Instructor Pool & Price increases

pscraig

Well-Known Member
I've been in frequent communication with FSI marketing over the last few days. Angela has been particularly helpful, and has provided me with two valuable pieces of information that might be useful:

1. There will be no price increases in January as in previous years.

2. The instructor pool currently sits at 54. They estimate this equals a 6-8 month wait at current student enrollment and regional hiring rates.
 

aviator

New Member
My guess as to the formula.......

8 IP's per stand class. 54 on list /8 = 6.75 stand classes

1 stand class every 6 weeks. 6.75 * 6 weeks = 40.5 weeks

40.5 weeks = 10 months (aprox)

Figure 25% no show factor (has really been higher) and you end up with about 7.25 month wait (almost between 6-8!)

I just came up with this now on my own and yes I have too much time on my hands!
 

chunk75

Well-Known Member
We'll see....

There is an info meeting coming up, I hear....

Probably look for a sign up sheet soon, if it's now out already...

Chunk
 

pscraig

Well-Known Member
Please keep us posted. Although I am not personally interested in the ASA program (at this point anyway) I'd love to see some instructor movement.
 

fsiflyer

Well-Known Member
Hello All,
Well it was great to be back on campus on the 9th...also great meeting you chunk. I was wondering if I would and I sorta just bumped into you...good thing I was wearing my good ole US Marine tie tack. Anyhow, the ASA interviews will be on the 15th and 16th with 10 people total interviewing. They could hire all 10 or hire 0...hopefully all 10. I was told each interview will take an hour and in that hour they have to decide if you have the right stuff considering they are not doing a sim check or anything. (no counting all the saab training you have to do later.) I have been studying like crazy mostly out of the book titled, "Questions, Questions" by Kit Darby. It should be in the pilot shop. Seems to be a great book for your standard interview questions. I was also told alot will be on attitude and do they want to take a 4 day trip with you. As soon as I learn more, I will let everyone know, especially after the interview. I will be back at FSI on monday the 14th so if anyone wants to meet up to study or chat send me an email to FSIFLYER@HOTMAIL.COM. Take care everyone and fly safe...keep the blue side up in other words.

--FSIFLYER
"Soldier by day, Lover by night, Drunkard by choice, but Marine by G-D!!"
 

chunk75

Well-Known Member
Here's a few interview reports on ASA...there are TONS more, for every airline.

From www.aviationinterviews.com


Date of interview (year, month, day): 2002-09-25
Date interview was submitted (year, month, day, time): 2002-10-09 21:20:07
Were you hired as a result of this interview? yes
Total flight time: 6200
PIC flight time: 2000
PIC TURBINE flight time: 700
Total multi engine flight time: 5000
Did someone walk in your application/ resume? yes
How many letters of recommendation did you bring? 0
Are you a CFI? no
Are you a CFII? no
Are you a MEI? no
How long after you sent your resume were you called? 2 weeks
Do you have a college degree? 4 year
Do you have a military background? no
What is your current job? 121
What is your age? 34
What aircraft were you assigned? ?
If you were hired what is your training date? 2000-01-01


