It's time to get off the pot...(and I mean the one in the men's room, not the kind you burn...)

AVWXinNH

DFW DXer
It's been a while since I posted anything, but I read these forums every day. I earned my ADX license a little over two years ago, and due to family situations, had to accept a 135 flight following gig near home for a seasonal position that could have turned into full time, but didn't. The time I spent there was probably the most professional satisfaction I've ever had in my life. But due to said family obligations, when the seasonal gig ended, I had to get a job - anywhere. So I accepted a position in a "career" I cringe at, but, since it pays upwards of six figures, it enabled me to relocate, support my obligations to my broken family, and start over. Now almost two years later, I'm ready to go for it. It will likely mean moving from my new home, and will definitely mean a 60+% cut in pay. But I need to feel useful, satisfied, and yes, maybe even happy. At my age, I'm running out of time to make a new career work (I'm 53). I've dedicated myself to studying everything I've forgotten over the past two years, and have started applying to my top 10 list of potential employers. Just like walking in to ADX class the first day, realizing everything I need to sharpen up on, it's overwhelming. So, my question for all you experienced, or recent hires is, what should I focus my energies on mastering first, and what else should I prepare for for a potential interview? My gut tells me some of the basics like the 1-2-3 rule, when you need an alternate, etc, regulations (which Parts are most important to master?) and finally, master AD's, IAP, STARs, and high and low enroute charts. Am I on the right track in your opinion, or am I missing something? Advice, suggestions, and if you believe, a prayer or two would be appreciated. Thank you, y'all are wonderful.
 

Mainline_or_bust

Two days before, the day after tomorrow
Hey good for you! First advice I would give anyone who is looking to get into the industry (part 121) is be willing to move for better pay, experience etc. Starting at a regional is hit or miss it seems, as in some people stay until a mainline and others move from their first to cargo or another regional before their dream job. I would just suggest that you be open about it after a year. No reason to take a 60% pay cut for your time building experience, I gained a 37% wage increase overnight by moving companies. Just don't tie yourself down with a year long lease as mine happened after 9 months and I had to deal with that.

As far as what to study, I think you're going to need to get back to the point of 90% on ADX test preps. Get your hands on a release and go over the information on it to the point of being able to explain it, that should help. Know SIDs, STARs and IAPs, as far as their sections and symbols, obviously weather. You'll have rust for sure but if you work at it there's a regional out there who will hire you and train you to get the rust off. Work hard, and feel free to PM me or post on here if you have questions. I don't know everything and neither does everyone on the forum, but I bet you someone knows the answer regardless of the question, DRM.
 

TaxiBack

Plane planes planes
[QUOTE..... but I bet you someone knows the answer regardless of the question, DRM.[/QUOTE]

You rrang Sir....?

The answer is 74-green-88 Omaha...hut hut....
 

Mainline_or_bust

Two days before, the day after tomorrow
[QUOTE..... but I bet you someone knows the answer regardless of the question, DRM.
You rrang Sir....?

The answer is 74-green-88 Omaha...hut hut....[/QUOTE]

Settle down there John Elway. On a side note... You're still dispatching? Thought they would have pulled you license by now o_O
 
F

Flying Saluki

Guest
It's been a while since I posted anything, but I read these forums every day. I earned my ADX license a little over two years ago, and due to family situations, had to accept a 135 flight following gig near home for a seasonal position that could have turned into full time, but didn't. The time I spent there was probably the most professional satisfaction I've ever had in my life. But due to said family obligations, when the seasonal gig ended, I had to get a job - anywhere. So I accepted a position in a "career" I cringe at, but, since it pays upwards of six figures, it enabled me to relocate, support my obligations to my broken family, and start over. Now almost two years later, I'm ready to go for it. It will likely mean moving from my new home, and will definitely mean a 60+% cut in pay. But I need to feel useful, satisfied, and yes, maybe even happy. At my age, I'm running out of time to make a new career work (I'm 53). I've dedicated myself to studying everything I've forgotten over the past two years, and have started applying to my top 10 list of potential employers. Just like walking in to ADX class the first day, realizing everything I need to sharpen up on, it's overwhelming. So, my question for all you experienced, or recent hires is, what should I focus my energies on mastering first, and what else should I prepare for for a potential interview? My gut tells me some of the basics like the 1-2-3 rule, when you need an alternate, etc, regulations (which Parts are most important to master?) and finally, master AD's, IAP, STARs, and high and low enroute charts. Am I on the right track in your opinion, or am I missing something? Advice, suggestions, and if you believe, a prayer or two would be appreciated. Thank you, y'all are wonderful.
You don't need to "master" it. You weren't a master of it when you got your license, and no Part 121 regional gig will expect it. Just make sure you understand the basics.

