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JC Cyclists.

Discussion in 'Health and Fitness' started by Pilotforhire587, Jun 30, 2011.

  1. NovemberEcho

    NovemberEcho Well-Known Member

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    So id like to get into road biking this year. Can anyone recommend a good road bike in the sub $1k range? Strictly staying on road, I've got a mtb for the fun stuff.
     
  2. BEEF SUPREME

    BEEF SUPREME Well-Known Member

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    I'd buy the cheapest roadie with disk brakes and clearance for 30c tires.

    Not sure if you can find that for under 1k...


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  3. NovemberEcho

    NovemberEcho Well-Known Member

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    What are some good brands you'd recommend and who to stay away from?
     
  4. TUCKnTRUCK

    TUCKnTRUCK That guy

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    CAAD 10 disk on craigslist/eBay.

    If you want full carbon in an aero package, you can find the Kestrel Talon for cheap money- sucks for climbing but it's pretty fast on the flats. [​IMG]
     
  5. BEEF SUPREME

    BEEF SUPREME Well-Known Member

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    You can't go wrong with the big 3: Specialized, Trek, Giant.

    I'm looking for much different things. So I'm not sure if my advice is sound.

    I'm looking for specific things like geometry, component spec etc. and willing to spend more.


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  6. NovemberEcho

    NovemberEcho Well-Known Member

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    I don't know what TO look for other than I don't want to drop a ton of money only to wind up not using it much. Although I hope that doesn't happen lol
     
  7. Roger Roger

    Roger Roger Navajo Whisperer

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    Suck it up and go to your local bike shop. A bike is one of those things that it's worth paying a little extra to have a pro advise you.
     
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  8. NovemberEcho

    NovemberEcho Well-Known Member

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    Oh I'll def be buying from a local bike shop, but I don't like to have all my information or recommendations come from the person selling me the item.
     
  9. bike21

    bike21 Somewhat Known Member

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  10. FlyingSieve

    FlyingSieve Well-Known Member

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    At a *good* LBS, the employees are far better cycling enthusiasts than salespeople. I've purchased two new road bikes in the past year (one sub-$1000, the other a custom build .... far from sub-$1000).

    The guy I buy from would be awful at a car dealership, electronics store, etc. He rides thousands of miles per year and doesn't do the upsell thing (not being paid on commission matters).

    The trick is finding a shop like that...
     
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  11. NovemberEcho

    NovemberEcho Well-Known Member

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    I need to find a good bike shop. The one in my town has 2 star rating and I used them once for a repair on my mtb that didn't go so well.
     
  12. BEEF SUPREME

    BEEF SUPREME Well-Known Member

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    This is pretty crucial


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  13. bike21

    bike21 Somewhat Known Member

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    I was that guy, terrible at sales but could talk bikes all day.
     
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  14. Mach82

    Mach82 Professional Tree Killer

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    Want to pick the seasoned bike vets brain on here about some road bikes. Like NovemberEcho, I too have decided to jump into the bike market. After reading this forum from the beginning to get a sense of where to begin, I concluded that the minimum entry point for road bikes should be between $1,000-$1,500. Armed with this knowledge, I stopped by a couple of the local bike shops to see what they would recommend for a 6' 2" 275lb guy. I test rode a 2017 Giant Defy Advanced 3 https://www.giant-bicycles.com/us/defy-advanced-3 and have set up a test ride on Wednesday for the Trek Domane ALR 4 https://www.trekbikes.com/us/en_US/...omane/domane-alr/domane-alr-4/p/1404000-2017/ . Assuming that all goes will with that test ride (not like a noob is going to notice a difference), which one would you choose? From what I can tell, both have the same component setup (Shimano Tiagra). The major difference that I can tell is that Giant is an all composite frame vs the aluminum frame of Trek. Thanks for the insight.
     
  15. n156499000

    n156499000 Titanius Anglesmith

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    If you live somewhere where it rains a lot and you plan on going out on less than sunny days, I'd personally lean toward the Giant because it's got disc brakes which will perform better in adverse conditions. If you are only gonna go out on sunny days (or like somewhere like Phoenix like I do where riding in rain is a rarity, rim brakes are just fine). Otherwise it's simply a matter of which one you feel most comfortable on and if that's the same, pick your favorite color. At that level other than differences in manufacturer sizing and reach, you aren't going to see much noticeable difference between them. The beauty of the bike though is that as time goes by you can replace the low grade components and tweak the fit by swapping the components and resizing as necessary. I've got a 14 year old Trek that was in that same price range which is currently on it's third full set of components, with plenty of individual parts in between. It's got probably 70,000 miles on it and other than needing a paint job at this point probably rides better now than when I bought it because I've gone from dirt cheap to "oooooh, shiny" components as time went by and my income became more disposable.