Interview experience:
I had two internal recommendations and one of the guys talked to both Dean and Shawn on my behalf. I’ve no doubt that’s why I got the call for an interview. I am about to be furloughed from a Major. I arrived at 0800 for an 0830 appointment. There were just two of us and the other guy was a 1600 hour CFI and a former ACA intern with the UND Bridge program. We started with the written test at around 0840. I received the “B” version and he had the “A” version. Though we were unsupervised we didn’t speak during the test. The essay question was as advertised “What makes a good captain and why?” There was more than sufficient time to finish, especially since I’d already made a mental outline of what to write. Then we had a fifteen minute sit and met with one of the guys for the next interview slot. The interview was two-on-two with Shawn and a CRJ captain. They were very friendly and completely straightforward. Since my experience differed greatly from the other guy’s they asked us completely different kinds of questions. After a “please introduce yourself” the questions they asked me: What makes a good FO? Have I ever declared an Emergency? (I have, twice. After I told him about the first time he said in the interest of time I don’t have to tell him about the second. At that point Shawn wanted to see what I entered in my logbook for it.) Outside FAF on a non-precision and the RVR goes below mins. What do I do? Read a NOTAM. (Folks, I read NOTAMs every day but I never much think about the gobbledygook numbers. Bad mistake; it made me look stupid.) How do I feel about flying with captains who are younger and much less experienced than I am? How do I feel about RJs, the pilots who fly them, and their effect on the industry? Why ACA and where else am I considering? Questions they asked the other guy: Scenario: the captain has a buddy on board who’s a Private Pilot and he’s invited to ride on the jumpseat. What would you do? Follow-up question: let’s say the captain talked you into it and the guy rode on the jumpseat. It happened that there was a Fed on board who saw it all. As the FO are you subject to violation as well? Brief an approach. (I forgot which one, but there was nothing tricky.) What’s the big arrow mean on the plan view? On the Jason STAR to IAD what do you do upon reaching the final intersection without receiving guidance from ATC? (There’s a 190 heading depicted. I guess some people miss that.) Read a METAR. (nothing tricky) How did you like the Bridge program? Do you have anything to add (to my response) as to what makes a good FO? To both of us: any questions? To summarize: there were no games and no playing answers off each other. The CFI kid was really sharp and I’ve no doubt he’ll be hired. The interview lasted about forty minutes total. I had the feeling that they were trying to move things along. After another fifteen minute wait they gave us the AST300 flight briefing sheet. No surprises. They wanted 500fpm climbs/descents and 150kias cruise/120kias approach. Power settings were given as 24”-25” cruise, 18” descent, and 16” approach. They gave us the option of deciding who’d go first. I’d practiced on a Frasca 142 and I found the AST much more squirrelly. The localizer needle stuck and jumped a lot which made tracking the localizer kind of challenging. As previously mentioned here: after a few minutes of warm-up turns and climbs I tracked to TILLE NDB on the IAD ILS 1R. They assigned a hold, I told them how I would enter the hold then they gave me a vector for the ILS. About 100’ before minimums they told me to go-around. Then an engine failed, I feathered it and once I started climbing at blue-line it was over. A captain was training another guy to administer the sim-ride and this other guy made a big mistake that really confused me. When he gave me a vector for the ILS he then stated that I was “cleared for the approach”. The problem was that I was heading away from the LOC. I queried him twice until the captain finally clarified that I was in fact still on vectors. What a pain. After the ride was over he asked me to debrief myself and at that point I confessed to all my airspeed and heading excursions. He said I’d done “average to above-average”. I could've and should've have done better.




Date of interview (year, month, day): 2002-08-28
Date interview was submitted (year, month, day, time): 2002-08-31 18:38:20
Were you hired as a result of this interview? waiting to hear
Total flight time: 2850
PIC flight time: 1720
PIC TURBINE flight time: 610
Total multi engine flight time: 1756
Did someone walk in your application/ resume? no
How many letters of recommendation did you bring? 0
Are you a CFI? yes
Are you a CFII? yes
Are you a MEI? no
How long after you sent your resume were you called? 1 weeks
Do you have a college degree? 4 year
Do you have a military background? no
What is your current job? 135
What is your age? 27
What aircraft were you assigned? N/A
If you were hired what is your training date? 2002-08-31


