Logging time/Suggestions

turbojet28

Well-Known Member
I recently started my training at the local FBO for my PPL. I purchased the ASA Standard Pilot Logbook. I'm sure all the logbooks are generally the same, but is there anything bad about the ASA? I just want to make sure so that I can return it before marking it all up, if need be. On the same token, what types of things should I log as a PPL (in training)? My instructor has told me to record the number of landings, time, category, type (dual so far), and any remarks. Anything else you would recommend?

Also, I was thinking of ways which I could learn more and become a better, more safe pilot. I came up with the idea of putting together a notebook in which I record a brief of the flight, suggestions from my CFI (and myself), and a place for other notes. Then I plan on looking over all the suggestions/thoughts and studying up from what I thought needs to be worked on, and then reffering back to it on my next flight to make things practical. Does this seem like a good idea? Bad idea? Any suggestions about it?

Thank you so much to everyone here who gives such great advice!

---TurboJet28---
 

xdashdriver

Well-Known Member
Turbojet,

As far as your logbook goes, I would fill in all the appropriate blanks. Read FAR 61.51 to find out what the FAA requires you to log. I would be surprised if your CFI doesn't make the logbook entry for you for all of your dual flights. He'll know what to put in the remarks column, and he'll probably want to sign the entry and put his cert. number in there too.


As for your notebook idea, I think it is a good idea, if you can keep up with it and make it truly useful. Your CFI will love it if you follow up on things he has suggested.

Ray
 

turbojet28

Well-Known Member
Thanks for the reply. And ,yes, I should've clarified, my CFI is doing my logging, but explaining it as he goes, and I was just curious as to what others think.
 

aloft

New Member
A logbook's a logbook; the only thing I'd check is if it has all the various endorsements in the back (solo, solo xc, written, practical, high performance, instrument/multi/commercial written/practical, etc). My logbook is old and doesn't have these, nor does it have enough blank pages for them to be handwritten, so I have CFIs use the ground instruction pages. Seriously, this alone was almost sufficient reason for me to switch to a newer logbook (see next question).

Here's a logbook question for everybody: seems like most people switch to the big "pro" logbook at some point. If you're one of them, when did you switch? Did you wait to fill up your "starter" one? I know some of the academies start their students out with the pro logbook so there's no need to switch. Might be something worth considering.
 

xdashdriver

Well-Known Member
My recommendation is that once all your training is over with and you start your first job, use a computer logbook. Up until then you should use a paper logbook as your official record just because it's easier for CFIs to endorse it and it's easier to tote around with you.

A computerized logbook becomes VERY handy if you end up flying a bunch of aircraft and need to fill out insurance pilot questionnaires once a year. Every insurance company wants something different, and it saves a LOT of time being able to tell the computer software to filter whatever you need to answer the questions.

Ray
 

JHines

New Member
I suggest being conservative about entries to start. You might need to get a more complex logbook to do this. For example, it's good to have separate columns for "solo" and "PIC", and also separate columns for "cross-country" and "cross-country [more than 50NM]". That makes it easier to keep track of all the time categories you'll need for various ratings, and to audit the entries, if necessary, when you are adding up times for a checkride.
 

aloft

New Member
Speaking as an IT weenie, I'd strongly advise against a computer logbook being your ONLY logbook. It's far too easy to have a hard disk crash (or scratch a CD-R) and lose all your data. I keep my regular logbook and make a photocopy of each page as it's filled, as well as whenever I get a new endorsement. I also use www.logshare.com as an off-site backup to protect from loss of my paper copies to theft or fire (haven't bought one of those fireproof boxes yet...someday).
 

xdashdriver

Well-Known Member
Different FSDOs and examiners have different takes on this, but the Washington policy (from the Part 61/141 FAQs) is that for Part 61 training, it is not necessary to log your ground training in the same manner that you log your flight training. At the very least, the endorsement from the instructor before you take your written is suppsedly proof enough. Different instructors do it different ways. Some make a list of all the subjects covered in the "ground training" section of your logbook, then make an endorsement saying that they gave you that instruction. Others don't do anything special other than give you the endorsement. Others do it 141-style and log everything, every time you meet.

Part 141 is a different ball game. There, you will find that each ground lesson is logged, the main reason being is that you have to show that you have the requisite number of ground hours logged to meet the course requirements.

Ray
 

EatSleepFly

Well-Known Member
[ QUOTE ]
If you're one of them, when did you switch?

[/ QUOTE ]

As soon as I filled up the first one (the usual, standard size Jepp one), I switched to the bigger ASA "master" one. Its not much different really...just more room to write students names, and remarks in there big enough so it is readable. And it will probably last me ten years...that thing is huge. Incidentally, it does NOT have a place for endorsements, but I think there is probably sufficient room on the notes pages, and the blank pages at the end to fit all of the endorsements necessary.

I second the recommendation to get a computerized logbook when you start flying professionally- it makes looking back on things a lot easier (I use LogbookPro, its great). But like aloft said, I certainly wouldn't have that be my *only* logbook.
 

xdashdriver

Well-Known Member
As for my computer log....I just print it out once another page is full, and keep a backup on removable media.

Ray
 

Pilot Hopeful

Well-Known Member
How lucky can a CFI be? I think we should ask TurboJet28's flight instructor.

Here is a student with initiative:
[ QUOTE ]
I came up with the idea of putting together a notebook in which I record a brief of the flight, suggestions from my CFI (and myself), and a place for other notes. Then I plan on looking over all the suggestions/thoughts and studying up from what I thought needs to be worked on, and then referring back to it on my next flight to make things practical.

[/ QUOTE ]
TurboJet28, I am sure your instructor is pleased that you are making strong efforts to enhance the learning process: recording lesson performance, studying before the lesson, and looking to become a safe, conscientious pilot.

Remember all the strategies you implement, so you can share them with your students when you become a flight instructor. For now, the best goal to have is to be the best student pilot you can be.
 
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