Jet flying tips

vheissu

Well-Known Member
Hey guys,

Well after 3900 hours of buzzing around in slow turboprops, I am finally going to be flying something with a swept wing. The plane is a Hawker 800A. Any tips, either airplane specific, sim tricks, or just jet flying in general? Trying to get ahead here, as its going to be a big leap from a Twin Otter.

-J
 

smack300

Well-Known Member
You leaving Elsinore? Dang I was about to go jumping again soon ha, well congrats on your new adventure!
 

dustoff17

Well-Known Member
You won't have any problems based on what you're flying now. Things happen a bit quicker so if your used to thinking 5 steps ahead, plan on 15; if you're used to 10, plan 20, etc....

Push and trees get bigger. Pull, they get smaller.........congrats on the new position!
Where are you training?
 

cmhumphr

Well-Known Member
I would imagine it's just a speed transition and learning how to manage descents etc. Other than that, I'd be willing to bet it files like an airplane. Congratulations on the Hawker position!
 

vheissu

Well-Known Member
Yeah the gear is going to be a little change.. it's been a while haha. Thanks guys. Hoping to get some training material from the company to get all of the important stuff memorized before indoc.

I know its been said over and over again on this site, but its all about who you know. I had two interviews in the past month, and I got both from getting recommended by friends and people I've flown with. Also, pretty sure a JCer got hooked up at my old job. I'll let him speak up if he wants to.
 

TFaudree_ERAU

Mashin' dem buttons
Hawkers are like big 172s.

Don't flare them too much. Hawker pilots LOVE to flare the damn thing, and it never works out like they hope. I've seen guys land it and the nose wheel is like 37 feet in the air. Keep the pitch attitude lower and let ground effect do its thing.
 

N519AT

Ahh! This is how I change this!
In the sim don't go blasting around at 250 kts. 170 or 180 will do just fine. It will give you more time to get acclimated to the plane and more time to work through checklists.

V1 cuts will be a lot easier, just fly the plane. In the sim I was in (CE500 series) for engine failures I just stayed outside on the entire takeoff. The second pilot is there for setting the power, monitoring engines and the annunciator panel. All you should worry about is holding centerline and getting the correction in for when the engine fails. The sim will be a bit touchier than what you're used to so remember that the airplane might fly a little differently.

Also, what I did for V1 cuts in the sim which worked really well for me was I got the V1 call, the engine failed and then Vr came. I delayed rotation ever so slightly, got the plane under control about the yaw axis and then rotated. Makes it a lot smoother, and you're able to hold heading within 2-3 degrees (10 in standard I believe). That was all for the CE-500 so YMMV.

Just listen to your instructor, they should have good advice for flying the plane and you'll do fine. Hopefully Tfaudree will pop in and give you some tips, he has quite a bit of time in the plane.

Congrats on the position!

edit: TF beat me to it.
 

PositionAndHold

Well-Known Member
Hawkers are like big 172s.

Don't flare them too much. Hawker pilots LOVE to flare the damn thing, and it never works out like they hope. I've seen guys land it and the nose wheel is like 37 feet in the air. Keep the pitch attitude lower and let ground effect do its thing.
This. And I think it pretty much goes for all jets. They're not supposed to land like a 172. They're firm and very little flair. Sure, if you've got 8-10,000 feet to play with grease it on. Otherwise put it in the touch down zone firmly. I think of more guys in the corp world would stop trying to grease it, there would be a few less over runs. You can still be smooth and firm at the same time, while still keeping your job. It just takes practice. :)

That's also good advice to keep it slow in the sim. Fly at your pace and don't let the instructor or sim partner rush you. You'll speed up in time. Most important of all, have fun, work hard, and enjoy it. You're not going to nail every thing perfect every time. Just do better on the next maneuver and shake the last one off. It'll come with practice.
 

TFaudree_ERAU

Mashin' dem buttons
You're going to press the wrong pedal on your first V1 cut...guarantee. I did it twice. The rudder bias slams the dead engine rudder pedal right at you, so your natural inclination is to put it back in its place. Once you get into the mindset that it's taking care of everything for you, you're winning the game.

Re: landing

Yes


No


GUARANTEE the first one was smoother...regardless of the fact it's a wet runway.
 

SoonerAv8r

Well-Known Member
During the checkride, don't be afraid to ask for vectors to give yourself more time if needed. Also second the speed thing. 170-180 on the tape sets yourself up for success.
 

mikecweb

Third Generation Arizonan
No

Oh wells you win some you lose some. And it sucks when you lose and there is evidence.
 

MikeD

Administrator
Staff member
You're not going to nail every thing perfect every time. Just do better on the next maneuver and shake the last one off. It'll come with practice.
And if it doesn't come with practice, then the OP will simply wash out of the program. That, or you can D.O.R.... Mayo.

 

dasleben

That's just, like, your opinion, man
And if it doesn't come with practice, then the OP will simply wash out of the program. That, or you can D.O.R.... Mayo.

Or if you get a left generator failure at 100 knots in the sim, continue the takeoff, have your right engine start surging, then hand yourself an even bigger emergency when you call for it to be shut down... Well, just handle it and kick yourself in the ass later. :D

(Not that I know this from experience....or something...)
 

MikeOH58

Well-Known Member
Energy. In a couple months when its not ISA +15, try accelerating and then climbing at Vne / Mmo. Its not worth it on hot days, but in the winter I have seen 2,500FPM+ climbing the CJ at redline. Ends up saving .1 hobbs and 100-200 lbs of fuel. Couple hundred bucks right there. Over the course of the winter, tens of thousands in savings. Personal technique only, no where does it say you have to or should practice this.

An AOA indicator may be mew to you? It comes in handy if you forget to bug your landing speeds.

Enjoy, moving into your first jet is a lot of fun.
 

Chief Captain

Well-Known Member
Energy. In a couple months when its not ISA +15, try accelerating and then climbing at Vne / Mmo. Its not worth it on hot days, but in the winter I have seen 2,500FPM+ climbing the CJ at redline. Ends up saving .1 hobbs and 100-200 lbs of fuel.
How does climbing at Vne save fuel?
 
Top