Interview experience:
Day 1 consists of a 30 minute interview and a sim. eval. Some questions I was asked: What makes an airplane stall? Define Vmc. What is P factor? Max airspeed in Class B airspace? What are the cloud clearance requirements in Class B? Where is the final approach fix on an ILS? Define severe icing. What is the wake turbulence spacing for a small aircraft landing behind a 757? How far should you fly around a thunderstorm? What are the IFR altitudes above FL 290 for an aircraft heading between 0 and 179 degrees? You are doing 210 knots with a 30 knot tailwind and you must descend from 21000 to 11000 feet. How far will you travel? What is a MOCA? Flashing red light gun signal in air means what? What's a microburst? What kind of winds are associated with a warm front? What does BR mean in a METAR? What type of engines does the airplane you fly have? How much thrust do they produce? How much fuel does it hold? Emergency gear extension? Tell me about an emergency you've had? The sim lasted about 30 minutes. Take off from Albany, GA, climb at 180 knots, do 2 30 degree bank turns, hold at PZD, track 178 degree radial outbound, lose an engine, then gain engine back and shoot ILS 4. All pitch and power settings are given in the brief. Day 2 consists of a 30 question test, another 30 minute interview and then the fingerprinting/drug test. Some types of questions on the test: Where is bleed air taken from? Symptoms of tunnel vision. When do you have to report an accident to the FAA? What does FAR 25 deal with? FAR 121? Flashing white light gun signal in air? Flashing red in air? What is an MOA? Symptoms of hypoxia and hyperventilation? Holding pattern entry. Small aircraft landing behind heavy. Question about a hold short symbol and a Runway Approach Holding Area sign. Several questions about Roanoke approach plate. The second interview only consisted of approach plate and low/high enroute chart questions: RCO symbol. MEA. MOCA. Class D operating hours. Compulsory reporting point. Tick marks around airport symbol (fuel available). Time zone boundary line. TACAN symbol. MAA. Low vs. High VOR. Brief the Nashville ILS plate with G/S OTS. Transitions depicted on the plan view of the approach plate. Areas covered include everything you've ever learned: Private, Instrument, Multi-Engine, etc. The AIM will help prepare you the most. Good luck.




Date of interview (year, month, day): 2002-08-28
Date interview was submitted (year, month, day, time): 2002-09-06 14:25:27
Were you hired as a result of this interview? yes
Total flight time: 4100
PIC flight time: 1500
PIC TURBINE flight time: 0
Total multi engine flight time: 2850
Did someone walk in your application/ resume? no
How many letters of recommendation did you bring? 0
Are you a CFI? no
Are you a CFII? no
Are you a MEI? no
How long after you sent your resume were you called? 1 weeks
Do you have a college degree? 4 year
Do you have a military background? no
What is your current job? 121
What is your age? 32
What aircraft were you assigned? not yet known
If you were hired what is your training date? 2002-10-07


Interview experience:
It was a two day process. Day one, began at 1 pm, at flight safety, for your self, call red roof inn, and they will pick you up at the airport and bring you to the hotel. Flight safety is right across the street from the hotel. The process is as follows. AND, my process was RECENT and different from what others have described!!! You meet the sim evaluator and he brings you in one at a time into a room at flight safety and asks you 25 questions!!! What is P-factor, what kind of wind do you not want when following a 757 or larger jet, - cross wind. I did absolutely awful on the basic questions because I have been flying an MD-80 for a couple of years and had not remembered P-factor or other basic knowledge questions he asked. The sim was on the EMB-120. I had flown the SAAB 340 for 2 years and the EMB was close to the saab. I took off from Albany GA, did straight and level, then tracked along on a radial, then went to the vor next to the airport and entered a hold. Then experienced an engine failure, shut down the engine, and then was given it back. Proceeded to shoot an ILS approach and land the aircraft. The next day, was given a 30 question exam, which I got a score below 70%, (again, it was all basic commercial questions). Went in to a 1 hour interview, and unlike others, my questions lasted about 15 minutes, he asked me while pointing to my written score, what this [expletive deleted] is about, we laughed and he said it will be good to have you on line. I answered all his oral interview questions, and showed I had a pretty laid back and fun personality. I actually got a call for a class date before I even got my letter that I had passed my interview! The people there were all very cordial and polite. Good luck.




