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JetBlue and ALPA has an AIP!

#81
Flying 10 days a month is a lot on reserve IMO.
Hell, flying five days a month was a lot when I was bidding reserve. You know, until the ugly purple menace came around and ruined everything.
Meh. Not flying while on reserve is great for people that live in base. As a commuter, I'd rather be flying than sitting in a crash pad. But that's the beauty of having different contracts and different workloads at the different carriers. There is no one size fits all in what pilots want in a dream job.
 

Nick

Well-Known Member
#82
Flying 10 days a month is a lot on reserve IMO.
I agree -- what would be the point of reserve? I wouldn't have bid reserve seasonally if I thought I'd end up flying 10 days per month. I'm flying 11 days this month on a 97 hour line, and I got to choose the flying.

Seasonally though...I enjoyed flying three workdays between Christmas and May 1. I'll be saying hello again to reserve again this fall.
 

ATN_Pilot

Socialist Pig Member
#83
It just shows the difference in mentality. At the purple menace, reserves are to be abused because they’re junior fodder. At real majors, reserve is just a legitimate lifestyle bid.
 
#84
I agree -- what would be the point of reserve?
Well, as with any airline reserves act as a surge accumulator. They fill gaps in the schedule. Unlike other airlines, WN uses reserves to cover open time that they don’t want to pay premium for.

Then they gamble that they won’t need those reserves for things like sick calls or winter storms. When those events happen pilots already flying are rerouted or junior manned into additional flying, which is almost always at time and a half or double time. It can be lucrative, but also infuriating.

So I can see it from both sides. As a company, an asset sitting at home from December until May getting paid to play XBox is inefficient. As a pilot, I want to get paid as much as possible for as little work as possible. But as a pilot who has been furloughed a bunch of times, I want the company to be as lean as possible. So I’m torn.

When I was on reserve I commuted, so I was happy to fly because it meant not paying for a hotel. If I lived in base at this airline I’d hate reserve, except for in the summer since reserves are contractually protected from being junior manned.

Bottom line, if someone is considering WN as a potential career, forget everything you know about how Airlines run, because they play from their own sheet of music and it’s very rarely similar to other Airlines - for better and sometimes for worse.

Now... back to JetBlue’s AIP?




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Nick

Well-Known Member
#85
It just shows the difference in mentality. At the purple menace, reserves are to be abused because they’re junior fodder. At real majors, reserve is just a legitimate lifestyle bid.
I also think that if a category and/or base is understaffed to the point where reserve does become a fly-every-single-day situation, there ought to be some work rules in place to at least let the reserves work the system in their own way. Fly premium on days off on top of guarantee, payback days, etc. Fortunately my predecessors had set up a good system on the reserve side of things and junior people who can't get a line can at least work the system a bit, too.
 

Nick

Well-Known Member
#86
Well, as with any airline reserves act as a surge accumulator. They fill gaps in the schedule. Unlike other airlines, WN uses reserves to cover open time that they don’t want to pay premium for.
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Oh I agree -- I meant mostly what would be the point of someone bidding 20-50% in their seat voluntarily bidding reserve. There wouldn't be any advantage, in that case.

I think it's nice that reserve can be almost like a different job opportunity, for those who live in base anyway. Break up the year a bit without even changing planes or anything.
 

jtrain609

I'm a carnal, organic anagram.
#87
I agree -- what would be the point of reserve? I wouldn't have bid reserve seasonally if I thought I'd end up flying 10 days per month. I'm flying 11 days this month on a 97 hour line, and I got to choose the flying.

Seasonally though...I enjoyed flying three workdays between Christmas and May 1. I'll be saying hello again to reserve again this fall.
I've sat short call every day I've been on for the last year.

Some months I've credited 95 hours.

I'm confident the system will be fixed soon.
 

Jordan93

Well-Known Member
#90
Dad bids reserve at SJI. He worked 2 days in April and hasn’t gotten called in yet for May. He’s about to dequal and will probably have to go to ATL to do 3 bounces if he doesn’t get called in the next few weeks. NYC reserve CA at 9E is rough. Only 12 days off a month and you can bet you’re going to get used all 18 days of reserve.
 

L-16B

Well-Known Member
#91
Dad bids reserve at SJI. He worked 2 days in April and hasn’t gotten called in yet for May. He’s about to dequal and will probably have to go to ATL to do 3 bounces if he doesn’t get called in the next few weeks. NYC reserve CA at 9E is rough. Only 12 days off a month and you can bet you’re going to get used all 18 days of reserve.
That’s pretty much every widebody FO at AA. Dunno about captains as I assume they can get a landing on a trip.
 

BobDDuck

Island Bus Driver
#95
That’s pretty good. Captains seem to fly less than first officers on narrowbody here. I don’t get why. Maybe out of base pickups.
In general captains have more vacation time every year so they are less likely to have to call in sick to go to a critical event they can't hold off via bidding. FOs tend to have to us sick calls to get critical days off. That leads to higher reserve utilization for the right seat.