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Former baseball player dies in plane crash

AM011309

Well-Known Member
#64
eh, life is sweet no matter what, it beats the hell out of the alternative. Anybody that says otherwise is being macho or something. IMHO.
Definitely not macho here, I for sure 10000000% would rather just be gone. And I know my family would be sad but they'd agree. Not that they wouldn't pay the vegetable hospital bills or be obiliged to take care of the vegetables diaper changing, but we're all on the same page that with zero quality of life, for anyone, ...... WHY.
 
#65
Definitely not macho here, I for sure 10000000% would rather just be gone. And I know my family would be sad but they'd agree.
Well, it is important for everyone, especially pilots, to have a Living Will / Advanced Directive in place. When you are unconscious in a hospital, your family can only do so much. I've been there. When it is in writing, it makes things easier for everyone.
 

milleR

Well-Known Member
#66
Another member on here told me a story about a guy going down in the Glades in a 210. Set it down OK and had planned on waiting it out in the plane. Made the mistake of trying to flip on the master to test the radio, which set the plane on fire. Into the swamp he had to go.

Sleep well.
 

Kingairer

Well-Known Member
#67
Yeah, I almost can't watch the drowning scene in The Perfect Storm or any of those Navy movies after they close the hatches. Ugh.
My biggest takeaway was this from that movie: “wait, no one survived, and there’s no record of conversations like a Cvr, so all this dialouge is totally fictitious and All of the events depicted could be completely contrary to the actual event?”.
Maybe that will help you.
 

killbilly

Vocals, Lyrics, Triangle, Washboard, Kittens
#68
It's actually been years since I've seen it, now will have to re-watch. Never read the book, will put it on my recreational reading list!
It's one of the better novelizations I've read. Orson Scott Card wrote it while they were filming. He created a terrific backstory for all the characters - even the aliens. Complements the movie really well.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro
 

USMCmech

Well-Known Member
#69
For a normal person, after 3 minutes submurged in warm water (5-8 in cold) there will be so much brain damage that the patient will likely never have any meaningful quality of life. In this case, I would be willing to bet that

eh, life is sweet no matter what, it beats the hell out of the alternative. Anybody that says otherwise is being macho or something. IMHO.
I'm guessing you have limited experience working with people whose lives were "saved" by modern medicne. There are many things worse than dying, and most of them involve not dying.
 

gotWXdagain

Highly Visible Member
#70
For a normal person, after 3 minutes submurged in warm water (5-8 in cold) there will be so much brain damage that the patient will likely never have any meaningful quality of life. In this case, I would be willing to bet that



I'm guessing you have limited experience working with people whose lives were "saved" by modern medicne. There are many things worse than dying, and most of them involve not dying.
And until you've seen some of these "miracles" you'll never realize the hell that some people will put their family members through because of their own unwillingness to let go and let nature take its course.
 

touch-n-go

Well-Known Member
#71
Honestly, I don't think it's a bad design. In fact all the reports I've read about the airplane say it's a great little airplane that handels great, and performs reasonably well for it's class. However, the marketing strategy of "a jet ski with wings" and the abreviated training program gave me pause from day one. Landing an airplane on the water always has been and always will be fraught with risk.

FYI, I also think the Crirrus is the best single engine airplane on the market, but the CAPS parachute is irrelevant to me.
Yeah. The marketing videos seem to encourage the kind of flying seen in the accident video. Except customers may not necessarily have the experience and proficiency to do such low level hot dogging.

 

bucksmith

Did you lock the doors?
#72
For a normal person, after 3 minutes submurged in warm water (5-8 in cold) there will be so much brain damage that the patient will likely never have any meaningful quality of life. In this case, I would be willing to bet that