Date of interview (year, month, day): 2002-08-12
Date interview was submitted (year, month, day, time): 2002-08-13 10:34:39
Were you hired as a result of this interview? waiting to hear
Total flight time: 3900
PIC flight time: 2800
PIC TURBINE flight time: 2800
Total multi engine flight time: 3900
Did someone walk in your application/ resume? no
How many letters of recommendation did you bring? 0
Are you a CFI? no
Are you a CFII? no
Are you a MEI? no
How long after you sent your resume were you called? 2 weeks
Do you have a college degree? 4 year
Do you have a military background? yes
What is your current job? OTHER
What is your age? 36
What aircraft were you assigned? n/a
If you were hired what is your training date? 2002-12-31


Interview experience:
Day 1 5 dudes, 1 military, 2 charter, 1 121 operator, and one ground school instructor Sim: ATR Meet and Greet 10 minutes. 1 on 1 interview with Sim Instructor. Where are you from, who are you working for, what are you flying… 3 questions each; all different. 1. What happens to stall speed with increase in altitude increases? 2. What do you need to fly above 18,000’ (looking for IFR clearance)? 3. To maintain night currency what must you accomplish, 3 full-stop at night within the last 90 days. Sim: Departure clearance was; right turn to MGM VOR, intercept a radial outbound expect radar vectors…Take off set 8 degrees up. Climb out at 160K (small pitch change maybe up to 10 degrees up). Level off at X altitude, and accelerate to 180K (4 degrees up). Couple of guys forgot basics, like pulling the power back after leveling off and accel to 180K. Hold alt and fly some headings. No steep turns or Vertical S stuff. Proceed direct to MGM descend a couple thousand feet and maintain 220 in descent. Hold on the XXX radial. 2 of 3 made the wrong turn into holding. Once at VOR an engine fails. Brief how you want to shut it down. Push the prop levers all the way up and add power on the operating engine before you shut down. This will prevent you from getting slow. Maintain alt, heading, and airspeed. You get the engine back and the sim is repositioned to an 8 mile ILS final. Listen to the instructor and Trim the aircraft. Everybody passed the sim. Day 2 Meet and Greet 10 minutes 30-question test. 1. Taxiway sign. 2. Demarcation sign 3. Max speed/distance for PT, 250/15 4. Which of following is not a type of Hypoxia 5. What does THP stand for (something about Horse Power), not on my test (can’t remember anymore specific questions) Fingerprinting at the General Office 1 on 1 interview with a line Captain- very laid back. Relax; take your pants and Jack-it-off. One interview was 2 hours long, second was 1 hour, mine was around mins. Spent first 10 minutes going over paperwork. Told me what my score was on the test. (Intern told us that the average is around 75%) 1. 3 good traits someone would say about you/ 3 not so good traits. 2. Questions about Jepp approach plate, how would you fly this, MSA…? 3. On walk around you find a burned out Navigation light. Capt wants to continue the flight. I said you can’t and stuck to my answer, not necessarily what he wanted to hear.




Date of interview (year, month, day): 2002-08-01
Date interview was submitted (year, month, day, time): 2002-09-05 09:19:26
Were you hired as a result of this interview? yes
Total flight time: 3000
PIC flight time: 1000
PIC TURBINE flight time: 50
Total multi engine flight time: 2000
Did someone walk in your application/ resume? no
How many letters of recommendation did you bring? 0
Are you a CFI? yes
Are you a CFII? yes
Are you a MEI? yes
How long after you sent your resume were you called? 1 weeks
Do you have a college degree? 4 year
Do you have a military background? yes
What is your current job? 121
What is your age? 28
What aircraft were you assigned? TBD
If you were hired what is your training date? 2002-10-07


Interview experience:
Great info so far. By far one of the most positive interview experiences ever. Everyone was very friendly and professional. I’m really looking forward to working for these guys. Same two day process. Everything went as previously stated. Only thing different I was asked was. You’re given a late reserve assignment, you show up at the gate, the plane is already loaded and your capt. ( a 23 year old girl) is upset that you’re late. Be professional. Do your job. Explain why you’re late. She is still mad. And now you think she smells like alcohol. Try to be tactful. Maybe someone spilled something on her. Make it clear though that you are not letting the flight go if you think she’s been drinking. That’s it. Be yourself. Be honest. Good luck. Also I asked about problems with the new 70 seat RJ's and mainline Delta's scope clause. No problem for now. They have 4 and will get another 14 in 2003. They've all been ok'd. It's the 90 seat RJ's that they are scoped out of.




