Helicopter to Fixed wing transition

FlyingScot

Spanish Proficient
I have a friend who is a high time rotor pilot but wants to get his fixed wing. What are the requirements?
 

FlyingScot

Spanish Proficient
Thanks Blackhawk that does help clarify things, however the FAA and I don't read the regs the same way

According to the FAA you need 3 hours of preparation for the checkride, 3 of night, 3 of x-country, 3 under the hood and 10 solo. The FAA reads that as 22 hours of single engine time to qualify for the test.

I read that as 13 hours total.

Here is my lesson plan:
Day one is a 3 hour night x-country under the hood in preparation for the checkride.
Day 2, solo sign off, 10 hours of touch and goes.
Day 3 stage check.
Day 4 checkride.
 

Rotor2Wing

Unapologetically American
Thanks Blackhawk that does help clarify things, however the FAA and I don't read the regs the same way

According to the FAA you need 3 hours of preparation for the checkride, 3 of night, 3 of x-country, 3 under the hood and 10 solo. The FAA reads that as 22 hours of single engine time to qualify for the test.

I read that as 13 hours total.

Here is my lesson plan:
Day one is a 3 hour night x-country under the hood in preparation for the checkride.
Day 2, solo sign off, 10 hours of touch and goes.
Day 3 stage check.
Day 4 checkride.
Its actually a total of 30 hours:

20 hours dual

10 hours solo

You still have to meet the requirements of 61.109 (a)

You also give a PIC endorsement not a solo endorsement. The solo endorsement is for student pilots not a rated pilot doing an add on.
 

Rotor2Wing

Unapologetically American
FlyingScot If you remember that when you do an add-on changing category you still have meet the dual/solo requirements listed in the FARs its hard to goof up on determining what training is needed.
 

Rotor2Wing

Unapologetically American
I might have to add another day on my lesson plan then.;)
Probably a good idea maybe even a couple. They will have to do their solo XCs and 3 TO and LDGs at a controlled field if your not on one already. I know when I went in to do my SEL add-on I had visions of it being very fast. I was wrong! If your student has no airplane time he will struggle more than he thinks he will going in. My biggest hurdle was keeping my speed up on final. I wanted to slow the approach at the end to come to a hover. It was just muscle memory taking over and I had to overcome it. Even now I still find my helicopter flying mindset in the back of my mind all the time.
 

FlyingScot

Spanish Proficient
FlyingScot If you remember that when you do an add-on changing category you still have meet the dual/solo requirements listed in the FARs its hard to goof up on determining what training is needed.
Actually I don't remember much, last time I CFI'd was 2006, and the FARs I have are designed for flight crew and does not have part 61 in it. The FARs pt 61 is only one of the many things I will have to relearn if I decide to start teaching again.

I have found part 61 online. As far as I can tell unless it is listed under "in a single-engine airplane", the 40 hour and 20 hour requirements listed in 61.109(a) are covered by previous helicopter experiences.

Sec. 61.109

(a) For an airplane single-engine rating. Except as provided in paragraph (k) of this section, a person who applies for a private pilot certificate with an airplane category and single-engine class rating must log at least 40 hours of flight time that includes at least 20 hours of flight training from an authorized instructor and 10 hours of solo flight training in the areas of operation listed in Sec. 61.107(b)(1) of this part, and the training must include at least--
(1) 3 hours of cross-country flight training in a single-engine airplane;
(2) Except as provided in Sec. 61.110 of this part, 3 hours of night flight training in a single-engine airplane that includes--
(i) One cross-country flight of over 100 nautical miles total distance; and
(ii) 10 takeoffs and 10 landings to a full stop (with each landing involving a flight in the traffic pattern) at an airport.
(3) 3 hours of flight training in a single-engine airplane on the control and maneuvering of an airplane solely by reference to instruments, including straight and level flight, constant airspeed climbs and descents, turns to a heading, recovery from unusual flight attitudes, radio communications, and the use of navigation systems/facilities and radar services appropriate to instrument flight;
(4) 3 hours of flight training with an authorized instructor in a single-engine airplane in preparation for the practical test, which must have been performed within the preceding 2 calendar months from the month of the test; and
(5) 10 hours of solo flight time in a single-engine airplane, consisting of at least--
(i) 5 hours of solo cross-country time;
(ii) One solo cross country flight of 150 nautical miles total distance, with full-stop landings at three points, and one segment of the flight consisting of a straight-line distance of more than 50 nautical miles between the takeoff and landing locations; and
(iii) Three takeoffs and three landings to a full stop (with each landing involving a flight in the traffic pattern) at an airport with an operating control tower.
(b) For an airplane multiengine rating. Except as provided in paragraph (k) of this section, a person who applies for a private pilot certificate with an airplane category and multiengine class rating must log at least 40 hours of flight time that includes at least 20 hours of flight training from an authorized instructor and 10 hours of solo flight training in the areas of operation listed in Sec. 61.107(b)(2) of this part, and the training must include at least--
 

