Fuses

EatSleepFly

Well-Known Member
OK, so we all [should] know that FAR 91.205 requires one spare set of fuses (or three spare fuses of each kind required), accessible to the pilot in flight, for VFR night, and IFR flight. (91.205(c)(6) to be exact).

Well, our fleet of Cessnas all have circuit breakers for the avionics, lights and equipment. The only fuses on these airplanes are in locations that are not accessible to the pilot in flight, or on the ground without removing the cowling, or getting behind the panel. They are for things like the Hobbs meter, external power, cigarrette lighter, and clock. Like I said, not a single one of these could be changed in flight. My question is: Are they still required to be on board?

My answer is no, they are not required to be on board. After all, what good do they do if you can't change them? But I haven't found anyone around here yet today that agrees with me. What do you all think?
 

pilot602

If specified, this will replace the title that
No.

You said it yourself:

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accessible to the pilot in flight

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If you can't get to them what good is it to carry spares. And now that they're under the cowling I'd bet you wouldn't be allowed to change them out anyway because you're not an A&P and "replacing fuses" is not on the preventative maintenance "list."
 

EatSleepFly

Well-Known Member
Right, but "accessible to the pilot" refers to the location of the spare fuses, not the fuses for said components. Ah well, no biggie really.

And, for what its worth...you don't have to be an A&P to remove the cowling, and you certainly don't have to be an A&P to change a fuse....so I would imagine that you don't have to be an A&P to change a fuse thats under the cowling.
 

pilot602

If specified, this will replace the title that
No you don't have to be an A&P to remove a cowling but the fact that the fuse is ... ah nevermind.


Probably should have thought a little more about this before I posted.

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Right, but "accessible to the pilot" refers to the location of the spare fuses, not the fuses for said components. Ah well, no biggie really.

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But, what good does an accessible spare fuse do if the fuse it will replace is inaccessable?

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(6) One spare set of fuses, or three spare fuses of each kind required, that are accessible to the pilot in flight.

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I dunno I think you could make an argument that the above refers to the location of the fuses the spare will replace - but I think it'd be a pretty weak argument.

The bigger question is when/why would you replace a blown fuse? In a critical phase like say an avionics fuse blows while you're on a IAP in IMC sure do it. But if it's non-critical why risk reactivating a system that obviously has a problem?
 

EatSleepFly

Well-Known Member
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But, what good does an accessible spare fuse do if the fuse it will replace is inaccessable?


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Thats my argument. It is now moot though, as my boss has seen fit to make us put the spare fuses in the airplanes anyways. Grrrrr.....


Nothing critical uses fuses (hey, that rhymes) anyways...except for the Hobbs meter of course, lol.
 

pilot602

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In older aircraft you can find fuses on critical equipment ...
 

EatSleepFly

Well-Known Member
hehe...like an Apache perhaps?


Yeah, I've flown quite a few older airplanes that had basically nothing BUT fuses.
 

pilot602

If specified, this will replace the title that
Actually, we're all circuit breakers in the Apache!


But the Champ I'm flying has ... count them, it gets confusing ... THREE fuses!
 

EatSleepFly

Well-Known Member
Bumped this thread, cause I talked to someone from the FAA tonight regarding this.

IF the airplane has a fuse anyplace on board, you ARE required to carry spare fuses in the cockpit for it. Even if the fuse location itself is not even remotely accessible. Better safe than violated I guess.
 
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