Date of interview (year, month, day): 2002-08-01
Date interview was submitted (year, month, day, time): 2002-09-06 16:06:10
Were you hired as a result of this interview? yes
Total flight time: 2000
PIC flight time: 1960
PIC TURBINE flight time: 0
Total multi engine flight time: 700
Did someone walk in your application/ resume? yes
How many letters of recommendation did you bring? 2
Are you a CFI? yes
Are you a CFII? yes
Are you a MEI? yes
How long after you sent your resume were you called? 3 weeks
Do you have a college degree? 4 year
Do you have a military background? no
What is your current job? 135
What is your age? 30
What aircraft were you assigned? N/A
If you were hired what is your training date? 2002-01-01


Interview experience:
The interview was a two-day process. Interviewing was 3 furloughed pilots from the majors and a Part 135 check guy. First day we had a short interview with the sim instructor, with basic questions. Then the sim ride in the Brasilia. At 7:45am the second day we got a letter, all 4 passed. Then we had a 30-question written test, plus a more comprehensive interview. I have listed the questions below in their appropriate category. Day One -Short Interview – 12 questions 1.Have you ever been afraid in a plane? 2.What is the definition of Vmc? 3.What does flashing white light signal mean on ground? 4.How much useable fuel does your aircraft have? What type engines? What types of flaps? How do you extend your landing gear in an emergency? 5.What is the speed limit in class B airspace? 6.What are the VFR clouds and vis requirements in Class B? 7.Where is the FAF on an ILS? What if you are inside the FAF and vis goes below published minimum, can you continue? What if ceiling is 100 feet? If you see the rabbit at the DH, can you descend? 8.What makes an airplane stall? 9.What is P-factor? 10.Define severe icing. 11.What does BR on a METAR mean? 12.What is the minimum altitude you can fly under IFR? -Sim ride We flew the Brasilia. You will sit right seat and be paired with another interviewee. You will work together. The PNF will simulate working the radio and writing down ATIS and clearances. You can use him to bug headings, altitudes, do call-outs, repeat clearances, etc. Profile: T/O out of ABY on RWY 4, turn left direct to PZD VOR, climb to 3000. Upon reaching VOR, track outbound on 270 radial, then climb to 6000. At 6, he gave me some 180-degree turns with 30 degree banks, both right and left. Then he told me to turn back to the VOR, and gave holding instructions. I briefed the hold, including type entry, initial headings, turns, etc. I got it right, he cancelled hold instructions, and gave me a vector for ILS 4. As soon as I got established, he cut the left engine. Recover as you would in the plane you have been flying – wants to see you identify the appropriate engine, then feather and shut it down. Then he put it on flight hold, gave the engine back and trimmed it back properly. Then he gave vectors for the ILS with weather at 200 feet and ½ mile. Shoot it down to minimums, evaluation stops once you hit 200 feet, which was good for me, because I almost ran off the runway on the landing. CRM did not appear to be as important as did instrument skills, knowledge of hold entry, and engine shut-down procedures. He’s not looking for a type rating on the Brasilia, but wants to see good instrument skills. My partner and I both did everything right and passed the first day. I’m not sure if you will pass if you screw up the hold, shut down the wrong engine, or chase the needle all over the place on the ILS. Maybe you will. The other gouges give good advice on how to fly the sim. Day Two -Written Test 1.What does EFIS stand for? 2.What are the indications of a frontal passage? 3.What percentage of cloud cover is scattered? 4.What is the highest altitude that you can fly without providing Oxygen to your passengers? 5.What type of weather report would you find CAT on? 6.You leave Miami at 1400z and fly to Dallas. ETE is 1 hour, 30 mins. What time is it when you arrive in Dallas in local time in July? 7.Where is the final approach fix on an ILS? 8.Aircraft performance better on a humid hot day or humid dry day? 9.Aircraft performance with high pressure or low pressure. 10.Start of the mature stage of a thunderstorm. That’s all I remember. -Long interview It took 45 minutes. He began by going through my logbook and asking certain things. Then we went over my paperwork to make sure it was all in order. Then I had to sign a few forms. The interview began by going through Jeppesen approach plates and en route charts. He asked a lot of symbology on both. He asked about systems on current plane I am flying. He asked about 135 regs, since that’s what I’m doing currently. He then gave some scenarios and asked what I would do, e.g. 1. the drunk captain, 2. captain tells you en route that he wants to go below minimums if at destination it is below. 3. There’s a level 3 t-storm 12:00 20 miles. ATC does not approve deviation left or right. What do you do? That was basically it. The best thing I did to prepare was to go through all these AviationInterviews.com gouges, because I had seen or heard practically every question I got. The only thing that has changed was the written test. Actually, the guy who interviewed me said he recently changed them because there were some stupid questions on it prepared by their interns. But both orals are right on. One other thing, they said they are finished hiring for 2002 because they have about 100 people in the hiring pool, so will not be interviewing until January 1, 2003. But that could change any time. Good luck!




