International Jumpseat?

BobDDuck

Island Bus Driver
#2
No. Especially not into it out of the US. Inter Europe or Asia it could happen but not normally.

You actually can't even ride the jumpseat of a US carrier internationally, unless it's your own. The TSA allows it now, but no carrier has implemented it yet.
 

ctab5060X

Well-Known Member
#3
No. Especially not into it out of the US. Inter Europe or Asia it could happen but not normally.

You actually can't even ride the jumpseat of a US carrier internationally, unless it's your own. The TSA allows it now, but no carrier has implemented it yet.
We can ride our flighdeck jumpseat internationally...
 
#6
We still can't jumpseat OAL internationally due to US Customs issues as it relates to the master crew list. Not all airlines have them. If the paper work is not filed correctly with customs and they cannot properly verify the MCL, the plane will be denied entry into US airspace. No airline is going to risk that to help out an OAL.

I don't see the limitation changing for awhile longer. I don't believe anyone is throwing money at it to solve it.


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Zondaracer

Well-Known Member
#8
Some foreign carriers will allow you to ride in the Jumpseat. In and out of the U.K., not at all since the U.K. has their own laws regarding this. I know Vueling specifically requires a letter from the company authorizing this, so if you don't know anyone at Vueling, then no chance. Air Berlin it is up to the captain. I know of people purchasing a ZED fare on Air France and Icelandic and being allowed to ride in the flight attendant Jumpseat.

When I lived in Europe, many of my friends would purchase fares on companies such as Air Berlin and would ask the flight attendant if they could talk to the captain about riding in the Jumpseat after showing their commercial pilot license. It was always up to the captain and many times they were allowed to ride up front.

Basically, I wouldn't count on it, but policies vary by company and by country.
 
#9
It was my understanding just after 9/11 you could jumpseat internationally on a foreign carrier with your Airman's Certificate and passport. Due to being recently medically retired, I am obviously not in CASS. I am not yet 65 so I can't non-rev (I am vested with UAL). However, the world has changed since then. I never verified if that was true. Anyone know if was ever true and if so, is it still true? Any and all (compassionate) answers welcome. Thanks.
 
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v1valarob

Well-Known Member
#11
You can now sit in the flight attendant jumpseat on British Airways when flying inside of Europe. Its apparently a very new thing.

I was trying to zed fare from London to Glasgow a few weeks ago. First flight was full. Second flight the gate agent issued me a seat and said "you're in the jumpseat." I had no clue what this meant, but I wasn't going to question it. I boarded up and the purser looked at my ticket and sent me to the back of the airbus. I introduced myself to the crew in the back of the aircraft, and the FA gave me a quick run down of how to operate everything. Off we went! Apparently on this particular airbus there are 5 FA jumpseats but only 3 FAs are required. If BA sells more higher priority seats then they will crew the aircraft with more FAs. This particular flight did not need them, so 2 seats were now available to traveling staff members.

I know this isnt quite what OP is looking for, but figured Id share my experience in case anyone is traveling throughout Europe.
 

BobDDuck

Island Bus Driver
#12
It was my understanding just after 9/11 you could jumpseat internationally on a foreign carrier with your Airman's Certificate and passport. Due to being recently medically retired, I am obviously not in CASS. I am not yet 65 so I can't non-rev (I am vested with UAL). However, the world has changed since then. I never verified if that was true. Anyone know if was ever true and if so, is it still true? Any and all (compassionate) answers welcome. Thanks.
This was not true post 9-11 for any flights in to or out of the US. It still remains true, although it is possible to jumpseat in a cabin seat on some international airlines if you are an active duty pilot at a US carrier that has an agreement with another carrier. If you are retired (medically or otherwise) you have no jumpseat rights on any airline, including the one you worked for. You may have non rev privileges and access to ZED fares, but that will vary depending on your airline and work group specific contracts.

You can now sit in the flight attendant jumpseat on British Airways when flying inside of Europe. Its apparently a very new thing.

I was trying to zed fare from London to Glasgow a few weeks ago. First flight was full. Second flight the gate agent issued me a seat and said "you're in the jumpseat." I had no clue what this meant, but I wasn't going to question it. I boarded up and the purser looked at my ticket and sent me to the back of the airbus. I introduced myself to the crew in the back of the aircraft, and the FA gave me a quick run down of how to operate everything. Off we went! Apparently on this particular airbus there are 5 FA jumpseats but only 3 FAs are required. If BA sells more higher priority seats then they will crew the aircraft with more FAs. This particular flight did not need them, so 2 seats were now available to traveling staff members.
It's still up to the captain. I was trying to get out of Bucharest back to the US a few months ago and managed to get on a BA flight to LHR. They put me in the aft jumpseat (along with a Thomas Cook FA who was trying to get to work). She said it is hit or miss whether the captain will let you sit there or not. The cabin crew was fine with it, although the aft galley was pretty crowded with 4 of us sitting back there.
 
#14
This was not true post 9-11 for any flights in to or out of the US. It still remains true, although it is possible to jumpseat in a cabin seat on some international airlines if you are an active duty pilot at a US carrier that has an agreement with another carrier. If you are retired (medically or otherwise) you have no jumpseat rights on any airline, including the one you worked for. You may have non rev privileges and access to ZED fares, but that will vary depending on your airline and work group specific contracts.



It's still up to the captain. I was trying to get out of Bucharest back to the US a few months ago and managed to get on a BA flight to LHR. They put me in the aft jumpseat (along with a Thomas Cook FA who was trying to get to work). She said it is hit or miss whether the captain will let you sit there or not. The cabin crew was fine with it, although the aft galley was pretty crowded with 4 of us sitting back there.
 
#16
10 yrs ago I had one 9E pilot claim he got to physically sit in the jumpseat of an Air France from CDG to ATL, as in the flight deck. I don't know why he would lie about something like this, so maybe it's true or maybe not?
 

jtrain609

I'm a carnal, organic anagram.
#18
10 yrs ago I had one 9E pilot claim he got to physically sit in the jumpseat of an Air France from CDG to ATL, as in the flight deck. I don't know why he would lie about something like this, so maybe it's true or maybe not?
I'd quit my job before I sat in a jumpseat from CDG to ATL.
 
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