Helibatics

deadstick

Well-Known Member

Shoot. That’s nothing. Most of what he did with Red Bull can be seen daily at any flight school in the world, especially that one west of Dothan, AL, when new students are learning to hover.
 

Lawman

Well-Known Member
Let's take an aircraft that was designed to kill you in every way possible, and now let's start doing tricks in it ...
Meh.

The BO-105 with its fixed rotor head and good power available ratio is one of the least complicated helicopters to maneuver and avoid getting into trouble with.

Now these on the other hand....




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Low&Slow

Ancora imparo
Meh.

The BO-105 with its fixed rotor head and good power available ratio is one of the least complicated helicopters to maneuver and avoid getting into trouble with.

Now these on the other hand....



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OMG Apaches suck. Worst airframe in the history of worst airframes. I f'n HATE working on those pos.
 

Low_Level_Hell

Well-Known Member
Meh.

The BO-105 with its fixed rotor head and good power available ratio is one of the least complicated helicopters to maneuver and avoid getting into trouble with.


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The LUH pretty nimble as well. When I was going through the course in Grande Prairie years ago the instructor kept on remarking how it is fully aerobatic, unfortunately we could never test that theory.

What I always liked about the Apache is I could go do maneuvers that involved 120 degree rolls, fly fast and low in the dark, practice autos and other emergencies and it would just be another day at work.

OMG Apaches suck. Worst airframe in the history of worst airframes. I f'n HATE working on those pos.
I'm a maintenance test pilot on them so I feel ya... especially with the strappack and drivetrain issues definitely giving me a cause for concern, but the worst airframe in history? At least it didn't actively twist itself in two like the CH-46.
 

Lawman

Well-Known Member
* when they’re not grounded due to maintenance....
Don’t hate because you’re just here to carry the mail.

I did at one point in my career start a Dutch Apache that was being put through reset in Mannheim Germany by the theatre sustainment team... hey only have 30 in the whole of their military. It had been sitting on the airfield for close to 4 years between its arrival and that day. Damn thing nearly burned down around us just getting it on the APU.

That backwards taxi trick for the Chinook is actually not that difficult. He sets it up by landing in the profile for a roll on landing that is standard for the Chinook emergency procedure. With locked steering swivels and 2 inches aft cyclic the thrust holds/stops the aircraft via aerodynamic breaking with increasing/decreasing thrust equating to raising/lowering the nose attitude. From there you just apply an excess of neutral (stopped) power and the aircraft will back up. 2 wheel taxi is a standard pilot task for the 47 in case of emergency hydraulic isolation or loss of power steering.
 

MikeD

Administrator
Staff member
Don’t hate because you’re just here to carry the mail.

I did at one point in my career start a Dutch Apache that was being put through reset in Mannheim Germany by the theatre sustainment team... hey only have 30 in the whole of their military. It had been sitting on the airfield for close to 4 years between its arrival and that day. Damn thing nearly burned down around us just getting it on the APU.

That backwards taxi trick for the Chinook is actually not that difficult. He sets it up by landing in the profile for a roll on landing that is standard for the Chinook emergency procedure. With locked steering swivels and 2 inches aft cyclic the thrust holds/stops the aircraft via aerodynamic breaking with increasing/decreasing thrust equating to raising/lowering the nose attitude. From there you just apply an excess of neutral (stopped) power and the aircraft will back up. 2 wheel taxi is a standard pilot task for the 47 in case of emergency hydraulic isolation or loss of power steering.
Speaking of Dutch Apaches.....did they have some kind of aversion to descending below 3000' AGL in Afghan? I'd often see them in the stratosphere up there "escorting".
 

Lawman

Well-Known Member
Speaking of Dutch Apaches.....did they have some kind of aversion to descending below 3000' AGL in Afghan? I'd often see them in the stratosphere up there "escorting".
Apache is a Sniper with Anti-Tank missiles instead of a rifle. Everything about the sighting system and the weapons is built for stand off. The only real close in weapons it has are unguided rockets because the gunner trying to look through the TADS is fighting through a soda straw to find anything close in, and with its size that invites taking rounds on the outbound.

The days of riding shotgun like the B model Hueys slinging rockets riding along side their slick cousins are long gone. Apache needs distance and altitude for setup. Plus with the gun being low velocity in a turret the altitude actually helps the terminal path of the rounds because they fire more direct from altitude.


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