FlyingScot

Spanish Proficient
Probably a good idea maybe even a couple. They will have to do their solo XCs and 3 TO and LDGs at a controlled field if your not on one already. I know when I went in to do my SEL add-on I had visions of it being very fast. I was wrong! If your student has no airplane time he will struggle more than he thinks he will going in. My biggest hurdle was keeping my speed up on final. I wanted to slow the approach at the end to come to a hover. It was just muscle memory taking over and I had to overcome it. Even now I still find my helicopter flying mindset in the back of my mind all the time.
I am only coming up with the minimum time he is required to have. I actually expect to take 25 or more hours. I never thought about it but the helicopter time could create negative transference while trying to land. Once that hurdle is over the rest of the skills should be easy.
 

Rotor2Wing

Unapologetically American
Actually I don't remember much, last time I CFI'd was 2006, and the FARs I have are designed for flight crew and does not have part 61 in it. The FARs pt 61 is only one of the many things I will have to relearn if I decide to start teaching again.

I have found part 61 online. As far as I can tell unless it is listed under "in a single-engine airplane", the 40 hour and 20 hour requirements listed in 61.109(a) are covered by previous helicopter experiences.

Sec. 61.109

(a) For an airplane single-engine rating. Except as provided in paragraph (k) of this section, a person who applies for a private pilot certificate with an airplane category and single-engine class rating must log at least 40 hours of flight time that includes at least 20 hours of flight training from an authorized instructor and 10 hours of solo flight training in the areas of operation listed in Sec. 61.107(b)(1) of this part, and the training must include at least--
(1) 3 hours of cross-country flight training in a single-engine airplane;
(2) Except as provided in Sec. 61.110 of this part, 3 hours of night flight training in a single-engine airplane that includes--
(i) One cross-country flight of over 100 nautical miles total distance; and
(ii) 10 takeoffs and 10 landings to a full stop (with each landing involving a flight in the traffic pattern) at an airport.
(3) 3 hours of flight training in a single-engine airplane on the control and maneuvering of an airplane solely by reference to instruments, including straight and level flight, constant airspeed climbs and descents, turns to a heading, recovery from unusual flight attitudes, radio communications, and the use of navigation systems/facilities and radar services appropriate to instrument flight;
(4) 3 hours of flight training with an authorized instructor in a single-engine airplane in preparation for the practical test, which must have been performed within the preceding 2 calendar months from the month of the test; and
(5) 10 hours of solo flight time in a single-engine airplane, consisting of at least--
(i) 5 hours of solo cross-country time;
(ii) One solo cross country flight of 150 nautical miles total distance, with full-stop landings at three points, and one segment of the flight consisting of a straight-line distance of more than 50 nautical miles between the takeoff and landing locations; and
(iii) Three takeoffs and three landings to a full stop (with each landing involving a flight in the traffic pattern) at an airport with an operating control tower.
(b) For an airplane multiengine rating. Except as provided in paragraph (k) of this section, a person who applies for a private pilot certificate with an airplane category and multiengine class rating must log at least 40 hours of flight time that includes at least 20 hours of flight training from an authorized instructor and 10 hours of solo flight training in the areas of operation listed in Sec. 61.107(b)(2) of this part, and the training must include at least--

I am only coming up with the minimum time he is required to have. I actually expect to take 25 or more hours. I never thought about it but the helicopter time could create negative transference while trying to land. Once that hurdle is over the rest of the skills should be easy.

