Life insurance denial on Medical application

Bandit_Driver

Gold Member
What is the FAA looking in question 18T. "Rejection for life or health insurance"?

hypothetically:

What happens to the airman if he/she answers yes? Does it open can of worms with the FAA Medical department?
 

FlightSurgeon

Well-Known Member
What is the FAA looking in question 18T. "Rejection for life or health insurance"?

hypothetically:

What happens to the airman if he/she answers yes? Does it open can of worms with the FAA Medical department?
Hi Bandit_Driver,

Not necessarily, I think it it another way of looking for undisclosed medical issues. I imagine they would look at the issue that caused the denial and make a decision on whether it pertains to flight safety.

Best Regards,

Aaron Florkowski, MD
FAA designated Aviation Medical Examiner
www.kansascityame.com
 

bafanguy

Well-Known Member
Check with this mob to see what, if anything, is in your "dossier". I'd imagine the FAA is familiar with them:

 

Pilot Fighter

Well-Known Member
This is a vague question, a fishing expedition. Here's why I'd never feel a need to confirm a denial.

"Denials" really don't happen. Insurance companies offer policies with certain qualifying criteria. Insurance companies may not be able to offer a policy but I don't think that's the same as a denial.

If I apply for a job as a pilot and get a letter telling me that 121 experience is required, I don't view that as a "denial".

Anybody can buy an insurance policy, it's just a matter of cost. The inability for an insurance company to offer a policy isn't the same as a denial in my book.
 

Bandit_Driver

Gold Member
This is a vague question, a fishing expedition. Here's why I'd never feel a need to confirm a denial.

"Denials" really don't happen. Insurance companies offer policies with certain qualifying criteria. Insurance companies may not be able to offer a policy but I don't think that's the same as a denial.

If I apply for a job as a pilot and get a letter telling me that 121 experience is required, I don't view that as a "denial".

Anybody can buy an insurance policy, it's just a matter of cost. The inability for an insurance company to offer a policy isn't the same as a denial in my book.
IMO Failure to offer a policy is a denial/rejection by the company. Unfortunately it isn't what the pilot thinks, it is what the FAA deems a rejection.

If they offer with unacceptable terms, conditions, or rates that is another story.
 

Pilot Fighter

Well-Known Member
IMO Failure to offer a policy is a denial/rejection by the company.
So, we traded opinions. What does the FAA actually deem a rejection? Citations please.


The value of the question has diminished. Since the ACA in 2009, insurance denials are very rare. For health insurance, pre-existing conditions must be covered. So, no denials.

Prior to the ACA, you could change jobs and be denied health insurance based on an existing condition. This is why the question is on the medical application.

For life insurance, group plans are guaranteed-issue, so no denials. Outside of a group plan, most plans are guarantee-issued, so few denials.

So, about the only place denials could happen are with individually underwritten life insurance plans that are not guarantee-issue. In these cases, plans have criteria. If you don't meet the criteria you aren't offered the plan. Is it a denial if an insurance company doesn't offer you a plan because you don't meet the objective criteria? Maybe.




 
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