Date of interview (year, month, day): 2002-07-30
Date interview was submitted (year, month, day, time): 2002-08-08 20:43:06
Were you hired as a result of this interview? waiting to hear
Total flight time: 3200
PIC flight time: 2000
PIC TURBINE flight time: 1500
Total multi engine flight time: 2000
Did someone walk in your application/ resume? no
How many letters of recommendation did you bring? 0
Are you a CFI? yes
Are you a CFII? yes
Are you a MEI? yes
How long after you sent your resume were you called? 1 weeks
Do you have a college degree? 4 year
Do you have a military background? yes
What is your current job? OTHER
What is your age? 29
What aircraft were you assigned? ?
If you were hired what is your training date? 2002-08-08


Interview experience:
The previous gouge was right on. The interviewing process was very laid back. The first day consisted of the simulator check and verifying your times in the log books. Like the other info mentioned, pay extra attention to the paper work to be filled out for the company. I think depending on your time will determine what type of technical questions your asked. Mine were very simple, Jepp charts approach plates,emergency landing gear etc. The technical portion lasted maybe 10 minutes very easy stuff. The sim ride was very straightforward. For those of you flying glass, It might not be a bad idea to get a little Frasca time to get the scan back,I did and it helped. Everyone in my interview class received a letter for phase two. Oh yeah, there were 3 Regional guys, 1 Major Airline guy, and myself, military. The second day again was very laid back. We took the written test (there are two great books put out by Air Inc, the first one is Airline Pilots Technical Interview Reference Manual and the second is Questions? Questions? Both books are 25.00 bucks each but they cover the questions that you’ll need to know. If your like me, I hate looking through the Gleim written books or reading the FAR/AIM to try figuring out what in the hell they may ask. These books were time savers and a great investment for any Airline job. And no I do not work for Air Inc!). Anyhow, after the test we went in for our one on one interview. Their was an RJ captain doing the interviewing and man did he look young. Really great guy though. He ask about weather mins for takeoff ie departure procedures and a lot of Jepp chart and approach plate questions. After that the standard HR questions, drunk captain, what makes a good captain, fo, what’s your definition of professionalism, etc. The guy interviewing me went out of his way to make me feel at ease. Good Luck!!




