Languages

MissedApproach

Well-Known Member
I know that English is the language of aviation, but are your odds of being hired better if you know another language? Does anyone speak another language and find it useful in aviation? Just curious because next year in college I want to either finish learning German or start with Spanish.
 

secretapproach

New Member
You should keep learning German AND start Spanish. Don't know if it'll help you find a pilot job but, in my opinion, it's one of the most horizon-widening things you'll ever do! Viel Erfolg!
 

Virusss

New Member
I read/write/speak fluent English/Russian. I dont know if it will help me get an airline job but I surely like it. When ever I get hurt by myself I can say sh*t without anyone around to hear. But when something bad happens to me and im around younger kids and adults. I like to say the curse word in Russian. Then there all like huh? what you say?

Vsem Ruskim Privet Ahaaahahahaha.

(Dont worry its not a curse word it jsut says Hello to all Ruski ahaha)
 

eodfe

New Member
I speak three languages, American, British and Austrailian!
Oh Yeah, New Zealander also.
When I get drunk, I can speak any language on this, or any other planet!
 

Derg

Cap, Roci
Staff member
[ QUOTE ]
I speak three languages, American, British and Austrailian!

[/ QUOTE ]

Alright smart guy, what's a "tipper jilly" and what does "Bob's Yer Uncle" mean?


(No hints Iain, ya redcoat!)
 

flyguy

Well-Known Member
[ QUOTE ]
I speak three languages, American, British and Austrailian!
Oh Yeah, New Zealander also.

[/ QUOTE ]

Same here, I speak all of those. And some Canadian too.


Here's a story -
My father works in International admissions at a University. Every student applying from a non-English speaking country must pass a TOFL (Test of English as a Forign Language). One day his boss comes storming into his office upset because he had admitted a Canadian student without a TOFL score. My fathers asks him "Do you know what language they speak in Canada?" He replies "Of course I do. Canadian."
 

MissedApproach

Well-Known Member
Wow, you're all so learned! I never considered myself to be trilingual until now!

But seriouly, if I became fluent in another language would I have a better chance of getting picked up by an international carrier. Or, do foreign airlines typically only hire people from their own country, even though they all seem to be trained here anyway? A job with Lufthansa sounds pretty damn sweet!

Whenever I hear that Lufthansa A-340 come into PHX he sounds pretty German to me.
 

davetheflyer

New Member
Honestly, I don't think it makes a difference unless you want to work for a foreign airline. English is the international language of aviation and ATC in other countries are required to speak it (with varying degrees of skill). I don't even think that my job application had a place for language skills.

If you want to actually work in a foreign country, it would be helpful though. Additionally, I have a friend who specializes in training Hispanic pilots (and I've flown with a variety of international students myself), so multiple languages could be a plus as a CFI.

BTW, in addition to speaking English and Southern, hablo espanol un poco tambien. And I can fake Canadian, eh.
 

secretapproach

New Member
[ QUOTE ]
A job with Lufthansa sounds pretty damn sweet!

Whenever I hear that Lufthansa A-340 come into PHX he sounds pretty German to me.

[/ QUOTE ]

MissedApproach: Here's Lufthansa's recruitment website.

Lufthansa pilot recruitment site

You have to have EU citizenship or permanent work authorization for Germany just to apply. And you can't be a day over 32 years and 364 days old (taken from the website!). They require you to speak and write German and English fluently. There's a pretty tough aptitude test (weeder!) you have to take in German. I wanted to fly for them for a while and would still love to but even though I've worked in Germany for several years, I don't have a permanent work permit. Plus I don't meet their minimum flying experience requirements of course with my piston single experience.


But their starting salary for FOs is €52,000. So it's a good gig if you can get it. They satisfy most of their requirements from their in-house training in Bremen and Arizona. To start that training, you can't be older than 27 AND cannot hold any pilot license when you start!

I know a guy who was supposed to start a new hire class with them this month but they postponed it indefinitely. They're not in as much trouble as some US airlines but their not doing so hot right now, either!

But even after all the negative things I said about the chances of getting in with them: If you don't try, you'll definitely never get in!
 

JaceTheAce

Well-Known Member
privyet ruski! muey khui ochen fekushney!! ...just kidding, sorry for that foul language in Russian. No seriously if you know Russian and you're pissed at a passenger you can just say call 'em a khui sebachi and they wouldn't know. I am fluent in reading/speaking/writing Spanish from my family background, but don't have the technical vocabulary down to be able to use in flying. I have know clue what the word "Roger" is in Spanish... The only radio vocab word I know in Spanish is "adelante" - that sorta means "over" and that you are ready for the other person to talk...That's only from hearing my grandpa say it.

Since English is the only language in the aviation world, I don't think it'd be a benefit to know anything else. But, on your resume it might look good because the interviewer may see you as a person with knowledge and understanding of different culture. The always like to see a wide range of interests and abilities, so I think it'd be a plus to put in on there that you speak a second language.
 
Top