Look at the part that I bolded. Thats where the 30 hours is required. You have to do 20 hours dual and the 10 hours solo. The only thing that is a carry over from the rotorcraft category is the 40 hours flight time.
 

FlyingScot

Spanish Proficient
Thanks R2W, I see it now. Whenever the FARs refer to "Sec XXXXX(1)(x), of this part" my eyes glaze over and I am grateful I did not go to law school and had to read this drivel every day.
 

Rotor2Wing

Unapologetically American
Thanks R2W, I see it now. Whenever the FARs refer to "Sec XXXXX(1)(x), of this part" my eyes glaze over and I am grateful I did not go to law school and had to read this drivel every day.
Oh don't worry it is hard to figure out sometimes. I do not know many CFIs that have the RW to FW figured out the first time around. The only CFIs that deal with it on a regular basis are the guys that do it around Ft. Rucker, AL.
 

nosehair

Well-Known Member
Thanks R2W, I see it now. Whenever the FARs refer to "Sec XXXXX(1)(x), of this part" my eyes glaze over and I am grateful I did not go to law school and had to read this drivel every day.
Then you should quit pretending to be a cfi- regulatory knowledge and appropriate application of regulations is a large part of the certification process.
Sounds harsh, I know, but the lackadaisical attitude of the "occasional" cfi is a big part of the problem, sir.
 

///AMG

Well-Known Member
Then you should quit pretending to be a cfi- regulatory knowledge and appropriate application of regulations is a large part of the certification process.
Sounds harsh, I know, but the lackadaisical attitude of the "occasional" cfi is a big part of the problem, sir.
Grumpy old man...

:)
 

FlyingScot

Spanish Proficient
Then you should quit pretending to be a cfi- regulatory knowledge and appropriate application of regulations is a large part of the certification process.
Sounds harsh, I know, but the lackadaisical attitude of the "occasional" cfi is a big part of the problem, sir.
If by occasional you mean every 6 years, I am very occasional. If and when I take on CFIing again I will do some research and studying, but now am concerned of earning the wrath of "real" CFIs.
 

subpilot

Squawking 7600
If you endorse a private rotorcraft pilot to solo fixed wing, what does that endorsement allow? They are not student pilots so what can they do with that endorsement above a student pilot? Where is the reference?
 

Rotor2Wing

Unapologetically American
If you endorse a private rotorcraft pilot to solo fixed wing, what does that endorsement allow? They are not student pilots so what can they do with that endorsement above a student pilot? Where is the reference?
26. ADDITIONAL AIRCRAFT RATINGS (OTHER THAN ATP).
Specific knowledge, flight proficiency, flight experience, and endorsement requirements for additional category, class, or type rating (for other than at the ATP level) are located in section 61.63.

a. Category and Class Ratings.

Applicants adding a category and/or class rating to a recreational pilot certificate or higher must have an instructor’s recommendations and appropriate endorsements. An applicant need not take an additional knowledge test, provided the person holds an airplane, powered-lift, rotorcraft, powered parachute, weight-shift-control aircraft, or airship rating at or above the pilot certificate level sought. An applicant must pass the required practical test appropriate to the pilot certificate for the aircraft category and, if applicable, class rating sought. Additionally, applicants must comply with the requirements of section 61.63, as noted below:

(1) Category Ratings.

Applicants must receive the training and have the aeronautical experience required by part 61 that applies to the pilot certificate level for the category, and if applicable, class rating sought.

(2) Class Ratings.

Applicants must be found competent in the knowledge areas and proficient in the areas of operation for the class rating sought.

(3) Type Ratings.

Applicants must have the required training time, logbook, or training record endorsements, and pass the required practical test in accordance with the ATP/type rating PTS (see section 61.63(d)).

Since a rated pilot will never be a student pilot none of the regulations for student pilots apply to them. The endorsement is a "PIC endorsement for a pilot not holding a category and class rating." It basically allows them to act as PIC while "solo" under all circumstances and doesn't expire unless the CFI places a date in the endorsement. My big Jepp logbook has them pre-printed in the back if you want to check them out look in the back of one of the big books.
 
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