Jumpseat etiquitte (again)

Autothrust Blue

"I’d make a suggestion but you won’t listen”
Refresher:

(1) On most carriers, including the Mormon Air Force, the Captain's permission is required to ride on a jumpseat priority, even if you are assigned a seat in the cabin. Please make yourself known to the Captain and the Forward FA.
(2) On most carriers, the dress code for the jumpseat is business casual or uniform.

Please see http://www.jumpseatinfo.org/ .

Carry on.
 

bkey79

Well-Known Member
Guess I just don't care enough? Ya have a SKW guy not ask? If they have a seat in the back and don't check in then I never know. No harm no foul I guess. I see a ton of pilots in the back and assume they are either non-rev or dead heading. I however ask when jump seating every time, and most the time try to say hi when dead-heading if the crew isn't busy. If they are in the middle of checklists then I just go find my seat.
 
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Jordan93

Well-Known Member
I won't ask when I'm dead heading or non rev but when I deplane I always say something like "thanks for the ride" or "thanks for getting me home." I always ask if I can ride up front.
 

Autothrust Blue

"I’d make a suggestion but you won’t listen”
This came up on the facebooks like two days ago, are you still that angry about it? :p
I got another blip about it today (people think I'm still a rep), unrelated to the first deal and not on our airline.

Twice in one week gets me pissy.
 

av8tr1

"Never tell me the odds!"
Whats the appropriate method if you are flying on a paid ticket? Any reason to introduce yourself?
 

JordanD

Honorary Member
No, neither with non reving or deadheading. We're busy or just don't care.
And the best reason "because I don't have to."
If the crew is readily visible, standing in the doorway, or we catch a glance and they're not busy I'll offer a hello, because hell, that's just being polite. But I'm not going to stand with my two bags like a doofus, awkwardly listening to a departure brief, and then waiting for the break in passengers to go take my seat. Getting in the FAs way the whole time.
 

Cherokee_Cruiser

Well-Known Member
Have had a CA ask for an entire set of 3 DH FAs to come up and check in with him and then explained to them it's usually a good idea to say hi to the CA. :rolleyes: This was after they were already seated, and about 12 minutes prior to push. All 3 came up then. Poor girls were too new (all reserve crew) to know any better. This particular guy does suffer from 4 stripe syndrome.
 

BobDDuck

Island Bus Driver
This came up on the facebooks like two days ago, are you still that angry about it? :p
I was the second ping (see what I did there?) he got about this.

We had a Skyweezy jumpseater who a) didn't understand the concept of "asking" for a ride and b) was dressed in a manner not in accordance with almost all airline's jumpseat policy. Thankfully the captain I was flying with didn't care and there was an open seat in the back. But I reached out to @Autothrust Blue to see if he could put out a reminder as this was not the first time it's happened. To be fair, we've had a few Delta and United guys who have made the same mistake.
 

MikeD

Administrator
Staff member
I was the second ping (see what I did there?) he got about this.

We had a Skyweezy jumpseater who a) didn't understand the concept of "asking" for a ride and b) was dressed in a manner not in accordance with almost all airline's jumpseat policy. Thankfully the captain I was flying with didn't care and there was an open seat in the back. But I reached out to @Autothrust Blue to see if he could put out a reminder as this was not the first time it's happened. To be fair, we've had a few Delta and United guys who have made the same mistake.
Are guys just getting lazy, or are these things not formally taught anymore? I can remember 23 years ago in cargo, we had an about a half day course on the concept of jumpseating. What it is, how it is we are able to take part, how it is we can reciprocate, how to do it, what to do, what not to do, and how it can be lost if not done correctly. Many official and unofficial "thou shalt's" and official "thou shalt not's" were taught and reiterated, like the above items, so there was never any question of ambiguity. They were known knowns.
 
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