Ipad as a teaching aid

gator4798

Well-Known Member
Hey folks, I'm working on my CFI at the moment and am wondering about peoples opinions about using the ipad as an instructional aid both for ground sessions and in the air. Do you use one?Like it, Love it, Hate it with a passion?? Do you not use one and never would? Why? I've worked with a CFI who used one and I personally like it as a student. If you have one did you go with the 3G version or just WiFi? Which do you prefer. Thanks alot for the suggestions!
 

p1l07m4n

SF340 Pirate, First Mate
I have one, and use it on a regular basis. It is great for carrying around all of the FAA Publications on one small device (for free). The biggest things I use it for are the calendar, and the occasional youtube video to back up whatever I am teaching. I just went with the WiFi version (cheaper, and our hangars have wireless internet), and just bought a GPS receiver from Sporty's to use on cross country flights. All in all, I would say it's been a good investment (especially Tiger Woods PGA 2012 when a student doesn't show up for your time slot). Let me know if you have any questions about descent apps for it.
 

scott_l

Well-Known Member
Get the app CloudAhoy and it will map your entire flight on google earth, show your number of takeoff and landings, how long ground time was, and a ton more...the ipad (or iphone) is worth it just for that.
 

rframe

pǝʇɹǝʌuı
I've become a HUGE fan of my tablet as a flight instructor. It keeps me organized and has almost eliminated my need for a flight bag (still need to carry a few small things) without feeling like I'm leaving anything behind.

I use a 10" Android tablet, but I am finding it very useful on the ground and in the cockpit. Here are the things I'm doing with it. I'm sure all the equivalent functions are available on iPad.

I use an EFB app (Avilution AviationMaps). Of course this works as a navigational aid, but much more so as a training tool. By holding it up in the cockpit I can pinch zoom and show areas of the sectional chart they need to know, remind them where to find frequencies, help them make the connection between what they see outside and what is on the sectional chart for teaching pilotage. I use this on every flight to teach some application of using the charts.

I require my students to show up with a print-off of the METAR/TAF, Notams, and TFR map for each lesson. The first time I teach them to do this I just pull up the web sites on the tablet (it's 4GLTE so I do this on the ramp) and show them how to retrieve this information.

I've created a weight and balance spreadsheet with the envelopes and put it on my web site. I teach the students how to check weight and balance interactively on the tab and then they have the same tool available at home. Feel free to steal a copy and modify: http://www.highcountryair.com/page/weight-and-balance-calculations

I have all the FAA handbooks and PTS in PDF so I quickly pull those up to show graphics of what a particular maneuver looks like, to help them visualize what I'm explaining. I really wish there was a PDF of ASA's Visualized Flight Maneuvers Handbooks, as I think they are great, I still keep a paper copy in my bag but might just end up scanning it and creating my own PDF for tablet use.

I've got copies of many different POH's in PDF, so I can also quickly pull those up to explain performance graphs and operating procedures.

I have downloaded the relevant regs from http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2004-title14-vol1/content-detail.html and have these split up by major parts. Then I've notated the regs with bookmarks, highlighting/underlining, and notes in my PDF app.... so I can pull these up quickly and explain why we must do certain things.

I record almost all of my flights in Google Tracks, upload the tracks to Google Maps, and send the student a link to help illustrate what was right/wrong about a flight (particularly useful when doing ground reference maneuvers and traffic patterns).

Square/Paypal/whatever-payment-solutions-you-like are essential to getting paid and making book-keeping simple (if you're independent/self-employed).

I use a note taking app (FreeNote on Android) to jot down ATIS and miscellaneous notes in flight, and to sketch illustrations if needed to help visualize something I'm teaching.

I use Excel to keep training records for each student, one row for each flight, so I have a solid record of what we have covered.

I have student checklists in Excel for things like pre-solo requirements, so I can check those off as they are learned and as they demonstrate proficiency and show those to the students as we go so they can visualize their own progress, which helps keep them motivated.

For in-flight reference I put my lesson plan either in Excel or in my FreeNote application so I can be sure to follow the plan and not forget any important details.

I keep my student documents sync'd to the cloud with SugarSync, so I can review those on my PC and know I have a backup if the tablet blows up.

I keep my schedule sync'd on my tablet with Google Calendar so I can easily schedule additional lessons right from the ramp and not run into personal conflicts.

I find the 3G/4G Verizon month-to-month 1GB service indispensable. I can grab weather/nexrad, file flightplans, check email, process credit card payments, etc etc etc from the plane and ramp. I would feel very limited with just wifi at this point, and the $20/month for service is easy to swallow. I use a small fraction of the 1GB plan.
 

gator4798

Well-Known Member
How much storage space does your tablet have and how much do you think you've used on the aviation apps? I'm thinking im sold and now I'm just trying to narrow down how many organs I have to sell. And thanks alot for all the other input as well. You all have been a great help!
 

rframe

pǝʇɹǝʌuı
I have a 32GB tablet, I'm currently using about 3GB.
I've got about 1GB used up in Application installs and App data.
Northwest USA sectionals, TACs, Low/High en-route, approach plates, AFD's, airport guides
About 1GB of saved documents, pdf's, videos.

If you only fly in a few local states, 8GB might work if you're really on a budget, but I would recommend 16GB minimum and 32GB ideally. I know Foreflight recommends 16GB minimum.

Obviously you can burn up a lot of space if you save off-line copies of videos and such.
 

gator4798

Well-Known Member
Well I just shelled out a chunk of my hard earned cash for a refurbished 32gb ipad 2 with 3g. I cant wait to get it and try it out. Thanks for all the input guys!
 

jskibo

Done
If you only fly in a few local states, 8GB might work if you're really on a budget, but I would recommend 16GB minimum and 32GB ideally. I know Foreflight recommends 16GB minimum.

Obviously you can burn up a lot of space if you save off-line copies of videos and such.
Never made an 8GB iPad. 16 is the smallest

I use mine for foreflight. 16GB wifi with the dual Bluetooth gps. Thinking of getting that new weather / gps combo from sportys, price just hurts though.

Look around, when I bought my 16GB from eBay I paid $285, a week later I bought the wife's 64GB 3G for $305. It was advertised as having a dent at the top back. Funny, didn't see anything when it arrived.
 

African_Swallow

Well-Known Member
FYI -- ForeFlight also has a tab called "Documents" which has all of the chart legends, intros, etc. AND the FAA publications (Airplane Flying Handbook, etc.)

-A.S>
 

gator4798

Well-Known Member
Yea, So my ipad came, So far I've loaded:
ForeFlight (It is amazing!!!)
Sportys E6B (Useful)
AeroWeather (Meh, foreflight does all the same stuff, just better)
FltPlan.com (very nice)
Aviation W&B (Very nice)

I've yet to go flying with it but so far I am very impressed. Oh and I'm glad I went refrurbished. No dents or scratches. 1 year warrenty, perfect condition. Thanks for all the advice guys!!
 

jskibo

Done
Just a note, I tried using it on my lap, looking down was a pain. Found the RAM yoke mount works nice, pretty cheap off ebay as compared to Sportys or elsewhere.
 
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