Lost Logbook

Flybub

Well-Known Member
#1
Hey everyone. My wife and I recently moved and my logbook is nowhere to be found. I kept it in a safety deposit box at our bank, along with a few other of our items, we however cannot find what we took out of it. We moved to a different county and these items are nowhere to be found after a few weeks (shame on us).

So here's where I'm at. Got my private in Ohio part 61 when I was 18. Flew here and there before going to FlightSafety in Vero Beach. I finished up at FSA with my Commercial MEL/SEL and Instrument Rating. My last flight, which also happened to be the final stage of the program, was my SEL Commercial Add-On. That was my last flight and that was 17 years ago. I moved back to Ohio because of some family obligations. I have my 8710 I submitted for that flight, I also have a receipt list of all my flight tags from FSA. I got in touch with one of my previous instructors at FSA and he took pictures of all our flights together so I have that as well. I will be missing approximately 30 hours from the time I got my Private (flying family and friends) to enrolling at FSA.

My question in recreating my logbook - Do I just write in my time from my 8710 Add-On, or do I go line by line everything I have from my flight tag receipts and instructor pictures? I will not have all my destinations for my solo x-countries or all the approaches I shot. My flight tag receipts tell me which flights were solo and dual along with the hobbs time and tail number, but no destinations.

We are in a good position financially so I am getting back in the saddle and going for my CFI and eventually a regional/corporate gig.

How should I handle my logbook situation to be as clear as possible for future interviews? If some of you in the industry could give me some guidance I would appreciate it. Thanks in advance.

FWIW I created a spreadsheet for the future so this doesn't happen again.
 
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Pilot Fighter

Well-Known Member
#2
How should you handle this in interviews?

You met the minimum qualifications for the certs and ratings that you have and then stopped flying. I'd start a new logbook and simply explain that that this logbook represents everything after your 17 year break.

I'd then recreate another logbook containing content of lost logbook.

How many hours did you have beyond mins for the certs and ratings you hold?

I'd keep the old and new separate to keep things simple for interviews.
 
#3
Just start a new logbook, and carry forward the hours you have to the best of your knowledge. It isn't a big deal at all. The details don't matter, as it will be a single line entry in the new logbook.

Assuming it is within 10 or 20% of what was on your last 8710, I highly doubt it will raise any red flags with anyone. Just be prepared to substantiate what you put in the new one.
 

denverpilot

Well-Known Member
#7
And nowadays the cheapest and easiest Logbook insurance, is just to take a digital picture of each page as it’s completed. Make sure everything is legible in the photo and store said photos wherever you like and trust, both at home and in someone else’s server (cough: “the cloud”).
 

Rotor2Wing

Unapologetically American
#8
I lost my original logbook in 2013. I used my last 8710 times to recreate my new one. The only thing I did have on my side is I had recently carried over my totals by aircraft to logbook pro so I had that too. I ordered my airman file with that specific 8710 from the FAA. I keep it and a notarized statement in my logbook now. So far no one acts like they care but I have my first 121 interview this week so we will see how it goes. They have said they didn't care since it matches my last 8710. That last 8710 was also done at the FSDO and it included a lovely logbook review by a seasoned inspector!!
 

Flybub

Well-Known Member
#9
I lost my original logbook in 2013. I used my last 8710 times to recreate my new one. The only thing I did have on my side is I had recently carried over my totals by aircraft to logbook pro so I had that too. I ordered my airman file with that specific 8710 from the FAA. I keep it and a notarized statement in my logbook now. So far no one acts like they care but I have my first 121 interview this week so we will see how it goes. They have said they didn't care since it matches my last 8710. That last 8710 was also done at the FSDO and it included a lovely logbook review by a seasoned inspector!!
Thank you. I'm debating trying to recreate from the pictures my instructor sent me or just go off my 8710 since my last flight was my Commercial SE add-on. Thanks again and good luck in your interview!
 

moxiepilot

Well-Known Member
#10
Just go off your 8710, recreating everything is tedious and time consuming, and then you'll come across something you forgot anyway.

In the big picture those hours only matter to get you to the interview. If you can substantiate you will be fine
 

Flybub

Well-Known Member
#11
Just go off your 8710, recreating everything is tedious and time consuming, and then you'll come across something you forgot anyway.

In the big picture those hours only matter to get you to the interview. If you can substantiate you will be fine
Thank You!
 

Nihon_Ni

Well-Known Member
#12
I'd then recreate another logbook containing content of lost logbook. .
I think this is extraordinarily bad advice. Falsifying your pilot records could lead to revocation of your certificates, being fired from your job, and all manner of bad things. Loosing your logbook sucks, but don't make it worse. Your last 8710 is an official copy of your logs, just use it and go from there.
 