    Biggest advice I'd give you though is on the wheels. I'm 6'6" and have been between 230 and 250 lbs the last decade or so and can tell you that standard 20/24 spoke wheels are not going to last you very long. Most wheels are designed around a 190-200 lb rider weight limit and unless the roads you are riding on are smoother than butter, you are going to need a beefier wheel unless you want to be constantly getting your wheel's trued (or worse replacing them because you cracked them). Ask the shop if they carry wheels with a higher spoke count. If they do usually they will swap them out for the stock wheels usually giving a small discount credit on the stock wheels towards the purchase of the new wheels. It's gonna add a couple hundred bucks upfront but will save you time later as at 275 lbs you are gonna tear up the normal stock wheels pretty quick. If they don't carry any, check out: http://www.williamscycling.com/Wheel-System-31-2832-spoke-count_p_9.html

    You aren't gonna find much in the way of wheels designed for heavier riders, I've never found a good set of carbon wheels designed for anyone over 200 lbs, but you are going to spend less time getting the wheels repaired and will have a more comfortable and enjoyable ride if you get wheels with a higher spoke count or that are designed around heavier riders.
     
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  16. Itchy

    Itchy Well-Known Member

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    https://www.radpowerbikes.com/products/radrover-electric-fat-bike?variant=1121017969

    Use all the boost you want, as you get in better shape, you back it off.
     
  17. Kahiona42

    Kahiona42 Well-Known Member

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    I'm a big guy 240 and I've been road and track racing since the early 90's. All my race bikes have been aluminum with the most recent being a 2010 BMC.

    I look for a lot of meat at the bottom bracket area, a fat downtube that looks like it's about to swallow the bottom bracket. Big guys who really mash the gears need the stiffness that comes with that. I have had lesser bikes that were so thin in that area that the joint would fatigue to a point where if you were to stand and sprint you would throw the chain off the chainrings which can send you over the bars.

    At your price point to you can get a higher guality in an aluminum frame than you can carbon fiber. Smaller guys will say that aluminum provides a stiff/harsh ride but when you weigh over 2 bills your extra poundage mated to that stiff aluminum make a perfect pair. That said my next bike will be a splurge. I'm going to spend $4000+ for my first carbon fiber framed bike a Scott Foil. It comes with the super stiffness that I need at a higher price than comparable aluminum but with the added benefit of being very light. Not a big deal at my girth, it's cheaper and easier to drop pounds off my body than my bike but it should be a fun ride.

    Heed the words from n156499000 about wheels. When your a big dude you need more spokes. Ultralight is fun but you'll taco those things soon after you hit the road. I use a pair of Williams Cycling, Wheel System 31, 28/32 spoke wheels. $589 a pair. When you do start upgrading components wheels should be first. They will make the biggest difference. It can make a good bike great or a great bike sublime.

    Also get the brightest red blinky taillight you can find. Whether I'm riding solo in the middle of the night or in a group of 20 at midday it's always on. Anything that might help divert drivers eyes from their phones to me gives me a better chance of not getting whacked by a car.

    Good luck!

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  18. BEEF SUPREME

    BEEF SUPREME Well-Known Member

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    Pretty good write ups. Also remember that with disk brakes maintenance is a bit more involved and pads don't last as long as rim brake pads did. As long as they are ridden in the dry of course


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  19. Kahiona42

    Kahiona42 Well-Known Member

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    Agreed! Personally not a fan of discs. Not in a retro-grouch sort of way but because of the added maintenance, also I've never needed more braking than my rim brakes can provide. Ok, maybe I am a bit of a retro-grouch.

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  20. Mach82

    Mach82 Professional Tree Killer

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    Memphis certainly has it's fair share of both, so I suppose it's a wash either way. If the sudden summer pop up CB happens, then it'll be what it is. The ability to upgrade components at a later date is definitely a nice feature that I will look into as I get more experience.

    The saleslady at the Trek store was talking about this because I am on the upper limit at this point in time. She mentioned that if I bought the Domane to also get a set of 32 spoke tires and they would credit me the stock tires. Said it would be ~$55/tire. That's much less than I was expecting. Still not that bad though.

    Interesting point! Definitely something I did not think of but makes sense.

    I was talking with my cousin's husband, who works in an outdoor store in the BNA area, and they both mentioned that both bikes are comparable. He mentioned that according to "peloton" the Trek was favored more. It seems logical to get the higher quality aluminum frame and upgrade at a later date.
    I definitely plan on doing that with the driving skills around these parts. I thought Mass. & Miami folks were terrific drivers:rolleyes: :eek:

    Thanks for the info! Very much appreciated. Do you think a platform pedal is the way to start out? I'm thinking so, until I really get out there. The other problem I think that I'll run into and will use the old google machine to research is finding 4E wide shoes if I decide to go clipless.:bang: First things first.....the bike :D
     

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