Date of interview (year, month, day): 2002-07-30
Date interview was submitted (year, month, day, time): 2002-08-12 20:16:01
Were you hired as a result of this interview? yes
Total flight time: 2500
PIC flight time: 1900
PIC TURBINE flight time: 1300
Total multi engine flight time: 2200
Did someone walk in your application/ resume? no
How many letters of recommendation did you bring? 0
Are you a CFI? no
Are you a CFII? no
Are you a MEI? no
How long after you sent your resume were you called? 2 weeks
Do you have a college degree? 4 year
Do you have a military background? yes
What is your current job? OTHER
What is your age? 35
What aircraft were you assigned? waiting
If you were hired what is your training date? 2000-01-01


Interview experience:
We had 6 applicants. 1 airline Airbus driver, two USAF military, and 3 part 135 turbine pilots. One was a re-applicant there for the second time. For those of you worried about maybe not making it the first time, don’t worry you may have a second chance. Don’t ever think that just because you didn’t make it the first time that you can’t try again. Phase I was the simulator interview at Flight Safety International (FSI). The FSI interviewer was very friendly and worked very hard to put everyone at ease. One-on-one consisted of a short review of your flying experience and some basic totals from your logbook. He asked what was “your worst emergency”. Other questions consisted of basic airmanship and multiengine aerodynamics. The only question on procedures and regulations was two light gun signal questions. Airmanship and aerodynamics covered included factors for Vmc, and a short discussion on how each factor affects performance and why. He asked how to fly with an engine is out and how to recover engine out below Vmc. The simulator portion was right on what others have said. The profile was very basic and flown from the right seat. Takeoff, constant airspeed climb (200KIAS), fly direct to a VOR and hold, after entry into hold fly outbound on a radial, fail an engine, give you back the engine, then vectors to an ILS to minimums and land. The whole profile took about 30 mins. He made everyone fly from the right seat. We used the Brasilia EMB-120 simulator. He will give you all the power settings and if you forget them in the sim everyone was able to ask again what power settings should work for an airspeed and configuration. He will not help you adjust from the baseline power settings he gives you. Use your basic pitch and power setting crosscheck and you’ll do fine. A word of warning, the Brasilia is very touchy in throttle movement. Even the smallest change in throttle position is too much. You spend a lot of your crosscheck correcting power adjustments and evening out asymmetric torque. Also, after you make any power changes and get it to where you want, USE THE RUDER TRIM! it will make your life easier. I was able to keep the sim very stable by constantly moving my left hand from the throttle quadrant to the manual pitch trim, to the ruder trim. If I didn’t make any airspeed, or pitch changes the sim became very stable, but as soon as I had to move the throttles it was back to the left handing making constant adjustments until performance settled down. One more thing, I had a lot of negative transfer of habit patterns from other aircraft. Do not use too much rudder when the engine fails. If he does it at 200KIAS it takes only toe pressure to maintain control and it is a “non-event”. I don’t know what it would require at lower airspeeds closer to Vmc. All of us had an engine failure at 180 to 200KIAS. We all received letters the next morning inviting us to continue to Phase II so we couldn’t have done that bad as a group. We all complained about our performance. Keep the big picture and remember he is looking for basic airmanship/crosscheck, not your ability to fly a plane you’ve never flown before. Phase II was the introduction to ASA, 30 question multiple choice test, paperwork/logbook review, one-on-one interview and drug screening. The 30-question test covers ATP knowledge (FAR/AIM). They even had some medical/physiology questions. Each of us had different versions. Some questions where straightforward and some were very vague. The six of us poled each other; scores all seemed low so don’t get nervous when you take the test. It is designed to be hard and you will miss questions. They give you as much time as you need so take the time to read the full question and understand what they are asking before looking at the answers. They divided us between two line pilots for our one-on-one interview. The two interviews were very different. Apparently the other interviewer asked lots of situational human resources type questions with very little technical questions. My interviewer was the exact opposite. He asked all three of us 30 mins of technical FAR/AIM questions relating them to situations and only about 2 or 3 CRM type questions. Some of the questions were very basic knowledge and others he definitely wanted to see the level of in-depth knowledge and ability to apply knowledge. Some questions were very narrow short answers and others were very open ended were he wanted me to regurgitate what I knew. He was very friendly and would restate the question if I was not going in the direction he wanted with my answers. Overall everyone we encountered was friendly and professional. They all made us feel welcome. I have been impressed with the people at FSI and ASA.
 
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