I'm guessing you have limited experience working with people whose lives were "saved" by modern medicne. There are many things worse than dying, and most of them involve not dying.
Well, I believe we are really talking about two different things. I know what you're saying and I don't disagree. Being kept alive as a carrot or being brought back from flatline, after nature has taken its course is certainly not something I'd be interested in.
I would argue (and my not so clearly made point) that many people that say they'd rather die than live with some major handicap would change their tune quickly when faced with the choice. (Not that we really get one) I have plenty of experience with that, and I can tell you each life is precious and has the potential to touch someone or have an impact on their environment. I'm sure you wouldn't disagree. One particular case was a buddy that woke after a 6 month coma. His wife and I spent everyday with him then watched as he learned to talk and walk again. Apparently, he didn't forget how to boink, they made a baby before he could walk.
I also remember a great quote from a close family friend. The guy fell off a roof and was paralyzed from the neck down. You can probably imagine some of the things a guy like that has to go thru and what a sudden change of lifestyle it would be. My Dad asked him how he goes on, he responded simply. "Life is sweet".
Speaking of which, the last year of my Dads life was akin to the conditions some might be speaking of here. I wouldn't wish those days on anybody, and we certainly never entertained any kind of miracles to prolong that condition. But that last year and the words whispered in my ear where irreplaceable, and I would bet he wouldn't of traded those very few moments to avoid the pain of that last year. Anyway, I'm sorry, a bit off topic, maybe telling too many stories to explain the point I didn't make very well in the first place.

As a commercial fisherman I refuse to watch that movie.
I was a long liner for a couple years before making the real money on a scallop boat. Longest I spent on a sword boat was 25 days and we were routinely 250 miles from land while fishing some of the spots mentioned in the movie. Was shooting the chit with the old salty skipper up in the wheel house one day and the conversation came around to what he'd do if we were going down out here. He pulled out a set of handcuffs he carried with him and told me I could have fun bobbing around to death. He would secure himself to the rail and get it done quick. I still get chills thinking about it since I knew he was serious. I guess I just cling to life and and am optimistic I'd find a way to live.
 

High_Alpha

Well-Known Member
#73
Good thoughts. There's a vast gulf between foregoing extraordinary measures to artificially prolong life, versus appointing ourselves as arbitrators of the value of life--i.e., presuming to say when life is "worth living" and when it's not. The conversation can be confusing sometimes, because the same terms are used in both cases--"dignity," for instance--but the moral distinction is huge.
 

Stone Cold

Well-Known Member
#76
Yeah, I almost can't watch the drowning scene in The Perfect Storm or any of those Navy movies after they close the hatches. Ugh.
The absolute worst part, and the thing I keep thinking about in reflection, is this absolutely did play out 2 times in the last year or so in real life. I couldn't imagine closing the watertight hatch and finding out later people were still inside.

I think most of the Navy guys on here have had the same thoughts recently. It's very sobering...

Just to add, I've lost way too many friends, but to know you sentenced friends to Davey Jones' locker... ugh.
 
#77
The absolute worst part, and the thing I keep thinking about in reflection, is this absolutely did play out 2 times in the last year or so in real life. I couldn't imagine closing the watertight hatch and finding out later people were still inside.

I think most of the Navy guys on here have had the same thoughts recently. It's very sobering...
It's a recurring theme in fiction because it's an examination of society in microcosm—a situation that neatly encapsulates the dilemma of sacrificing oneself / the few for the good of the whole in a very relatable way.

Also, it happens, and it's something that must be faced. a0wejf aopwefk awepfa[wtk309 [tj words words words blah blah blah is this thing even on aoiehwtawh583twh

-Fox
 

bucksmith

Did you lock the doors?
#78
The absolute worst part, and the thing I keep thinking about in reflection, is this absolutely did play out 2 times in the last year or so in real life. I couldn't imagine closing the watertight hatch and finding out later people were still inside.

I think most of the Navy guys on here have had the same thoughts recently. It's very sobering...

Just to add, I've lost way too many friends, but to know you sentenced friends to Davey Jones' locker... ugh.
Good point, on one side of the hatch, their problems have just ended. On the other side, their problems have just begun. Ugh, indeed!
 

bucksmith

Did you lock the doors?
#80
Too late. And I had forgot about that one.
On the flip side, how bout the scenes in the movies where the astronaut goes floating away in a space suit. That seems like such a pleasant way to go. (Although I'm not exactly sure what happens during carbon dioxide poisoning, but I like to imagine they just go to sleep while floating in the vastness of space. Ahh, happy place...)