Start with the regulations. They are the foundation on which everything else is built. Regulations drive why we do what we do, so start there.
Focus on Part 1, 91, 117, 121. I recommend making flash cards with the regulatory reference on one side, and the requirements of the reg. on the other.

Text Weather and NOTAMS: There are any number of YouTube videos dedicated to this subject. Start there for review. Download the latest version of AC 00-6A Aviation Weather for Pilots and Flight Operations Personnel as resource.

Airspace and Navigation. Airman's Information Manual always a good resource, and there are YouTube videos available for that as well.

Meteorology: Probably going to be the single biggest portion to review.

Chart Review. Acquire some enroute, terminal, and approach plate charts and start by naming what you remember. Use the legend to look up what you don't remember.

Anybody else?
 

bushpilot87

Well-Known Member
You don't need to "master" it. You weren't a master of it when you got your license, and no Part 121 regional gig will expect it. Just make sure you understand the basics.

Start with the regulations. They are the foundation on which everything else is built. Regulations drive why we do what we do, so start there.
Focus on Part 1, 91, 117, 121. I recommend making flash cards with the regulatory reference on one side, and the requirements of the reg. on the other.

Text Weather and NOTAMS: There are any number of YouTube videos dedicated to this subject. Start there for review. Download the latest version of AC 00-6A Aviation Weather for Pilots and Flight Operations Personnel as resource.

Airspace and Navigation. Airman's Information Manual always a good resource, and there are YouTube videos available for that as well.

Meteorology: Probably going to be the single biggest portion to review.

Chart Review. Acquire some enroute, terminal, and approach plate charts and start by naming what you remember. Use the legend to look up what you don't remember.

Anybody else?
Why don't you just go ahead and give him the interview gouge to all the regionals... haven't you worked at almost all of them?
 

manniax

Well-met in the Ka-tet
Why don't you just go ahead and give him the interview gouge to all the regionals... haven't you worked at almost all of them?
You know, I ended up working at three different regionals (and one startup national carrier) before I made it to the majors. I do know one thing - having a negative attitude and always putting other people down does not help your career prospects in ANY field, including dispatching.
 

bushpilot87

Well-Known Member
You know, I ended up working at three different regionals (and one startup national carrier) before I made it to the majors. I do know one thing - having a negative attitude and always putting other people down does not help your career prospects in ANY field, including dispatching.
It also wasn't putting anyone down... some of y'all always want to turn everything negative. It could be of great help to some people to prepare for these interviews...rather than offering up generic tidbits.
 

womanpilot73

Well-Known Member
AVWXinNH said:
It's been a while since I posted anything, but I read these forums every day. I earned my ADX license a little over two years ago, and due to family situations, had to accept a 135 flight following gig near home for a seasonal position that could have turned into full time, but didn't. The time I spent there was probably the most professional satisfaction I've ever had in my life. But due to said family obligations, when the seasonal gig ended, I had to get a job - anywhere. So I accepted a position in a "career" I cringe at, but, since it pays upwards of six figures, it enabled me to relocate, support my obligations to my broken family, and start over. Now almost two years later, I'm ready to go for it. It will likely mean moving from my new home, and will definitely mean a 60+% cut in pay. But I need to feel useful, satisfied, and yes, maybe even happy. At my age, I'm running out of time to make a new career work (I'm 53). I've dedicated myself to studying everything I've forgotten over the past two years, and have started applying to my top 10 list of potential employers. Just like walking in to ADX class the first day, realizing everything I need to sharpen up on, it's overwhelming. So, my question for all you experienced, or recent hires is, what should I focus my energies on mastering first, and what else should I prepare for for a potential interview? My gut tells me some of the basics like the 1-2-3 rule, when you need an alternate, etc, regulations (which Parts are most important to master?) and finally, master AD's, IAP, STARs, and high and low enroute charts. Am I on the right track in your opinion, or am I missing something? Advice, suggestions, and if you believe, a prayer or two would be appreciated. Thank you, y'all are wonderful.
So I'm not sure where you got your license, but many schools allow you to sit through the course again at no charge. Also, some have online courses now and as a former student, would be willing to hook you up with a username and password so that you can review online.

