Last of the Legacy Hornet

Lawman

Well-Known Member
#1
I had no idea it was the final time to see a Navy C model squadron go to sea. Crazy to me because the last Tomcat cruise doesn’t feel like it was that long ago and here we are and the end of another aircrafts twilight moments.

Navy F/A-18 Legacy Hornets Have Taken Their Last Cruise Aboard A U.S. Aircraft Carrier

For our Navy guys in the know what’s the plan for the Airwing now? Still gonna embark those last few Marine single seat squadrons to fill our the workload? Navy just whole shot handing over the keys to the FRS and aggressors to walk away?


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PenguinAviator

Looks sharp in a tuxedo
#2
With the legacies literally falling apart, I'm surprised they even lasted this long. Until we pump the brakes on this op-tempo, we'll be sending the supers to the boneyard in less than 10 years.
 

Lawman

Well-Known Member
#3
With the legacies literally falling apart, I'm surprised they even lasted this long. Until we pump the brakes on this op-tempo, we'll be sending the supers to the boneyard in less than 10 years.
That’s unfortunately not surprising.

Little known fact to most, the Raptors are already half way through their service life.


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Pilot Fighter

Well-Known Member
#4
With the legacies literally falling apart, I'm surprised they even lasted this long. Until we pump the brakes on this op-tempo, we'll be sending the supers to the boneyard in less than 10 years.
The production line almost closed a couple of years ago before Kuwait made the purchase that kept the Supers alive. Now, the Navy will be buying 124 in the next five years.
 

PenguinAviator

Looks sharp in a tuxedo
#5
Not to hijack this thread but relevant discussion: every time I see a P-8A bouncing in the pattern it just pisses me off. Here we are abusing an airplane (737) doing touch and go pilot training events... all.. damn.. day. Let's see how long that airframe lasts doing something it wasn't designed to do in terms of cycles and expected longevity. Oh well, in 10-15 years L3 or Boeing will get a bajillion million dollar contract to rework the frame/wings on the entire fleet.
 

trafficinsight

Well-Known Member
#7
Not to hijack this thread but relevant discussion: every time I see a P-8A bouncing in the pattern it just pisses me off. Here we are abusing an airplane (737) doing touch and go pilot training events... all.. damn.. day. Let's see how long that airframe lasts doing something it wasn't designed to do in terms of cycles and expected longevity. Oh well, in 10-15 years L3 or Boeing will get a bajillion million dollar contract to rework the frame/wings on the entire fleet.
I saw one in Kalispell doing just that I thought it was weird.

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kaudbron

Well-Known Member
#9
View attachment 44464

Yes, but no. We're not smart enough to think like that.

Oh and the FSDO will not grant P-8 pilots a 737 type aside the first initial guys that snuck it through the inspector when the program was in its infant stage.
Try a different FSDO? I was offered a Legacy Herc type and I had no experience in one at all, I politey turned that one down and said the L-382J will suffice.
 

Pilot Fighter

Well-Known Member
#10
Not to hijack this thread but relevant discussion: every time I see a P-8A bouncing in the pattern it just pisses me off. Here we are abusing an airplane (737) doing touch and go pilot training events... all.. damn.. day. Let's see how long that airframe lasts doing something it wasn't designed to do in terms of cycles and expected longevity. Oh well, in 10-15 years L3 or Boeing will get a bajillion million dollar contract to rework the frame/wings on the entire fleet.
Well, at least there will continue to be established manufacturer depot maintenance for the type instead of a hastily conceived SLEP program.

Are we bouncing them harder than the airlines? If not, 75,000 cycles buys some years even with an aggressive ops tempo.
 

Cptnchia

Dissatisfied Customer
#11
Not to hijack this thread but relevant discussion: every time I see a P-8A bouncing in the pattern it just pisses me off. Here we are abusing an airplane (737) doing touch and go pilot training events... all.. damn.. day. Let's see how long that airframe lasts doing something it wasn't designed to do in terms of cycles and expected longevity. Oh well, in 10-15 years L3 or Boeing will get a bajillion million dollar contract to rework the frame/wings on the entire fleet.
Airlines do this all day long with the type. Usually get 20-30 years out of the airframe. If it was an Airbus, you might have an argument.
 

Lawman

Well-Known Member
#12
I saw one in Kalispell doing just that I thought it was weird.

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Yeah see in the military we like to use the simulator for instrument work and the aircraft for pattern work.... because that’s the way it’s always been and by god nobody is gonna change it!

I had a squadron commander that would literally spend a 3.0 training sortie in the pattern the whole time. Nobody wanted to fly with that guy, and luckily he only did just enough to maintain his 60 day currency.
 

trafficinsight

Well-Known Member
#13
Yeah see in the military we like to use the simulator for instrument work and the aircraft for pattern work.... because that’s the way it’s always been and by god nobody is gonna change it!

I had a squadron commander that would literally spend a 3.0 training sortie in the pattern the whole time. Nobody wanted to fly with that guy, and luckily he only did just enough to maintain his 60 day currency.
It was cool to watch, why Kalispell? Is there a base up that way somewhere?

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Lawman

Well-Known Member
#14
It was cool to watch, why Kalispell? Is there a base up that way somewhere?

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No, nearest West Coast is Whidbey Island, though that could mean nothing in this case. VP units train to missions beyond sub hunting. The Orion’s were actually The high demand surveillance aircraft for a while because their cameras were second to none. My friend that flew them used to joke he actually never spent any of his career hunting subs, unless Somalia bought some we didn’t know about.

Could just be in a det somewhere (Malmstrom for instance) and doing continuation training with available time.
 
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MikeD

Administrator
Staff member
#15
No, nearest West Coast is Whidbey Island, though that could mean nothing in this case. VP units train to missions beyond sub hunting. The Orion’s were actually The high demand surveillance aircraft for a while because their cameras were second to none. My friend that flew them used to joke he actually never spent any of his career hunting subs, unless Somalia bought some we didn’t know about.

Could just be in a det somewhere (Malmstrom for instance) and doing continuation training with available time.
Malmstrom is an AF heliport, ever since it got BRACd and lost it's tanker squadrons 20 years ago. But your point still stands.
 

Lawman

Well-Known Member
#17
Malmstrom is an AF heliport, ever since it got BRACd and lost it's tanker squadrons 20 years ago. But your point still stands.
All I know about Maelstrom is it’s not the end of the Earth, but you’re close enough to see it from there.

I didn’t even know it existed until I started looking at overnight spots for routes across country during PCS.


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