how long to get used to complex aircraft?

Center_Mid

Well-Known Member
How much more complexity and difficulty are added to single-pilot instrument flying when you're flying a complex airplane (CS prop, RG, etc.)? Did you find the transition tough to get used to? How long before you were comfortable flying complex IFR?

Oh, and what aircraft did you train in?
 

pilot602

If specified, this will replace the title that
I went from a 172 to a twin at something like 44 hours total time ...

Single-enigne complex aircraft I can't imagine are that difficult once you get used to the "complex"ities. After awhile you don't even notice/think about the extra levers ...
 

MidlifeFlyer

Well-Known Member
The amount of time to get used to it varies a lot with the pilot and they way he was trained before making the transition. But assuming the transition is within make, like from a 172 to a 172 RG or an Archer to an Arrow, most pilots can be up to speed in 3-5 hours.
 

Alchemy

Partner, Ally, Friend
I got my high performance and complex endorsements after 6 hours of dual in the 182 RG, previously I had flown nothing but 172's, 150's, and 152's. Even so, I still had to get 10 hours dual in the 182 before I could rent it on my own (insurance requirement).
 

n2o2diver

New Member
I didn't think the complex parts ie RG, CS prop posed much of a problem, but two engines and the associated speed reduced the "TIME" to get everything done, until you catch up with the plane and become proficient.
 

Alchemy

Partner, Ally, Friend
To elaborate a bit more, most of the "difficulty" in flying complex aircraft comes from the faster speeds at which they operate. It really doesn't take much extra time to extend and retract the gear, open and close the cowl flaps, and adjust the prop RPM. Flying at 150 knots vs 100 knots makes a bigger difference than a few extra controls do.
 

E_Dawg

Moderator
I'm doing my first single pilot IFR op in a complex tomorrow.... I'll let you know how it goes.


I felt pretty good after the first flight with my instructor, it's really not too difficult as long as you remember to put the wheels down.


It's like this: When I fly a 152 I almost feel like I'm strapping it onto me like a backpack. Same thing in my old '89 Honda Accord... everything's so simple and fun, and you always know what's gonna happen including all the little quirks.

Then moving up from the Honda to a 'new' used '93 Mecury Sable, it's kind of foreign. The shocks are better, the seats are leather, the car's much bigger, and it even has a radio
. I can drive it just fine, of course, but it's just kind of... 'wierd'. Same thing in the Arrow.

Wow I hope that made sense.
 

pilot602

If specified, this will replace the title that
Heh ... try flying 300 hours in a 3,800lbs. aircraft and then go fly a 1,200lbs., fabric-covered, no-flap-or-advanced-instruments aircraft where upon someone thought it'd be agood idea to put the nosewheel on the ass-end of the contraption. That's "weird!"
 

zombie5225

New Member
I got my HIPO checkout in a C-182 right after I got my PPL. When it came time to move up to the complex I was already set, I just had to remember to put the gear down(so far so good
)
 

Minuteman

“Dongola”
[ QUOTE ]
Heh ... try flying 300 hours in a 3,800lbs. aircraft and then go fly a 1,200lbs., fabric-covered, no-flap-or-advanced-instruments aircraft where upon someone thought it'd be agood idea to put the nosewheel on the ass-end of the contraption.

[/ QUOTE ]
Heh ... that has to make you pretty neurotic, "I've adjusted every knob and lever this thing has and I've still got free time to enjoy the scenery! What am I doing wrong?!?"
 

ready2fly

Well-Known Member
I went from training in 172's and Warriors... to the BE95 (Beech) Travel Air for my complex AND twin training.

Now THAT's a lot of stuff to get used to, but like another poster mentioned, once you've been in the plane a few times, it becomes more "natural".

As for the time it takes to get proficient... I'm about 15 hrs into the Multi-Engine/Instrument training and should have my checkride in about a week or two.

[Not that the checkride will make me "proficient", but I do feel comfortable in the plane. Proficiency comes with experience as we all know.]

I would imagine that it's a little less time in a Complex single.

Best of luck, Needle!!

R2F
 

flyboy04

Well-Known Member
Ive had absolutley no problems what so ever getting used to complex operations, and to my suprise i absolutley love going fast, never thought it would make that big of a deal to me. The one thing i find difficult is slowing to 90knots to shoot an approach, but after one i learned the large amount power you have to take out.
 
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