Interesting storm in Nebraska

A1TAPE

Well-Known Member
#1
KMCK 070510Z AUTO 33027G48KT 1 3/4SM +TSRA BR SCT047 BKN065 OVC080 18/16 A2996 RMK AO2 PK WND 34048/0502 LTG DSNT ALQDS RAB0459 P0011 T01830161 $
 

JustinS

Well-Known Member
#4
My favorite is when the TAF says VRB25G50 +TSRAGR. It's like "We have no idea. You probably just shouldn't fly here during this time frame."
 

jynxyjoe

The Kickin' Chicken!
#5
KMCK 070510Z AUTO 33027G48KT 1 3/4SM +TSRA BR SCT047 BKN065 OVC080 18/16 A2996 RMK AO2 PK WND 34048/0502 LTG DSNT ALQDS RAB0459 P0011 T01830161 $
I see what you're saying with the high cielings, are you an eastern coast guy?
Believe me, this is typical for Nebraska TS, NE and KS are the home of scud running because the scud is at 2.5k :). As a Nebraskan, I'm surprised the winds arent higher.
 

Yakob

Grand Prognosticator Nominee
#8
Also what does ALQDS mean? Never seen that before in a METAR.
ALQDS= All Quadrants. As opposed to just in a specific direction, i.e. LTG DSNT SE.

Yea im used to the OVC 012 or 005
It's actually not too unusual to see a thunderstorm with relatively high ceilings or clouds. It's probably more common in dry climates, but here in the northeast there have been a few thunderstorms recently with ceilings around 3000 or so (although it may have been lower at the exact location of the storm as most of them were scattered, individual cells. Later in the summer look at METARs in the Southwest, once their monsoon season starts, and there will likely be thunderstorms with even higher clouds.
 

CFI A&P

Exploring the world one toilet at a time.
#15
KMCK 070510Z AUTO 33027G48KT 1 3/4SM +TSRA BR SCT047 BKN065 OVC080 18/16 A2996 RMK AO2 PK WND 34048/0502 LTG DSNT ALQDS RAB0459 P0011 T01830161 $
This is from a different location, but the motivational phrase still applies.




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#16
I see what you're saying with the high cielings, are you an eastern coast guy?
Believe me, this is typical for Nebraska TS, NE and KS are the home of scud running because the scud is at 2.5k :). As a Nebraskan, I'm surprised the winds arent higher.
I laughed at a dude in Kansas or Nebraska... can't remember where. He was talking about how hard the flying in the Midwest was. "People from Alaska respect this type of flying." He was telling his young copilot ( in a King Air 90 no less).

I couldn't hold my tongue any longer, "no they don't" I rudely interrupted.
I didn't make a friend that day. Oh well....
 

ASpilot2be

Qbicle seat warmer
#17
I laughed at a dude in Kansas or Nebraska... can't remember where. He was talking about how hard the flying in the Midwest was. "People from Alaska respect this type of flying." He was telling his young copilot ( in a King Air 90 no less).

I couldn't hold my tongue any longer, "no they don't" I rudely interrupted.
I didn't make a friend that day. Oh well....
I freaking hate thunderstorms. I will happily take flying in Alaska over flying in the midwest.
 

jynxyjoe

The Kickin' Chicken!
#20
I laughed at a dude in Kansas or Nebraska... can't remember where. He was talking about how hard the flying in the Midwest was. "People from Alaska respect this type of flying." He was telling his young copilot ( in a King Air 90 no less).

I couldn't hold my tongue any longer, "no they don't" I rudely interrupted.
I didn't make a friend that day. Oh well....
My experience with the Nebraska native pilots are they can't wait to tell you how good their life is, how they never have to commute and how stupid and crazy it is more than 100,000 guys fly out for them big corporate jobs (they mean airlines). I have various replies, none of them work well.

I think there's an arguement that east coast and alaska guys could download some of their experiences with hail and tornadoes and hooks, but i doubt we'd use the information more than once every other year. Otherwise, the sandhills and the plain state ain't got that much challenge compared to a hard ifr day in ny or alaska nonsense. @Roger Roger yes I said it. It's nonsense. Someone had to.
 
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