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How would an accident outside work impact your job?

Inverted25

Well-Known Member
#1
Just curious how a General Aviation accident would impact your flying job. Say you ground loop your cub or something dumb. I do a lot of General Aviation flying and some the guys at work think I'm nuts and think that I am risking my career to have a little fun. I am a Part 91 guy but I am curious how it would impact a 121 guy as well. I never put much thought into it since I grew up around GA flying and I have no real intention of stopping. But would it be a job ender if you got into a minor accident flying your GA plane at your job?
 

Cptnchia

Dissatisfied Customer
#2
Just curious how a General Aviation accident would impact your flying job. Say you ground loop your cub or something dumb. I do a lot of General Aviation flying and some the guys at work think I'm nuts and think that I am risking my career to have a little fun. I am a Part 91 guy but I am curious how it would impact a 121 guy as well. I never put much thought into it since I grew up around GA flying and I have no real intention of stopping. But would it be a job ender if you got into a minor accident flying your GA plane at your job?
As long as you didn’t lose your certs because of it, why would anyone care. Sounds like the guys who told you that are full of it. Much like my first pvt instructor. He was of the opinion that you never declared an emergency because the FAA kept a file on everyone who did and would use it to revoke your certs if you did it too often.

To be honest, I know guys at work, who have bent serious metal at work, and they’re still on the line. If the company keeps you after tearing up one of their planes, I seriously doubt they give an F if you tear up your own plane.
 
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Derg

Naval Intelligence, MCRN
Staff member
#3
Just curious how a General Aviation accident would impact your flying job. Say you ground loop your cub or something dumb. I do a lot of General Aviation flying and some the guys at work think I'm nuts and think that I am risking my career to have a little fun. I am a Part 91 guy but I am curious how it would impact a 121 guy as well. I never put much thought into it since I grew up around GA flying and I have no real intention of stopping. But would it be a job ender if you got into a minor accident flying your GA plane at your job?
Keep flying.
 

Richman

Well-Known Member
#4
The only wrinkle is if you cause a scene when you were supposed to be somewhere else. Way back in the day at another outfit, we had a guy bend metal while he was supposedly out sick.

That's an awkward Kodak moment.
 

CFI A&P

Exploring the world one toilet at a time.
#5
Keep flying. It is nothing to worry about unless you are careless and lose your ticket.

Heck I know a guy that ran his airplane out of gas and still flies for a major.
 

Cessnaflyer

Wooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo
#6
I even got a waiver from my 121 to do some 91 corporate at the same time. I was in a unique position though because the airframe I transitioned to wouldn't be on the property for another 3 months. I feel like a millionaire those 3 months haha.
 

mshunter

Well-Known Member
#10
This is akin to being a helicopter parent, and bubble wrapping your kid. Life is meant to be lived. Don't go act deliberately stupid, but if flying outside of work is so scary, maybe you shouldn't be in a cockpit at work either.
 

Derg

Naval Intelligence, MCRN
Staff member
#11
The only wrinkle is if you cause a scene when you were supposed to be somewhere else. Way back in the day at another outfit, we had a guy bend metal while he was supposedly out sick.

That's an awkward Kodak moment.
"Well, I'll make sure you get a fair hearing, but, you know, there are certainly 'headwinds''
 

mrivc211

Well-Known Member
#12
As long as you didn’t lose your certs because of it, why would anyone care. Sounds like the guys who told you that are full of it. Much like my first pvt instructor. He was of the opinion that you never declared an emergency because the FAA kept a file on everyone who did and would use it to revoke your certs if you did it too often.

To be honest, I know guys at work, who have bent serious metal at work, and they’re still on the line. If the company keeps you after tearing up one of their planes, I seriously doubt they give an F if you tear up your own plane.
I learned pretty quick that most pilots become experts in every subject once they get hired at an airline. I remember when my old regional airline got awarded a contract and was accused of doing it "below cost". I had a jumpseater from another airline that accused my employer of that to my face in my jumpseat. I politely asked him if he was on the BOD or part of the VP flt ops team? He said no, then I said then how would you know. He just stayed quiet. The only time I would ask a pilot for advice is if he is my boss, aka the Chief Pilot, or maybe the HIMS coordinate etc. Someone who knows what they are talking about with a background in the subject matter.
 

z987k

Well-Known Member
#13
I can't see it being a factor at the job you are at.
Getting another one, at least at a desirable place, with an accident... might be harder.
 

JDean3204

Well-Known Member
#16
Really man? Not sure why you feel the need to call me out again on JetCareers with things that you know about my past.

Yes I was involved in a training incident in a 172/RG while finishing up my commercial rating. Caused some A/C damage, did the appropriate paperwork and talked to the Feds in a meeting that lasted maybe 15 minutes. It was a crappy situation and I felt very bad about it, almost quit flying because of it. Luckily I had a few great mentors that wouldn't let me quit. I also learned a lot from the incident and that is how I frame it when interviewing for jobs. I have had four interviews thus far in my career and had job offers at all four even after disclosing the incident. Granted that may not be the case at the next level as it is much more competitive, but that is a bridge that I'll cross when it's time.
 
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av8tr1

"Never tell me the odds!"
#17
Really man? Not sure why you feel the need to call me out again on JetCareers with things that you know about my past.

Yes I was involved in a training incident in a 172/RG while finishing up my commercial rating. Caused some A/C damage, did the appropriate paperwork and talked to the Feds in a meeting that lasted maybe 15 minutes. It was a crappy situation and I felt very bad about it, almost quit flying because of it. Luckily I had a few great mentors that wouldn't let me quit. I also learned a lot from the incident and that is how I frame it when interviewing for jobs. I have had four interviews thus far in my career and had job offers at all four even after disclosing the incident. Granted that may not be the case at the next level as it is much more competitive, but that is a bridge that I'll cross when it's time.
Sorry man, I didn't know it was a sore point for you. It happened, it was no big deal and you moved on to bigger and better things. You did well, you learned from your experience and it hasn't hurt you in any way since. I am sure it wont on your way to the next level either. You made a mistake and learned from it. That's what they want to see.
 

bucksmith

Did you lock the doors?
#20
@Inverted , where are you doing your flying and what kind of flying are you doing? There are different levels of exposure, ranging from flying a champ vfr around the patch in Kansas, to continuing to give flight instruction out of the biggest bottleneck airport in the D.C. SFRA. I still reluctantly do the latter, if I checked three green 64 times, I probably looked at the transponder 65 times!
Everybody is capable of making mistakes, your co-workers are not incorrect. You are certainly exposing yourself to career ending possibilities. Don't stop flying (you won't), but don't let your guard down or get complacent. I treat every flight with the same amount of respect and professionalism, whether I'm in a jet or a 172.