LUV ramp agent position?

Matt

New Member
Has anyone gone thru the process of getting a ramp position? I think I read that 737dude used to work at LUV?

What sort of things should I expect at the Group Info. Session? I'm guessing it's sort of a meet-and-greet and if they like you, they'll invite you for an interview? This seems like the perfect job to have while gone thru training.

Thanks!
 

BlueStreak

New Member
Matt,

I worked for the last year and a half as a customer service and ramp agent at KAZO. I worked for an express carrier at a non-hub so my hiring situation was a different than what you may go through. I was interviewed by the station manager and was hired the next day. I am not sure how the "mass" interviews or information sessions are conducted. My interview was pretty basic, just focused on a lot of customer service issues and any type of aviation related experience I had.
I was recently furloughed from that job since the station was closed because of low passenger volume. Overall, I enjoyed my time working for the airlines. Here are some of my pros and cons of the ramp job:

Pros:
Working hands on with the aircraft
A great view of the airport from the ramp
You see all aspects of airport operatoins
Driving the equipment
Marshalling the aircraft
Dynamic work envrionment
Good physical workout when loading baggage
Interaction with the flight crews
Flight benefits with your airline - the best perk!



Cons:
Having to work the early hours (5am or earlier)
Having to work the late hours (11pm or later)
Having to work the late hours, then the early hours the next day = very little sleep
Having to work holidays
The low pay
Cancelled flights = unloading all the luggage you just loaded
Constant loud noises are a pain when you are tired or have a headache
Dealing with the weather - downpouring rain, snow, and nasty winds can take all the fun out of working on the ramp.
Equipment breaking down
Bags coming open on the ramp, luggage falling off cart
Dealing with air cargo shipments - one time in particular I remember unloading cricket larvae (small worms) in boxes that were damaged so the worms were all over everything.
Stress of multiple flights arriving within a short time due to delays, etc.

Overall it was a great job. My experiences were a little different since I worked at an outstation (non-hub) and we had to perform both the customer service and ramp duties. We checked in passengers and also loaded the aircraft, added to the stress but was still fun. The only part that really got to me was the early mornings...I was taking classes in college and working on my flight training too. When I had to be up by 4 am to go to work, the rest of the day wasn't always that productive and I sure didn't feel like doing classes or going flying. You do get used to it though and can survive on very little sleep after your body adjusts.
Let me know if you have any more questions. I know there are quite a few people on these forums that worked as ramp agents too. They were most likely working for the mainline carriers so their experiences might be more similar to what you can expect. Good luck!

Happy Flying!
 

A320_DUDE

Well-Known Member
[ QUOTE ]
Has anyone gone thru the process of getting a ramp position? I think I read that 737dude used to work at LUV?

What sort of things should I expect at the Group Info. Session? I'm guessing it's sort of a meet-and-greet and if they like you, they'll invite you for an interview? This seems like the perfect job to have while gone thru training.


[/ QUOTE ]

The interview process is very straightforward with no hidden agendas. The group interview is just a informational session,telling you what you can expect about the job and the company. Usually the HR person will keep the people they want to interview individually after the group session. The questions are usually "WWYD" type questions. They want to see the real person....if they smell a fake(and they can!) you are gone. They try to get back to you within two weeks (or earlier if the background check is done quickly).

Training is 2 weeks in DAL and is paid. They also give you a per diem check for expenses when you arrive($75 if you stay at the Raddison,$150 if you get stuck at the Shearaton.DO NOT let them put your class in the Harvey,lets just say the other "guests" in your room won't be human). Training will either be 7a-3p or 4p-12m,the instructors will do everything short of handing you the answers to help you pass. Training is done right at Love Field....they use to let the trainees work a couple flights before they went back to their stations.(Note:You will need ear protection around the -200s or you will go stone deaf!)

Startng pay is a little over 10 bucks an hour,flight and medical benifits start on day 1.If you tell me what station you are applying to I can tell you what the schedules and general quality of life is at that particular city is like. All in all it's a pretty good job,with a pretty diverse work group. If you are a team player,you'll make it on the ramp.

To change the subject a little: BlueStreak, I'm gonna take a wild guess and say you work for PSA/USAirways Exp?
 

Matt

New Member
Thanks for the great reply Blue Streak.

Did you like being a CSA or ramper best? For the location I'm looking at, both LUV and AirTran show openings at BWI ....with the AirTran job covering both jobs. Dealing with luggage seems like it would be a easier than angry and delayed passengers.
 

