tried to add full power to get out of the mud and got the prop.

That engine (and probably more importantly the reduction gear box) made it to TBO without any issues. I wouldn’t worry about it one bit.
Considering some of the stupid crap that I’ve seen require an engine tear down regardless of what common sense says, I’m shocked that they don’t make you do it anyway.
 

ppragman

Direct Yeska
#36
Considering some of the stupid crap that I’ve seen require an engine tear down regardless of what common sense says, I’m shocked that they don’t make you do it anyway.
If memory serves, literally all that had to be done was a bore scope inspection and oil analysis for a few dozen hours.

Meanwhile dropping a Navajo off the jacks and dinging a prop on the way down requires a teardown by Lycoming...
 
Top