In addition to what people have recommended, I found the ASA Aircraft Dispatcher Oral Exam Guide awesome for reviewing all areas of the basics, as well as a great source for interview/test prep.

You can also get the Quizlet app which has tons of flashcards already created by others on info from aviation wx, part 121 regulations, ADX test prep, etc... Just search and voila!

Absolutely review the regs - Part 121 Subpart U. As someone else mentioned, there is a plethora of YouTube videos on wx theory and aviation wx that you can watch. Same for breaking down enroute and approach charts, SIDS/STARS and so forth. Jeppesen also has a PDF online that breaks down every chart there is, with all the symbols and meanings.

Congrats on going after something that you enjoy! Many don't have the courage, especially later in life. Good luck to you!
 

Socks and sandals

Well-Known Member
It's been a while since I posted anything, but I read these forums every day. I earned my ADX license a little over two years ago, and due to family situations, had to accept a 135 flight following gig near home for a seasonal position that could have turned into full time, but didn't. The time I spent there was probably the most professional satisfaction I've ever had in my life. But due to said family obligations, when the seasonal gig ended, I had to get a job - anywhere. So I accepted a position in a "career" I cringe at, but, since it pays upwards of six figures, it enabled me to relocate, support my obligations to my broken family, and start over. Now almost two years later, I'm ready to go for it. It will likely mean moving from my new home, and will definitely mean a 60+% cut in pay. But I need to feel useful, satisfied, and yes, maybe even happy. At my age, I'm running out of time to make a new career work (I'm 53). I've dedicated myself to studying everything I've forgotten over the past two years, and have started applying to my top 10 list of potential employers. Just like walking in to ADX class the first day, realizing everything I need to sharpen up on, it's overwhelming. So, my question for all you experienced, or recent hires is, what should I focus my energies on mastering first, and what else should I prepare for for a potential interview? My gut tells me some of the basics like the 1-2-3 rule, when you need an alternate, etc, regulations (which Parts are most important to master?) and finally, master AD's, IAP, STARs, and high and low enroute charts. Am I on the right track in your opinion, or am I missing something? Advice, suggestions, and if you believe, a prayer or two would be appreciated. Thank you, y'all are wonderful.
Honestly, why not just retire, then get back in for the flight benefits?
 

AVWXinNH

DFW DXer
Hey thanks everyone for the suggestions. Seems like I'm pretty much on the glide slope to what I need to do, just need to do it. I do want to master the basics; my reasoning is at my age (experienced, not broken down!!) I need to do better than kids half my age, so I'm delving in a little deeper than maybe I need to - for example, on the Airport Diagrams, I wanted to make sure I could answer what all the nice little runway codes at the bottom of the chart are - i.e. the PCN codes. I'm not too worried about reading, interpreting and even short term forecasting the weather stuff. I give myself a preflight weather briefing every morning at work before I start the "fun" stuff (shhhh, don't tell anyone....) The regs will be big too, so I'll be spending a lot of time on those.
Thanks again everyone for your help and guidance. I can do this.... :)
Hopefully in a few months I can report that I've made the jump!!!
 

CS0290

Well-Known Member
Hey thanks everyone for the suggestions. Seems like I'm pretty much on the glide slope to what I need to do, just need to do it. I do want to master the basics; my reasoning is at my age (experienced, not broken down!!) I need to do better than kids half my age, so I'm delving in a little deeper than maybe I need to - for example, on the Airport Diagrams, I wanted to make sure I could answer what all the nice little runway codes at the bottom of the chart are - i.e. the PCN codes. I'm not too worried about reading, interpreting and even short term forecasting the weather stuff. I give myself a preflight weather briefing every morning at work before I start the "fun" stuff (shhhh, don't tell anyone....) The regs will be big too, so I'll be spending a lot of time on those.
Thanks again everyone for your help and guidance. I can do this.... :)
Hopefully in a few months I can report that I've made the jump!!!
Good luck!


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