Hawker stalls

Pilotcollin

Well-Known Member
I have been asked by my company to do a test flight on a hawker after the leading edge was removed. That involves a full stall. I have read the hawker manual on how to preform the stall. Has anyone done the stall series before. Are they docile or violent? Advice? And please don’t just say “don’t do it”
 

Inverted25

Well-Known Member
There was a guy at CAE who did them for a long time. Most of the time he said they were docile. He had one that snapped on them when it stalled. He said the barely pulled out before the ground.


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auw2fly

Goldmember
I’ve done a few stall checks on Hawkers, and here’s my honest advice: find someone who’s done them before and fly with them. The whole point of doing a stall check is to make sure the plane handles as it’s normally supposed to. If you’ve never done a stall series before, how will you know if it’s normal?

I will also say that if everything is rigged correctly, there is nothing scary about the stalls (or realistically letting the pusher recover you). The clean is the worst, and they get more docile as you add flaps.

If you need/want the names of some stall guys I know, PM me. They’ve both done hundreds of them.
 

deadstick

Well-Known Member
I’ve done a few stall checks on Hawkers, and here’s my honest advice: find someone who’s done them before and fly with them. The whole point of doing a stall check is to make sure the plane handles as it’s normally supposed to. If you’ve never done a stall series before, how will you know if it’s normal?

I will also say that if everything is rigged correctly, there is nothing scary about the stalls (or realistically letting the pusher recover you). The clean is the worst, and they get more docile as you add flaps.

If you need/want the names of some stall guys I know, PM me. They’ve both done hundreds of them.

My old company did the same thing with a Lear—hired somebody who knew what to look for.
 

TUCKnTRUCK

That guy
Honestly, not a huge deal.

The “barely recovered” story gets passed around a lot. When working at FSI I heard of no less than eleventy pilots who had snap rolled and barely made it out alive.

Based on what I could actually dig out of safety reports/FAA it was one incident with a mechanic on board. Plane had ice on the wings, mechanic didn’t tell flight crew he observed ice.

I don’t doubt that some roll, however I think a lot of it is way over exaggerated. I’d imagine if there was GoPro video of said roll events, most of us watching from a recliner would say “ what’s the big deal?”

The reality- generally stall ident/pusher happens before natural stall. It may happen coincidental to the natural stall so long as roll can be maintained within 20 degrees with aileron input only.

The manual says there is no aerodynamic indication or warning of stall- which is a load of crap. The airplane is very clearly telling you it doesn’t want to be flying.

Be careful on the entry, if you drag out the stall for too long it will roll, if you pull into it too fast, it will roll as well. It takes a bit of time to open those stall valves. Make sure the plane is clean (no ice on the wings, or booze glasses in the galley) leave safe altitude and go do the stalls. Hire a pilot to do the first set if you want, however in general it’s really not a big deal.


If it does snap for some reason, you may get a bit of an upset. There is a slim chance of control snatch. Just unload the wing, get some speed and recover.

I’ve done them three times this year, worst part about doing them is having to go in on a day off to fly the plane.


This is the speed/bank plot of the last time I did them (FO’s speed)
 
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