Hawkers

ILS37R

Well-Known Member
#21
I liked the one I flew.

As long as I didn't need to get anywhere fast.
Or get above weather in the first third of the flight.
Or stow baggage.
Or take-off on a hot day.
Or from a high-altitude airport.
Or have any maintenance done, ever.

Alright maybe I didn't like it that much. But the seats were comfy, the flight deck roomy, and it was smooth in cruise.

But those cup holders... what cup on earth were those infuriating things designed to hold?
 
#23
I recently got typed and am flying a Honeywell equipped 800XP. Looking at its innards, particularly the hell hole etc, I would agree it looks like a nightmare to work on, but it does fly well. Ours has API winglets installed and the airplane climbs surprisingly well. We’ve come out of ASE with relatively little fuss and I’ve generally been impressed with it.
I should add,though, that I graduated to this aircraft from the Beechjet so probably not difficult to impress me at this stage.

Bp244
 

mikecweb

Third Generation Arizonan
#24
I liked the one I flew.

As long as I didn't need to get anywhere fast.
Or get above weather in the first third of the flight.
Or stow baggage.
Or take-off on a hot day.
Or from a high-altitude airport.
Or have any maintenance done, ever.

Alright maybe I didn't like it that much. But the seats were comfy, the flight deck roomy, and it was smooth in cruise.

But those cup holders... what cup on earth were those infuriating things designed to hold?
Maybe roomy compared to a Lear.
 

knot4u

Repeat Offender
#25
It's the only airplane I'm aware of that requires partial disassembly of and disconnecting flight control cables to remove/install the APU. And once you do get the APU loose it's hanging by a rope through the top of the fuselage with one guy on top, another inside and one more waiting to receive it outside. Once it's loose the guy inside is essentially trapped until it's out, more than one mechanic has gotten it jammed on the way out and ended up stuck.
 

Cass

You'll have that
#28
Like one FSI instructor says, can't go flying until the Cocks are up and the Muffs are warm.

In all seriousness though, the 900 is fine. Built like Panzer and truly a gentleman's airplane IMO. Sure, it could do a lot of things better but its very hard to hate.
 

knot4u

Repeat Offender
#29
Like one FSI instructor says, can't go flying until the Cocks are up and the Muffs are warm.

In all seriousness though, the 900 is fine. Built like Panzer and truly a gentleman's airplane IMO. Sure, it could do a lot of things better but its very hard to hate.
900 is just an 800 with -50s. It's still a steampunks dream. !000 isn't any better. Just fly them back to England and airline home. I can probably fix just about anything if I'm allowed the time, these days in a 135/145 enviroment yesterday wasn't soon enough. No thanks.
 

Crockrocket94

Well-Known Member
#30
900 is just an 800 with -50s. It's still a steampunks dream. !000 isn't any better. Just fly them back to England and airline home. I can probably fix just about anything if I'm allowed the time, these days in a 135/145 enviroment yesterday wasn't soon enough. No thanks.
Essentially but from a pilots perspective the 900 was pretty great. Decent PL21 with a good interior and XM radio. Also had decent performance compared to any of the 800XP/A series.
 

Cass

You'll have that
#31
900 is just an 800 with -50s. It's still a steampunks dream. !000 isn't any better. Just fly them back to England and airline home. I can probably fix just about anything if I'm allowed the time, these days in a 135/145 enviroment yesterday wasn't soon enough. No thanks.
They do look like a nightmare to work on, anyone bigger than a horse jockey physically can't do anything in the hell hole.
Just pulling out the main ship batteries is a two man job.

Pilot perspective, Craig said it all. I don't hear too much whining from the 900 guys apart from the typical TKS and baggage nonsense.
 

djh1007

Flying Squirrel Trainee
#32
Our 800A's were not the best. The 1 SP we did get was a bit better, and I actually enjoyed the newer 800XP I contracted on semi regularly. I can echo pretty much all the previous comments.

Flying the Falcon 2000 has been better to and for me in every regard.
 

knot4u

Repeat Offender
#33
Our 800A's were not the best. The 1 SP we did get was a bit better, and I actually enjoyed the newer 800XP I contracted on semi regularly. I can echo pretty much all the previous comments.

Flying the Falcon 2000 has been better to and for me in every regard.
A Falcon 2000 Classic is a wonderful airplane to work on, it's like a 900 with two engines. Everything is easily accessible and I haven't found a claustrophobic spot in one yet.
 

BEEF SUPREME

Well-Known Member
#37
I always wanted to fly the classic 2000. The 900C was a joy to fly.
The 900EX for the win. Once you have A/T it's hard to go back.
I would have killed for autothrottles for all of the Atlantic crossings.

It was made worse by the fact we had gotten extra insulation installed during our C check and the boss could tell if the engines were out of synch. That was exhausting!


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

knot4u

Repeat Offender
#39
I would have killed for autothrottles for all of the Atlantic crossings.

It was made worse by the fact we had gotten extra insulation installed during our C check and the boss could tell if the engines were out of synch. That was exhausting!


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Would've thought it'd work oppositely, regarding the insulation. Used to work on a G-IV owned by an elderly lady and she would complain about a high pitched noise in the cabin that no one else could hear. One day a painter came into the cabin while everything was powered up, he was able to hear and locate the source of the noise. It was an audio amplifier putting out a weird frequency that no one else picked up on. We replaced the amplifier with another identical amplifier and everything was golden afterwards. Sometimes you just get lucky.
 

Stone Cold

Well-Known Member
#40
Would've thought it'd work oppositely, regarding the insulation. Used to work on a G-IV owned by an elderly lady and she would complain about a high pitched noise in the cabin that no one else could hear. One day a painter came into the cabin while everything was powered up, he was able to hear and locate the source of the noise. It was an audio amplifier putting out a weird frequency that no one else picked up on. We replaced the amplifier with another identical amplifier and everything was golden afterwards. Sometimes you just get lucky.
That's what you call a bunch of deaf pilots and mechanics...
 
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