Little advice needed.

ppragman

FLIPY FLAPS!
When I got back from Hawaii I had no choice but to snag the quickest job I could get, and now I'm working in kodiak. However, I was offered a job in town flying that will let me go back to college, and I don't have to sleep on a mechanics couch in kodiak. How does a guy go about telling his job that he needs to be back in town without being a bastard.

-pat
 

TheWife

New Member
Tell them you appreciate the opportunity to work for their company, tell them you will work the 2 weeks if they need you to, and tell them you have to do what will get you further ahead for your future.
 

Number1atNumber2

Tries to keep it fun.
Best thing you can do is be as honest as you can with them. Definatly give them 2 weeks notice! Like TheWife said: tell them you appreciated working for them, but you have an opportunity to go back to college and that it's something you feel you need to do. I would figure most reasonable people would understand that. You boss may not like it, but you need to do what's right for you and your life.

Having to sleep on a mechanic's couch isn't exactly great quality of life, and I don't think anyone would blame you for wanting to do better for yourself.
 

ljg

Well-Known Member
Going back to school - bada## - best of luck to you.

As for your original question, :yeahthat:.
 

C150J

Well-Known Member
Changing jobs as a young person is tough, and I commend you for being conscientious (that says a lot about your character). That being said, do not feel one ounce of guilt for taking a job that will enable you to live in town and, more importantly, go back to school. I would politely inform your current employer that you have a new opportunity that will allow you to continue your education, offering him/her two week's notice.

This won't be the last time you'll have to change jobs, but it certainly gets easier.

J.
 

aeroman2

New Member
Do whatever you need to do to get back to school, this is very important in any line of work you get into, I'm not a professional pilot, but I can assure you that it is the same in any field, get more school!
 

dc3flyer

Well-Known Member
How long has it been since you started working for this current company, 3 months? I would feel a little bad about quitting a flying job that soon.

A few questions I would ask myself would be: How much training did you receive from this company? Do you feel (even without a 'contract') that you have paid for your training at this point? Being in AK, will this employer black mark you with possible future employers in the area if he feels you are screwing him? I guess the biggest question I would ask myself is, if this other job ceases to exist in 6 months do you think your current employer would re-hire you if you quit now?

I am not saying don't do it, just think about how it will effect you in the future. Aviation is very small community and I would imagine in AK it even gets smaller.
 

jwp_145

GhostRider in the Sky
How long has it been since you started working for this current company, 3 months? I would feel a little bad about quitting a flying job that soon.

A few questions I would ask myself would be: How much training did you receive from this company? Do you feel (even without a 'contract') that you have paid for your training at this point? Being in AK, will this employer black mark you with possible future employers in the area if he feels you are screwing him? I guess the biggest question I would ask myself is, if this other job ceases to exist in 6 months do you think your current employer would re-hire you if you quit now?

I am not saying don't do it, just think about how it will effect you in the future. Aviation is very small community and I would imagine in AK it even gets smaller.
That is excellent advice. I try and always apply that question.
 

tonyw

Well-Known Member
Be honest and tell then you've been offered a better job. Tell them you appreciated the opportunity to work for them and give them a resignation letter.

Be professional and courteous about it.

People leave jobs all the time for better opportunities. No employer should hold that against someone.
 

Toria

Well-Known Member
Great that you have the opportunity to go to college!!!

I am assuming that the job you have is OK and you are leaving for a better opportunity to build your future, not that you have a gripe about where you are now.

Write a proper resignation letter that includes why you are leaving, some of the positive things about the job you are leaving, whatever notice (two, three weeks) you are giving them, and thank them for the opportunity they gave you. Your current employer should not hold this decision against you, just keep it positive, even if they make your last few days difficult there. If they counter-offer, make sure that college stays in your future. It is that important.

Good luck in your new position!!
 

ppragman

FLIPY FLAPS!
Great that you have the opportunity to go to college!!!

I am assuming that the job you have is OK and you are leaving for a better opportunity to build your future, not that you have a gripe about where you are now.

Write a proper resignation letter that includes why you are leaving, some of the positive things about the job you are leaving, whatever notice (two, three weeks) you are giving them, and thank them for the opportunity they gave you. Your current employer should not hold this decision against you, just keep it positive, even if they make your last few days difficult there. If they counter-offer, make sure that college stays in your future. It is that important.

Good luck in your new position!!
No I love where I'm at right now it's the best job I've ever had, and seen as how it is about the only way I can go back to school if I leave, I feel stuck between a rock and a hard place, that being said, the other place I'm going to is supposed to be great as well, so maybe win win.

I talked to them today, and I'll be working part time for both initially and full time for the in town gig as the school year comes around. Worked out well.
 
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