How? Why?

Low&Slow

Ancora imparo
#1
How? Why?
This rivet puller had to be disassembled because it was found jammed like this. I don't know who happened to this, but WTF?
IMG_20181109_002748.jpg
 
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Low&Slow

Ancora imparo
#3
I'm guessing that it was probably one if our general mechanics who had no idea how to put in blind rivets, but decided it can't be that hard to do. smh
 

knot4u

Repeat Offender
#4
I'm guessing that it was probably one if our general mechanics who had no idea how to put in blind rivets, but decided it can't be that hard to do. smh
A fairly inexperienced mechanic that might carry an opinion of their abilities that doesn't match reality can get expensive pretty quick. I once watched, from a distance, a mechanic that wanted to learn more about avionics volunteer to perform 91.411/91.413 checks on a Falcon, somehow he was teamed up with another recent A/P graduate because the avionics tech was busy. I can appreciate the ambition, but having a sense of your limitations is important. I also don't know who they thought was going to sign it off. Regardless, the plane left two days late with two replacement air data computers. Ultimately I guess the responsibilty belongs to the supervisor that allowed it to happen at all.
 
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Low&Slow

Ancora imparo
#10
A fairly inexperienced mechanic that might carry an opinion of their abilities that doesn't match reality can get expensive pretty quick. I once watched, from a distance, a mechanic that wanted to learn more about avionics volunteer to perform 91.411/91.413 checks on a Falcon, somehow he was teamed up with another recent A/P graduate because the avionics tech was busy. I can appreciate the ambition, but having a sense of your limitations is important. I also don't know who they thought was going to sign it off. Regardless, the plane left two days late with two replacement air data computers. Ultimately I guess the responsibilty belongs to the supervisor that allowed it to happen at all.
Wow! That's crazy!

 

Low&Slow

Ancora imparo
#11
Possibly avionics, but I strongly suspect one of the 15Ts (Blackhawk mechanics) because several of them went down to Bakers School of Aeronautics and got their A&P in two-three weeks. Came back thinking they know everything and can do my job too, even though they've never bucked a solid or pulled a blind in their life. The wire biters tend to keep to themselves and not get involved in anything outside of their wheelhouse.
I'm not mad, but when I go back to work Tuesday, I'm going to tell them all not to touch our tools, and offer training to whoever is interested. I will GLADLY show them how to do airframe stuff, all they have to do is ask.
 

knot4u

Repeat Offender
#13
Possibly avionics, but I strongly suspect one of the 15Ts (Blackhawk mechanics) because several of them went down to Bakers School of Aeronautics and got their A&P in two-three weeks. Came back thinking they know everything and can do my job too, even though they've never bucked a solid or pulled a blind in their life. The wire biters tend to keep to themselves and not get involved in anything outside of their wheelhouse.
I'm not mad, but when I go back to work Tuesday, I'm going to tell them all not to touch our tools, and offer training to whoever is interested. I will GLADLY show them how to do airframe stuff, all they have to do is ask.
I'm going to assume you've chosen structures as a specialty, if you're good at it stay with it (I'd also suggest getting as much composite training as possible). In my world, regarding skilled techs, there are a few disciplines: Avionics, Sheet Metal/Structures, Engines, Interior, Cabin Systems, General Tech. That seems to be the menu, I never chose General Tech, Jack of All Trades-Master of None, but that's what I do. All of these people either love or hate each other depending on the project at hand.
 
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Low&Slow

Ancora imparo
#14
Yes, I do airframe repair and fabrication for the Army (MOS 15G - Aircraft Structural Repairer). Aluminum and Stainless mostly, but also some Kevlar, Fiberglass, and Carbon Fiber. We also repair main rotor blades and tail rotor blades for all Army helicopters.
We have basically the same disciplines as you, except that Structures also does interior. We also have avionics/electricians, engines, powertrain, and general mechanic (specific to airframes such as Blackhawks, Apaches, and Chinooks). We all get along pretty well.
I don't have an A&P, but I'm planning to rectify that in 2019 before I go downrange again. I already interviewed with the FSDO and they issued me a 8610-2 for both Airframe and Powerplant, based on experience. I'm not going to Bakers, I don't have the money or enough annual leave to use. Just going to work with an FBO and try to learn more powerplant stuff that might be on the oral/practical.
I plan to just fly after leaving the Army, but the A&P certificates might come in handy. Better to have them and not need them, than to need them and not have them.
 
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Roger Roger

Paid to sleep, fly for fun
#15
I'm going to assume you've chosen structures as a specialty, if you're good at it stay with it (I'd also suggest getting as much composite training as possible). In my world, regarding skilled techs, there are a few disciplines: Avionics, Sheet Metal/Structures, Engines, Interior, Cabin Systems, General Tech. That seems to be the menu, I never chose General Tech, Jack of All Trades-Master of None, but that's what I do. All of these people either love or hate each other depending on the project at hand.
Huh, the only rivalry I really knew of was tin-benders vs. spark-chasers.
 
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