Looking for an online school for B.S. degree

phill1174

Well-Known Member
It’s a question that opens up another wormhole of hire-ability. Did you apply to be check airman? Why not? Did you get hired as a check airman? Why not?
I wondered if anyone asked this question after I applied for a check airman spot at my airline.
 

Max Power

Well-Known Member
Choose wisely!

There are (legit) online degree programs and also some "California University"'s that a lot of pilots get involved with as well.

Some are OK, others you kind of shake your head at.
There’s also a legit brick and mortar California University of Pennsylvania. It’s a state school with a decent selection of online classes. I’m doing a BA in Jurisprudence (basically a degree for paralegals)because I’ve always found the subjects listed in the course catalog interesting since I started considering a degree a decade ago.

I didn’t want to go into debt for education ( I paid off a ton of consumer debt earlier in life) and it took until CA upgrade at my regional to pay as I went. If you’re a PA resident, undergrad online comes out to about $375 per credit hour. They also gave me credit for all of my associates degree (also done in PA) most of it over 15 years ago.

I’m in my last semester right now. Two long years with lots of overnights spent doing schoolwork. Hopefully it pays off.
 
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Autothrust Blue

"I’d make a suggestion but you won’t listen”
Well, I mean, that is exactly what they're saying. They just don't want to come out and say it directly.

Who exactly do you think they're trying to "weed out"?
Mostly, people who can't finish a course of study, I'd guess.
 

Acrofox

All dragon~
Mostly, people who can't finish a course of study, I'd guess.
I find this non-responsive.

Mostly, degree requirements are intended, whether intentionally or not, to skim the upper stratum of class—that is, standard upper or upper-middle-class white guys from a traditional background.

They are literally applying discriminators that grease the rails for the "traditional" applicant, whilst giving the working class the "side-eye." It's been referenced countless times, whether directly or indirectly.

When people talk about "privilege," this is what they talk about. Yes, some disadvantaged people can elevate themselves; yes, some otherwise 'advantaged' people do work hard; and yes, sometimes people fail to start or fail to finish because they possess undesirable character attributes. They are exceptions to the rule that it's an awful lot easier to be the "ideal applicant" when daddy pays.
 

Nark

Sheepdog
I find this non-responsive.

Mostly, degree requirements are intended, whether intentionally or not, to skim the upper stratum of class—that is, standard upper or upper-middle-class white guys from a traditional background.

They are literally applying discriminators that grease the rails for the "traditional" applicant, whilst giving the working class the "side-eye." It's been referenced countless times, whether directly or indirectly.

When people talk about "privilege," this is what they talk about. Yes, some disadvantaged people can elevate themselves; yes, some otherwise 'advantaged' people do work hard; and yes, sometimes people fail to start or fail to finish because they possess undesirable character attributes. They are exceptions to the rule that it's an awful lot easier to be the "ideal applicant" when daddy pays.
So that’s your excuse? Not a rich white boy, therefore college is unattainable?
My wife isn’t a male, she somehow obtained a degree. Her sisters, the same. One recently earned a masters while raising 4 kids, and pregnant with her 5th. All three grew up in a single income household. Maybe if this was 1956, your “woe is me” argument would hold water. Not today.


There are plenty of jobs out there, which pay 6 figures, that don’t require a degree.
There are plenty of avenues to become an A350 Captain wearing a double breasted jacket. Just depends on how hard you need to work to get there.
 

Bob Ridpath

Pit Bull love
Old guy here, retired. Won’t work a day again over the years I have left.

BS in Pastoral Ministry and Master of Divinity (whatever that means) for a previous career long ago. The degrees were useful in employment (and required) for a time, but have been meaningless for years. Had foundational studies in business administration before transferring to another school for ministry. The degrees brought me extra income in later years as a 911 Dispatcher, not because of content per say, but just because I had them (and a good union contract). None of the credit hours in which I invested have been a “waste.”

Learned to weld once, a long-time ago, because it seemed interesting. Never once have used the skill, but glad I got the experience. Currently enrolled in an online Masters’ Program for social work. I’ll never use that degree. It has no practical value to me in terms of a dollar return. I just like to learn and be “stretched.“ The process of education and interaction, for me, brings personal value - however anyone else may see it.

Education brings opportunity for personal growth. The challenge of divergent views hones one own’s perspective and helps to either strengthen or modify personal conviction. Education, whether trade-oriented or degree-focused, has value beyond “the job,” at least in my opinion. Of course, I’m the odd duck here: kids grown, wife gone, no need to find the pot-o‘-gold at rainbow’s end, career-wise, although all those things were factors once-upon-a-time.

Your mileage may vary.
 

ahw01

Well-Known Member
At the minute I'm just looking to credit my FAA certs and knock over an online AS degree.

There don't seem to be many options but it could be a better investment than another warbird SIC.

Need someone to do an idiots guide, too many in state, out of state variables in the US system.

Alex.
 

Acrofox

All dragon~
So that’s your excuse? Not a rich white boy, therefore college is unattainable?
My wife isn’t a male, she somehow obtained a degree. Her sisters, the same. One recently earned a masters while raising 4 kids, and pregnant with her 5th. All three grew up in a single income household. Maybe if this was 1956, your “woe is me” argument would hold water. Not today.
You have diverged completely from the topic at hand. I’m talking about lightning, you’re ranting about lightning bugs. I got lucky as hell—I happened to be extremely good at something that was extremely in demand, and even growing up poor as heck, I made ~$100k in my first full year of work (1999) at 19. Most of the kids I knew growing up are still in my hometown, or close to it, working dead-end agricultural, construction, or retail jobs and living for the weekend, degree or not. Some are dead.

This isn’t about me. Yes, it would have been difficult for me to go to a brick-and-mortar school, but I likely could have found a way to make it work.

The point is that as soon as you get beyond the “does the applicant have a degree,” and you nudge into “did the applicant complete a 4-year degree in 4 years at a competitive (read: expensive) brick and mortar school” territory, you are screening primarily for social stratum.

End of Line
 

USMCmech

Well-Known Member
The point is that as soon as you get beyond the “does the applicant have a degree,” and you nudge into “did the applicant complete a 4-year degree in 4 years at a competitive (read: expensive) brick and mortar school” territory, you are screening primarily for social stratum.
Historically that was the point of having a liberal arts degree in the first place. College wasn't so much about education and expanding your mind as it was more an upper class finishing school where you learned about classical literature and philosophy.

It actually wasn't very expensive in the early to mid 20th century, but colleges were very selective academically. In a time when most didn't go to school past the 8th grade, high school grads were today's college graduates. Back then having a college degree in anything meant a person was educated well beyond the level of an average adult.

Today, anyone can get admitted to college (including mentally retarded downs kids) and graduate with a degree in a worthless field. It's actually much harder to enlist as a grunt in the Army than it is to enter college. The value of a degree is much less because everyone has one. Now you need a Masters. Sending everyone to college will make things even worse. Economics always rewards scarcity, education is irrelevant. Today you can make more as a welder than you can as a lawyer.

100 years ago, every house had wood floors. Wealthy people had rugs to cover those up in the parlor, Uber wealthy people had rugs covering every room in the house. Then in the 60s someone figured out how to make polyester carpet very cheaply. What was a luxury item of carpet was now a middle or even working class item and we wound up with carpet in bathrooms. Today, wood floors are the mark of wealth and carpet is cheap.
 
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