I should know this, but.....

cmill

Cold Ass Honky
I think as long as taking pictures from a plane isnt your sole income, then you're fine.
 

Itchy

Well-Known Member
The funny part is if you attach a camera to a small model, snap a few, and sell them, it is illegal.
 

ChasenSFO

hen teaser
Seems like you can't run a business using an airplane obviously, but if I read that right, you can take pictures for fun and accept an offer for sale if approached right? I've been in situations like that where Airliners magazine or someone wanted shots of mine from Jetphotos.net that I took while flying. Not with any intent to sell said picture at the time of taking it, of course.
 

Itchy

Well-Known Member
Seems like you can't run a business using an airplane obviously, but if I read that right, you can take pictures for fun and accept an offer for sale if approached right? I've been in situations like that where Airliners magazine or someone wanted shots of mine from Jetphotos.net that I took while flying. Not with any intent to sell said picture at the time of taking it, of course.
I suppose. But what happens when you get good at it, and develop a reputation, and business just appears?

Check out this guys website/ work:

http://www.gravityshots.com/

http://vimeo.com/gravityshots/videos

Impressive stuff.
 

MidlifeFlyer

Well-Known Member
I suppose. But what happens when you get good at it, and develop a reputation, and business just appears?
You get a commercial certificate?

It's one of those unfortunate (and potentially problematic) Chief Counsel opinions that could just as easily have (and probably should have) gone the other way, leaving the requirement for a commercial certificate for those acting as a photography platform and being paid for flying, not taking pictures.

My question is: since the photography exception to an operating certificate requires that there be no point of landing other than the departure airport, does a commercial pilot who is taking his own pictures violate the rules if he lands solo somewhere?
 

Itchy

Well-Known Member
You get a commercial certificate?

It's one of those unfortunate (and potentially problematic) Chief Counsel opinions that could just as easily have (and probably should have) gone the other way, leaving the requirement for a commercial certificate for those acting as a photography platform and being paid for flying, not taking pictures.

My question is: since the photography exception to an operating certificate requires that there be no point of landing other than the departure airport, does a commercial pilot who is taking his own pictures violate the rules if he lands solo somewhere?
ATP decades ago. Getting to be an old timer. There is no problem I am sure of a private pilot taking pictures, it is selling them that is the tricky part.
 

drunkenbeagle

Gang Member
I guess you can tow a glider while snapping said pictures, which would be legal while snapping said photos with a PPL. You can even be compensated then with cold hard cash then, so long as you are tethered to another aircraft. Makes a lot of sense, eh?

A while back, an FAA Inspector wired up a tow plane around here with cameras - because they wanted some footage to use for something they were doing (not sure if it was for official use or not).
 

tomokc

Well-Known Member
A buddy learned to operate an RC aerial platform (sorry - I have a hard time using "fly" and "aircraft" when talking about these things) using a hi-res digital point & shoot. He even published a coffee table book that was sold with proceeds going to a local charity. He's a smart, cautious guy and cognizant of the 400' altitude limit for his operations. His results are amazing and he's doing quite well.
 

RICHARD5

Well-Known Member
Do it the way Vegas streetwalkers bend the rules. 100 roses for some very expensive paper. Paper comes framed if so desired.
 
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