Hammertime

Well-Known Member
#13
I wouldn't got to the trouble to recreate another logbook. As has been stated above, just use the times from your last 8710.

... Falsifying your pilot records could lead to revocation of your certificates, being fired from your job, and all manner of bad things. Loosing your logbook sucks, but don't make it worse. Your last 8710 is an official copy of your logs, just use it and go from there.
However, If the OP did choose to recreate his old logbook, it is NOT falsifying pilot records. Cool your jets dude. He lost his logbook, and is honestly trying to recreate it to the best of his knowledge. At no point has someone suggested he make up times...

(Edited to fix bad quote insertion...)
 

Pilot Fighter

Well-Known Member
#14
I think this is extraordinarily bad advice. Falsifying your pilot records could lead to revocation of your certificates, being fired from your job, and all manner of bad things. Loosing your logbook sucks, but don't make it worse. Your last 8710 is an official copy of your logs, just use it and go from there.
Slow down, tiger.

I wasn't suggesting falsifying anything, just recreating with known data. Nothing wrong with that as long as you aren't guessing or forging anything. I didn't think I needed to say that.

My advice mirrored everybody else's, start a new logbook where you left off.

I went a step further suggesting there might be some utility in recreating the lost logbook from known data and openly labeling it as a recreation. I suggested keeping the recreation separate from the new one for reasons I thought to be obvious.

In this case, there probably isn't a big need to recreate the old log as it probably documents the prerequisites for obtained certs and ratings without any excess hours that might be applied towards another cert or rating.
 
#15
Just use the numbers from the last 8710 to transfer them in to the new Logbook and go Electronic and keep backups. The 8710 is an official FAA record so I don't see any problems just using the totals from that.
Your licenses prove the ratings you already have. It shouldn't be an issue. A lot of guys lose logbooks.

Good Luck
 

Nihon_Ni

Well-Known Member
#16
Slow down, tiger.

I wasn't suggesting falsifying anything, just recreating with known data. Nothing wrong with that as long as you aren't guessing or forging anything. I didn't think I needed to say that.

My advice mirrored everybody else's, start a new logbook where you left off.

I went a step further suggesting there might be some utility in recreating the lost logbook from known data and openly labeling it as a recreation. I suggested keeping the recreation separate from the new one for reasons I thought to be obvious.

In this case, there probably isn't a big need to recreate the old log as it probably documents the prerequisites for obtained certs and ratings without any excess hours that might be applied towards another cert or rating.
I guess I have a different view on what falsification is. I still stand by my position that recreating your old logbook is falsifying a record if you don't already have a record of every flight from which to make a copy (i.e., recreating a paper copy based on an electronic record isn't falsification. Making up flight that are "about right" that add up to the a know total is falsification.)

I'd then recreate another logbook containing content of lost logbook.
Remaking a logbook that is "close enough" isn't good enough. Errors in it are in fact falsification. Besides, there's no need to go to that trouble. Just carry forward the totals from the last 8710 and start a new logbook going forward.

From one pilot fighter to another. ;)
 

Pilot Fighter

Well-Known Member
#17
I guess I have a different view on what falsification is. I still stand by my position that recreating your old logbook is falsifying a record if you don't already have a record of every flight from which to make a copy (i.e., recreating a paper copy based on an electronic record isn't falsification. Making up flight that are "about right" that add up to the a know total is falsification.)



Remaking a logbook that is "close enough" isn't good enough. Errors in it are in fact falsification. Besides, there's no need to go to that trouble. Just carry forward the totals from the last 8710 and start a new logbook going forward.

From one pilot fighter to another. ;)
I agree with much of what you have said.

I don't think you can guess or fill in the blanks. Each flight should be supported with evidence of some sort and you'd have to be content with missing hours and incomplete flight data.

I have seen such an effort done right. A young pilot obtained flying club records and copies of CFI logbook pages that documented dual. Some data was missing and the pilot didn't try to claim credit for what she couldn't prove. In some ways, it was more credible than her original logbook that had no supporting documents.
 

Flybub

Well-Known Member
#19
Thanks again all for the input. Didn't intend for this to be a debate, but I did learn something. :)

Thanks again for the help, it's great knowing there is a group of fellow pilots willing to answer questions.
 

Pilot Fighter

Well-Known Member
#20
Thanks again all for the input. Didn't intend for this to be a debate, but I did learn something. :)

Thanks again for the help, it's great knowing there is a group of fellow pilots willing to answer questions.
Debates are good, especially when you willing to consider opposing views and be prepared to modify your own.

In this case, I failed to detail the challenges and limitations faced when recreating a logbook.
 
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