Lufthansa sues passenger for skipping last leg of flight, wants more than $2G

Oxman

Well-Known Member
Is this common?



German airline Lufthansa is suing an unnamed passenger for skipping the last leg of his flight in an attempt to crack down on the so-called hidden city style of travel.
“Hidden city” ticketing is when someone books a flight with a layover that is really his or her ultimate destination. Basically, you embed your actual destination within the flight route, get off there, and skip the final leg listed on your ticket.

In this case, “an unnamed male passenger booked a return flight from Oslo to Seattle, which had a layover in Frankfurt,” CNN reported. “The passenger used all legs of the outbound flight, but did not catch the Frankfurt to Oslo return flight. He instead flew on a separate Lufthansa reservation from Frankfurt to Berlin.”
Airlines lay out specific terms and conditions prohibiting this type of booking and travel, claiming that it costs them money.

“When we fly, we agree to airlines’ Conditions of Carriage, or similarly named small print,” saysLonely Planet. “These prohibit buying connecting tickets with the intention to only use half of them.”
The idea behind it is that a non-direct flight is cheaper for the passenger than a direct flight, so a passenger is liable for the lost revenue, Lonely Planet said. The airline is “legally entitled to
come after you” for the price difference between the one-stop flight and the direct flight.
In the current case Lufthansa is seeking €2,112, or about $2,385, CNN said. The airline is appealing the December dismissal of its initial case in a Berlin district court.
It’s not the first such lawsuit, CNN noted. In 2015 United and Orbitz sued the founder of Skiplagged.com, a popular website devoted to revealing “hidden city” flight deals as the preferred way of booking. The suit was thrown out on a technicality.
 
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z987k

Well-Known Member
So you can't decide that you'd rather go to Berlin than Oslo once you get to Frankfurt? It's not like he didn't pay for another ticket.
So, nah, sorry, you cannot compel someone to get on your airline because they bough a ticket.

My company would be in a crap ton of trouble if that was the case.
 

gotWXdagain

Highly Visible Member
So, if a passenger no-shows a seat they’ve already paid for, leaving you with an empty seat to fill with an additional potential non-rev or standby, or revenue passenger if the flight is over sold, how exactly does that passenger’s no show cost you money?
 

Derg

Cap, Roci
Staff member
“Hidden City” reservations will get you banned in the states too.

But I think LH is making a point.

It’s common and I watched someone need to have his bag checked from PHX to ORD but they said they were getting off the jet in DTW (connection) and policy was that they had to send the bags to the ultimate destination.

Zero sympathy.
 

NovemberEcho

Dergs favorite member
So, airline can sell a product that does not exist no problem. But if passenger pays for ticket and then doesn’t fly is problem. I’m confused.


I did the hidden city thing once.

TLH-MIA $400
TLH-MIA-EWR $315

I was driving home anyway with a friend so booked the flight to EWR and got off in MIA. Guess I’m lucky Delta was none the wiser.
 
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Oxman

Well-Known Member
“Hidden City” reservations will get you banned in the states too.

But I think LH is making a point.

It’s common and I watched someone need to have his bag checked from PHX to ORD but they said they were getting off the jet in DTW (connection) and policy was that they had to send the bags to the ultimate destination.

Zero sympathy.
This is why I travel with only a backpack as much as I can.
May I recommend a Fox Field Operator Action Pack. It carries a week of clothing and a laptop. On Amazon.
 
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Nihon_Ni

Well-Known Member
I ordered breakfast this morning: eggs, bacon, grits and toast; except I didn't want toast. Even so, the waitress let me order it and didn't ban me from coming back next week because I didn't eat my toast. I could have ordered the three items I actually wanted a la carte, but it was cheaper to buy the set menu and discard the toast. Frankly, I'm not sure how the airlines get away with this but there's a lot of legal precedent I don't understand.
 

Derg

Cap, Roci
Staff member
Easy fix: revamp the airline seat ticket pricing. DONE...!
Even that would be difficult as well.

Let’s say AA and UA fly non-stop PHX to ORD. But DL wants some of that action so they price a PHX-DTW-ORD at a competitive price to the nonstops on UA and AA. But then, PHX to DTW nonstops on AA and DL command a higher fare because of a number of reasons.

Marketing and yield management is a hyper complex operation and you’ve got to think “Are you in business to fly people from A to B or to make money?”
 
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