looking for info

maybe I am in the wrong place, but it seems that most of you are professional pilots here. I have not began to take flying lessons yet, and was looking for information to help me out with some of my questions. First, I am hoping to become a professional pilot for a major airline some day. For any of you that are already there, what type of math does it take to get there? Do you have to be a math genius(ie. calculus, trig.)? Is it true that up to 40% of pilots will face mandatory retirement within the next 5-10 years? What steps in pursuing a career with a major airline help you to go from the regionals to the majors? For any of you with many years of experience, do you have any sound advice to help me achieve my career goals(ie. can you remember any one significant move or choice you made to help you get ther or enhance your experience once you were there), and is it worth it being a major airline pilot? I really believe it would have to be and I am prepared to do anything to get me there. So, please don't sugar coat any of your answers, just give it to me straight as a shot of Jack Daniels.

Thanks for your information.
 

DE727UPS

Well-Known Member
what type of math does it take to get there?

About all it takes is being able to do basic math in your head...nothing fancy.

Is it true that up to 40% of pilots will face mandatory retirement within the next 5-10 years?

Not at my airline. Maybe in 10-20 years. Where did you get that stat? Remember...Air Inc and the big flight academies distort the truth to draw more people into the industry.

What steps in pursuing a career with a major airline help you to go from the regionals to the majors?

I'd say PIC turbine time and networking...and a lot of luck.

do you have any sound advice to help me achieve my career goals?

Don't get any DUI's. Get a non-aviation degree. Be able to live anywhere on a moments notice. Try not to get married. Never turn down a chance to move up the ladder. And never, ever, be a scab.

is it worth it being a major airline pilot?

Heck yeah...it's worked out great for me.
 
Thanks for the info, but what is PIC turbine time? I can assure you that I will not get a DUI, I love to travel, and marriage probably will not happen either since I would probably have more luck jumping in a 747 right now and flying with no experience at all and managing to find Paris France and land with no incidents than I do with dating women.
Oh, why is it that you say not to get a degree in aviation? I know a scab comes into work for less money when there is a dispute on a contract, is that the same in the airline business?
 

stuckingfk

Well-Known Member
[ QUOTE ]
but what is PIC turbine time?

[/ QUOTE ]

PIC turbine time is what a captain would log in a turbine engine aircraft (including jets). The regionals in the US that still fly props would be twin turbine PIC time for the captain. Captains flying jets everywhere else would also be logging PIC turbine time.
 

Mr_Creepy

Well-Known Member
[ QUOTE ]
I know a scab comes into work for less money when there is a dispute on a contract, is that the same in the airline business?

[/ QUOTE ]

That is not completely accurate.

Dictionary by Merriam-Webster says:
scab : a contemptible person b (1) : a worker who refuses to join a labor union (2) : a union member who refuses to strike or returns to work before a strike has ended (3) : a worker who accepts employment or replaces a union worker during a strike (4) : one who works for less than union wages or on nonunion terms

While #2 is correct, #3 is the most accurate definition. I have never heard that word used for #4.

People throw that scab word around entirely too much. Until you've actually been a striking pilot and seen someone go take your job and ruin your bargaining position you have no concept of that word.

Calling someone a scab is definitely a hostile act and you better be sure you mean it!
 

Mr_Creepy

Well-Known Member
You were asking about PIC Turbine time. Here are some examples of cheaper alternatives:


"Turbine Time"


"Multi-Turbine Time" (and with the President!)


No joke - we actually kept a Turban in our charter office and threw it on anyone's head who complained about not getting enough "Turbine Time."
 

DE727UPS

Well-Known Member
why is it that you say not to get a degree in aviation?

It's nice to have training in an area outside of aviation for the times when your flying career isn't going so good. You could get furloughed or your airline could out of business.
 

Derg

Cap, Roci
Staff member
John, you just made me laugh controllably in the pilot lounge. I think the chief pilot is going to walk out of his office any time and have me committed!
 

Athena

New Member
I see you mentioned not getting an aviation degree. I am curious if you think foreign language degrees are of use as a pilot. I will be completing a Spanish and an Aviation degree. The way the program is set up I have enough time before i get the required number of flight hours to get another degree before i graduate. I am considering Japanese as my third language. Do you think the foreign languages would be beneficial? Will it help me in corporate aviation? I
 

QCInspectorCFII

New Member
Yes I also recommend having a non-aviation related degree or trade....Nothing is ever guarenteed in the Aviation Industry except one thing if your in it long enough.....Aviation is directed connected to the Economy and their will come a time when you will be laid off or furloughed and so if you have something to fall back on for the mean time its makes eating more tastier and paying bills easier...I work for a Major Airline as a QC inspector the last 4 years and as a result of Sept 2001 i was laid off for a short time but then was recalled...the key in Aviation is Preparation..it will happen.....its the 10 year cycle....im sure there are others here who will agree...Good Luck....
 
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