Jobs during F-word

mwflyer

Well-Known Member
Another thing to look into if you’re looking railroad is Rail Traffic Control. Initial pay sucks while you’re training but depending on the rail road you can get into 6 figures eventually. I interviewed with Norfolk Southern (?) in Pittsburgh between the AF and FAA but didn’t make it through the initial selection process after doing the personality test. Found that odd since they said they love taking air traffic controllers but me and the other ATC there both didn’t make it past round 1. They hired 4 or 5 out of the 20+ people they invited to interview.
Good point. Great QOL too, as you are limited to a max 9 hour duty day, due to hours of service. its always an 8 hour shift, the only way you ever approach that 9 hour limit is if your relief is late.
 

NovemberEcho

Dergs favorite member
Good point. Great QOL too, as you are limited to a max 9 hour duty day, due to hours of service. its always an 8 hour shift, the only way you ever approach that 9 hour limit is if your relief is late.
ehhh not so good qol until you got seniority. You pretty much don’t have a set schedule and are on call all the time
 

Skåning

Well-Known Member
Another good gig with no experience is being a driver for a food company like Sysco. They go around to restaurants and drop off food and supplies, home every night. You can make six figures over time, with schedules and routes being seniority based. We have a friend who works there and makes bank with just a HS diploma, but they're a little down at the moment because restaurants aren't back in full swing yet.

 

mwflyer

Well-Known Member
ehhh not so good qol until you got seniority. You pretty much don’t have a set schedule and are on call all the time
It wasn’t like that at my shop (CSX). There were some guys on the relief schedules, but they knew that, and weren’t on call.
 

JDean3204

Well-Known Member
Another good gig with no experience is being a driver for a food company like Sysco. They go around to restaurants and drop off food and supplies, home every night. You can make six figures over time, with schedules and routes being seniority based. We have a friend who works there and makes bank with just a HS diploma, but they're a little down at the moment because restaurants aren't back in full swing yet.


I will have about 6 months of the post 9-11 GI Bill left after this next semester of business school. I hate business school, decided it would be a good back up plan but... nope not for this guy. I’m probably going to look into a good CDL program that is covered under the GI Bill and forget the degree. I’d rather drive and load/unload all day than stare at charts and graphs in an office.

Sysco seems like a good place, high pace though. Any job that I can work hard and make 60-100k will be a decent backup plan if my job goes bye bye. I’ll just have to get the wife back to working as well :D
 

NovemberEcho

Dergs favorite member
It wasn’t like that at my shop (CSX). There were some guys on the relief schedules, but they knew that, and weren’t on call.
NS is pretty small so maybe that’s why their schedule was so much worse. I know their starting pay is quite a bit less than some of the bigger rail roads
 

swakid8

Well-Known Member
The course I got covers all the languages. Javascript has come pretty naturally to me.
I am still trying to get CSS down. At the moment I am working on that and studying to renew my network+ and security+ certifications. I was a system administrator while in the military for 9 years.


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ASpilot2be

Qbicle seat warmer
I am still trying to get CSS down. At the moment I am working on that and studying to renew my network+ and security+ certifications. I was a system administrator while in the military for 9 years.


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I like CSS. Seems fairly straightforward.
 

azmedic

Well-Known Member
I am still trying to get CSS down. At the moment I am working on that and studying to renew my network+ and security+ certifications. I was a system administrator while in the military for 9 years.


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Perhaps I should dust off my CCNA from almost 20 years ago. Is that even worth anything anymore?


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NovemberEcho

Dergs favorite member
Perhaps I should dust off my CCNA from almost 20 years ago. Is that even worth anything anymore?


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I’m assuming you guys are talking about programming languages. My dad had a consulting company that basically existed because the only coding he knew was what he learned in the 80’s. Companies had legacy systems and with Y2K coming they needed to update them but none of the new programmers coming along knew the old languages.
 

mwflyer

Well-Known Member
Ads like these, starting to pop up on that other forum page. Instead of ATP and Other flight school ads.

