hello

DogwoodLynx

Well-Known Member
#21
Weather rarely just “pops” up.


Use your weather sources. Check the convective forecasts, lift indexes, etc.

You get to notice trends.

Example:

Summer in FL - weather will blow up in the afternoons especially over the Everglades.

Winters in FL - Foggy from PNS/TLH to MCO/TPA until mid day (ish). Delays and use of 3585 likely. Heavy fuel loads and bumping PAX also likely.
 

4EngineETOPS

Well-Known Member
#24
Maybe if flying cargo... But if you're flying paseengers, airlines don't look at it that way. If you only "take few" you have to ask for volunteers not to go and have to give them money and place them in hotels at times, which is more of an expense... Some volunteers are offered more then $800... And you said "better then take a lot of people nowhere"???? When would that be the case??? If you divert due to WX most likely course of action is fuel up and go as soon as the weather improves... Taking a "few people" consistently is not better then taking everyone all the time and diverting for FuleAndGo once in a while.
Again, your life as a dispatcher is much harder when you barely have any hold fuel, but I don't think there are any major airlines anymore that don't put a lot of focus on fuel consumption. So, as a new dispatcher in this business, you should understand that deciding how much fuel to put on your aircraft is something you will have to pay a lot of attention to... That's why when you see a tanker flight you will be very happy
Being able to bump X number of pounds of inanimate objects in lieu of humans is one of the benefits of being a freight dog. It's a lot easier to bump a number representing some boxes rather than a number representing people who each have places to be, things to do, and lives to live. That being said, obviously I try to maximize the cargo I can get on board while being prudent with fuel. I think it's important to remember the human factor on the other side of the screen, which is sometimes lost in the numbers and workload. Even cargo can be attached to a human factor: businesses, people, and even governments have a lot at stake. While safety is paramount, I try to keep in mind what our decisions as both dispatchers and pilots have on the public we transport.
 

who'swho

Don't hesitate. Penetrate!
#25
Being able to bump X number of pounds of inanimate objects in lieu of humans is one of the benefits of being a freight dog. It's a lot easier to bump a number representing some boxes rather than a number representing people who each have places to be, things to do, and lives to live. That being said, obviously I try to maximize the cargo I can get on board while being prudent with fuel. I think it's important to remember the human factor on the other side of the screen, which is sometimes lost in the numbers and workload. Even cargo can be attached to a human factor: businesses, people, and even governments have a lot at stake. While safety is paramount, I try to keep in mind what our decisions as both dispatchers and pilots have on the public we transport.
I found it easier to bump a couple pax. Never received any blowback about it. In fact most airlines have a policy of taking bags over pax. Bump cargo tho... and you got problems.
 

Altimeter

Well-Known Member
#27
Being able to bump X number of pounds of inanimate objects in lieu of humans is one of the benefits of being a freight dog. It's a lot easier to bump a number representing some boxes rather than a number representing people who each have places to be, things to do, and lives to live. That being said, obviously I try to maximize the cargo I can get on board while being prudent with fuel. I think it's important to remember the human factor on the other side of the screen, which is sometimes lost in the numbers and workload. Even cargo can be attached to a human factor: businesses, people, and even governments have a lot at stake. While safety is paramount, I try to keep in mind what our decisions as both dispatchers and pilots have on the public we transport.
Hmm
 

PlaneFan82

Well-Known Member
#31
I found it easier to bump a couple pax. Never received any blowback about it. In fact most airlines have a policy of taking bags over pax. Bump cargo tho... and you got problems.
Not true! We bump cargo...just roll it to dayside or truck it. The fuel has to fly!


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#33
Coming from a gate agent, some people will gladly leave later in the day or the following day for a few hundred dollars (that sometimes don't even cover the price of their basic economy fare). There's also days where you can't get volunteers for less than $700 a piece. I think people are more willing to volunteer these days because the compensation has improved for the most part, especially following the recent involuntary denied boarding incidents.

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