A320_DUDE

Well-Known Member
DO NOT go to Customer Service unless you have the ability not hit a passenger. I have found my ability to deal with the traveling public degenerated to the point to where I had no choice but to bid the ramp for the time being. Customer Service takes a real toll on your mental well being...you will become anti-social overnight. Truthfully it's not worth the money anymore to be a CSA.....if you have a choice go into Ramp or Operations.
 

Matt

New Member
737dude,

I'm looking for a position at BWI. I've heard they plan to grow there even more than they already have.
When you got your job did you just show up for the Group Session or send in the application, then get invited?
Did rampers have much time to talk with the pilots or are both busy doing their own jobs making the 20 minute turns?
 

A320_DUDE

Well-Known Member
[ QUOTE ]
I'm looking for a position at BWI. I've heard they plan to grow there even more than they already have.

[/ QUOTE ]

This would be a good time to apply for "BeeWee". If they go ahead with the current growth plan,you will have a ton of people under you on the list

[ QUOTE ]
When you got your job did you just show up for the Group Session or send in the application, then get invited?

[/ QUOTE ]

I sent them my resume,then was invited....but they take walk-ins too!

[ QUOTE ]
Did rampers have much time to talk with the pilots or are both busy doing their own jobs making the 20 minute turns?

[/ QUOTE ]

Depends....I was in Operations, so my job WAS talking to the pilots. But the pilots are really friendly folks and will stop and talk to you regardless of who you are.
 

BlueStreak

New Member
Hey guys,

Yes I did work for US Airways Express (PSA Airlines). As for working customer service, most of my jobs in the 7 years that I have been working have dealt with customer interaction. I would, by far, say that the airline customer service agent was the most demanding and punishing position. It is unbelievable how people can act when their flights don't go directly as planned. I have never seen so many people lose their temper, yell obsenities, and get downright childish. Now, I would consider myself lucky because we flew the Dornier 328's and could hold only 32 people which meant we had less to deal with when flights cancelled. This doesn't mean it was easy but it was definately nicer than having to rebook everyone from an RJ or 737 and higher. The main problem is that the general public doesn't understand the airline industry, flying in general, and all the complex airfare rules that the airlines have. All they know is that they want to be to their destination and they want to be there now! There were those days when it took every ounce of will power to keep from losing my own temper. Things got a lot better once they started having full time law enforcement at the airport - you could always call them when you needed it. Just like any customer service job you get used to the type of customers you deal with and learn what to expect and how to try to prevent certain situations. Most of the passengers were well behaved and it was nice to meet people that worked in all fields and had all kinds of experiences. I also met some famous people while working at the airport which was always a nice added benefit. The flight benefits made up for all the abuse we took at the ticket counter - I was able to visit places like Seattle, Boston, DC, New York, Charlotte, Pittsburgh, Dayton, Philadelphia, Tampa, Ft. Lauderdale, Key West, Bermuda, and London UK. Not too bad for only having the job for a year and a half, plus it was all free! Being able to see the Pentagon and Ground Zero just three months after the attacks was well worth the hard times at work. The life experiences you gain from traveling and the work experiences you gain from the job are well worth it to anyone interested in an aviation career. I loved the interaction with the flight crews and being on the operations side of the flights. It really was a lot of fun with a lot of hard times but well worth it. I would recommend applying for whatever position best fits your personality and job desires. I enjoyed ramp and customer service duties, but would probably go more for ramp duties. Of course the funny thing at our station was that when it was cold out, everyone wanted to work the counter, and when it was warm and sunny out, everyone wanted to work outside
It's just one of those things that varies with your mood. Once again, good luck with your job pursuits and keep us updated!
 

JediNein

New Member
Far better to be a F/A than a ramp rat. SWA is hiring for those positions to be based at LAX and BUR.

The pay is better.
The schedule is better.
The physical stresses are less.
You're already living the life of an airline pilot.
The treatment is better by both the front line managers AND the people you deal with.
You get a h*ck of a lot more time to get great references for the front seat job.
AND, you get the prized company seniority number.
At the end of the day with an early call the next morning, someone ELSE empties and cleans the lavs.

Work your contract. Fly the mins, and bid reserve. Or, fly the max and let crew scheduling know you want to be first on the jr. man list. Try to get to the first class sections as soon as possible. Even at the ticket counter, the frequent flyers and top dollar folks treat you better.

Fly SAFE!
Jedi Nein
 

Matt

New Member
Thanks for all the posts ....I'm gonna take the advice and shy away from working the CSA job (AirTran).
Now I need to put together all the listings they require for work history, addresses, etc. Hopefully, I can dig up the list I had to do recently for the ANG.

737dude - what's involved in the training to take 2 weeks? Do they want you to get an inside look at the company and bring you to DAL to do that? Might even run into Herb!
 
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