View attachment 54631
$50 an hour, home every night, benefits, no nights or weekends. Any regional FO that gets that gig might not go back.

although, I have friends that do hvac work, The no nights and weekends is not something they are familiar with. It’s not every night, but if a job runs long, or their is an emergency. Also, have one weekend a month, or every other weekend on call for emergencies. However, they make a ton of money on the weekend, as it’s all OT, with a $200 call out fee on top of it.
 

Roger Roger

Paid to sleep, fly for fun
$50 an hour, home every night, benefits, no nights or weekends. Any regional FO that gets that gig might not go back.

although, I have friends that do hvac work, The no nights and weekends is not something they are familiar with. It’s not every night, but if a job runs long, or their is an emergency. Also, have one weekend a month, or every other weekend on call for emergencies. However, they make a ton of money on the weekend, as it’s all OT, with a $200 call out fee on top of it.
Like any other skilled trade-someone who can follow the plans and do an acceptable job will be alright when things are good, but not recession proof. The really smart guys who can troubleshoot, the ones who get called when everyone else is out of ideas....they’ll always have work.
 

azmedic

Well-Known Member
I’m assuming you guys are talking about programming languages. My dad had a consulting company that basically existed because the only coding he knew was what he learned in the 80’s. Companies had legacy systems and with Y2K coming they needed to update them but none of the new programmers coming along knew the old languages.
CCNA is Cisco networking certification


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Max Power

Well-Known Member
So, I’ve bought American Truck (and Euro Truck) Simulator in anticipation of, well, whatever. Plus, I’m a gearhead and love machines, a CDL was going to be my next “bucket list” thing. I started training to drive a school bus many years ago but never got the CDL. Wish I had. That’s another option too, if you can handle dealing with loud kids and the pains of local driving. Local districts pay best (my Dad did it as a retirement gig and usually training is free.) Not sure about contracts if they train you, but it would be a way to get a Class B CDL with air brakes and passenger endorsements.

Anyway, the hardest I’ve seen in the trucking sim is backing a long truck into a tiny space. As pilots, we’re used to oversteering and judging where wheels will track. I’ve even pushed large airplanes with a tug but backing a truck is one of those skills that seems like it would be tough to master. Like aviation, lots of OJT and learning in real life. Those of you who’ve farmed or launched boats might have easier time


I’m glad I have a bachelors now, but I’m not sure I really want to try out the paralegal field it was intended for. I’ve never been one to sit behind a desk. I’m about 50/50 on whether my regional survives so who knows?
 

Max Power

Well-Known Member
I’ve also been working a lot on my 89 Mustang GT convertible in my covid induced semi-retirement and have started going to the pull and pay yard for parts. If you want to practice wrenching, it’s not a bad way to learn. The cadavers there don’t care if you break something and if you search eBay, car forums,etc. you can find what parts people are willing to pay for ( if you don’t destroy them getting them off).

There’s something sort of zen like about wrenching on a car that no one cares about anymore and using its parts to keep your car alive.
 

MikeD

Administrator
Staff member
So, I’ve bought American Truck (and Euro Truck) Simulator in anticipation of, well, whatever. Plus, I’m a gearhead and love machines, a CDL was going to be my next “bucket list” thing. I started training to drive a school bus many years ago but never got the CDL. Wish I had. That’s another option too, if you can handle dealing with loud kids and the pains of local driving. Local districts pay best (my Dad did it as a retirement gig and usually training is free.) Not sure about contracts if they train you, but it would be a way to get a Class B CDL with air brakes and passenger endorsements.

Anyway, the hardest I’ve seen in the trucking sim is backing a long truck into a tiny space. As pilots, we’re used to oversteering and judging where wheels will track. I’ve even pushed large airplanes with a tug but backing a truck is one of those skills that seems like it would be tough to master. Like aviation, lots of OJT and learning in real life. Those of you who’ve farmed or launched boats might have easier time
backing a double/tandem trailer through a serpentine is always a fun exercise too.
 
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